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IHaveADegreeInMarineBioBut

60 gallon to 10 gallons--YEAR UPDATE!

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IHaveADegreeInMarineBioBut
On 1/5/2019 at 11:36 AM, Clown79 said:

530gph may be high in a 10g, depending on corals you plan on keeping.

 

Its 53 times turnover which is suited for sps.

not sure i want corals (of course I want corals, but a nice lil clown is good for right now i think). 

7 hours ago, Fisker said:

Not sure it's the GPH that determines how much flow is too much flow in these small tanks (within reason) - I think it's the way the flow is outputted.

 

If you have a 530 GPH powerhead in a ten gallon that pushes all of the water through a 3/4" opening, then it's just going to jet across the tank and throw fish around.

 

If you take that same powerhead and push the water through a larger opening and disperse the flow a bit, you won't have issues, IME.

 

I've got an AC 30 and a Koralia Nano 425 in my standard 10 gallon, and that's a total of 575 GPH. The tank could still handle a bit more, and I think it's just due to how the flow is released.

 

Anyway, the whole point of that was to say that you should look into the Koralia Nano pumps, if you need to accommodate the clown.

The dimension difference makes sense. I was looking at the Koralia.. but it was 3x more expensive than the pump I got so yeah.. I'll see how I can dumb-down the flow somehow.. 

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IHaveADegreeInMarineBioBut

Everything is going good! Ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates all at 0. Salinity 1.025. pH 8.4 during the day. My only problem are phosphates--which I need to test the RO/DI water I am buying to see if it has phosphates in it.. But does anyone have any remedies for a ~1.0-2.0 phosphate reading?

 

Also.. could someone give me a little help ID'ing some stuff? I've got these clear tube worm things kind of. I've never had so many and they're starting to take over my rocks. I don't care, but I'm just wondering!

 

And then this weird film is covering this one rock too. It's like a spider web, I guess would be my best comparison? 

 

Any ideas??IMG_1700.thumb.JPG.dea7a698aa4d60292b8600518260e39e.JPGIMG_1702.thumb.JPG.adb3c72ff5e0e2e0a0c07753c255eb95.JPGIMG_1701-1.thumb.JPG.abf399b4494d5b93fb28b3564837c6ca.JPG

 

Another water change tomorrow! and maybe a watchman coming soon. Still need to work on the powerhead flow. 

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Fisker

No clue on IDs, but it doesn't look like anything harmful. Might be some type of sponge, and a harmless worm.

 

If phosphates are reading between 1-2 PPM, that's crazy high - I've seen a couple tanks run like that, but they were extremely mature and still ran on tech from the 80's and 90's. I find that I have quite a bit of nuisance algae growing at around 0.05 PPM, and the macroalgae I'm using is just now starting to out-compete the nasty stuff. I can't imagine what I'd be dealing with at 2 PPM, so I'm interested to see what other people would say about that reading. Personally, I'd suspect that the RO/DI you're using is EXTREMELY dirty (my tap water doesn't even have .1 PPM phosphate in it...), or there's something in your tank that's causing phosphate to shoot up. Decaying organic matter would help with that, but then I'd expect to see a relatively high nitrate reading too... so, my bet is on bad RO/DI, or your rock/substrate leeching phosphate into the water.

 

I really like this tank! It reminds me of the saltwater tanks I grew up seeing, in a good way. Simple equipment, simple stock, colorful rock, a coarse substrate, and lots of microfauna. None of the crazy lighting and coral that we have now - and though that stuff is beautiful, tanks like these have a nice charm 🙂

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IHaveADegreeInMarineBioBut
13 minutes ago, Fisker said:

No clue on IDs, but it doesn't look like anything harmful. Might be some type of sponge, and a harmless worm.

 

If phosphates are reading between 1-2 PPM, that's crazy high - I've seen a couple tanks run like that, but they were extremely mature and still ran on tech from the 80's and 90's. I find that I have quite a bit of nuisance algae growing at around 0.05 PPM, and the macroalgae I'm using is just now starting to out-compete the nasty stuff. I can't imagine what I'd be dealing with at 2 PPM, so I'm interested to see what other people would say about that reading. Personally, I'd suspect that the RO/DI you're using is EXTREMELY dirty (my tap water doesn't even have .1 PPM phosphate in it...), or there's something in your tank that's causing phosphate to shoot up. Decaying organic matter would help with that, but then I'd expect to see a relatively high nitrate reading too... so, my bet is on bad RO/DI, or your rock/substrate leeching phosphate into the water.

 

I really like this tank! It reminds me of the saltwater tanks I grew up seeing, in a good way. Simple equipment, simple stock, colorful rock, a coarse substrate, and lots of microfauna. None of the crazy lighting and coral that we have now - and though that stuff is beautiful, tanks like these have a nice charm 🙂

ah i didn't even think of a sponge, but that sounds completely plausible. 

yeah, i've gotta test it.. my tap water runs at about 1 ppm I am pretty sure. I just cleaned the substrate the other week and plan to do some more tomorrow. I used to have a problem with nitrates, but now the phosphates are becoming my crux! 

 

And thank you, I'm glad you enjoy it! I really wanted to keep it simple (mainly cheap). And while I would LOVE to try my hand at corals in this, there is something I really like about its simplicity as well. It's perfect in its own way

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Clown79

Looks like a sponge on the rocks 

 

The stringy stuff almost looks like dead chaeto pieces.

 

Before taking any steps to start using a phos reducer, are you using any sponges in your filter?

 

Where are you buying your water? Lfs or a machine?

 

Machines are often only RO water, not rodi.

 

Lfs may not sell rodi either or change their filters accordingly leading to non pure water.

 

I would test the water for tds and phos.

 

When in doubt use distilled water if you can't buy your own rodi unit.

 

 

Once you know the water quality then we can better figure out a reduction plan.

 

Waterchanges are best and safest but if it's from your water then waterchanges eith the same water is useless.

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IHaveADegreeInMarineBioBut
1 hour ago, Clown79 said:

Looks like a sponge on the rocks 

 

The stringy stuff almost looks like dead chaeto pieces.

 

Before taking any steps to start using a phos reducer, are you using any sponges in your filter?

 

Where are you buying your water? Lfs or a machine?

 

Machines are often only RO water, not rodi.

 

Lfs may not sell rodi either or change their filters accordingly leading to non pure water.

 

I would test the water for tds and phos.

 

When in doubt use distilled water if you can't buy your own rodi unit.

 

 

Once you know the water quality then we can better figure out a reduction plan.

 

Waterchanges are best and safest but if it's from your water then waterchanges eith the same water is useless.

Yeah looks like a sponge! It even has some osculum-like structures. And no the stringy things are definitely alive--they come in and out, especially when it's feeding time. And they've definitely multiplied since I downgraded. 

 

And I'm buying it from a water store. It's definitely RO.. but you have a good point. Not exactly sure if it's DI too. But you mean to just buy distilled water from the supermarket? I might do that, just because gallon jugs are easier to handle than the 5 gallon jug I have, plus the no phosphates! 

 

Right now I am just using some activated carbon and (I had it lying around so I'm not really sure which it is..) either phosphate or ammonia reducer in the filter. I am thinking the latter though as I didn't see any change in the following days. 

 

But if you think distilled water is best, that might make things easier all around. 

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Lula_Mae
7 minutes ago, IHaveADegreeInMarineBioBut said:

Yeah looks like a sponge! It even has some osculum-like structures. And no the stringy things are definitely alive--they come in and out, especially when it's feeding time. And they've definitely multiplied since I downgraded. 

 

And I'm buying it from a water store. It's definitely RO.. but you have a good point. Not exactly sure if it's DI too. But you mean to just buy distilled water from the supermarket? I might do that, just because gallon jugs are easier to handle than the 5 gallon jug I have, plus the no phosphates! 

 

Right now I am just using some activated carbon and (I had it lying around so I'm not really sure which it is..) either phosphate or ammonia reducer in the filter. I am thinking the latter though as I didn't see any change in the following days. 

 

But if you think distilled water is best, that might make things easier all around. 

I used distilled water (mostly from Walmart) for years.  If you have a TDS meter or access to one you can check the TDS of the water you're using, ideally it should be 0.

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IHaveADegreeInMarineBioBut
1 minute ago, Lula_Mae said:

I used distilled water (mostly from Walmart) for years.  If you have a TDS meter or access to one you can check the TDS of the water you're using, ideally it should be 0.

sorry, what is a TDS meter and what do the readings indicate? 

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IHaveADegreeInMarineBioBut
Just now, Lula_Mae said:

TDS = total dissolved solids.  A TDS meter reads how much stuff is in the water, basically.

 

https://www.theaquariumsolution.com/tds-what-does-it-mean-and-why-should-i-test

 

Ah okay so just a general overview of particles in the water, but not what those particles are?

 

I do not think I'll ever have access to one of these, unfortunately. But I do have my test kits! 

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Lula_Mae
3 minutes ago, IHaveADegreeInMarineBioBut said:

Ah okay so just a general overview of particles in the water, but not what those particles are?

 

I do not think I'll ever have access to one of these, unfortunately. But I do have my test kits! 

It looks like they're pretty inexpensive to buy, but if you want to go the safe route and just use distilled till you decide to invest in an RO/DI unit, that's perfectly fine.  I didn't get a TDS meter till I got it with my RO/DI unit which I bought secondhand off another reefer.

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Clown79
9 hours ago, IHaveADegreeInMarineBioBut said:

Yeah looks like a sponge! It even has some osculum-like structures. And no the stringy things are definitely alive--they come in and out, especially when it's feeding time. And they've definitely multiplied since I downgraded. 

 

And I'm buying it from a water store. It's definitely RO.. but you have a good point. Not exactly sure if it's DI too. But you mean to just buy distilled water from the supermarket? I might do that, just because gallon jugs are easier to handle than the 5 gallon jug I have, plus the no phosphates! 

 

Right now I am just using some activated carbon and (I had it lying around so I'm not really sure which it is..) either phosphate or ammonia reducer in the filter. I am thinking the latter though as I didn't see any change in the following days. 

 

But if you think distilled water is best, that might make things easier all around. 

Ro water is just 1 step above tap water. It's not pure water, therefore there will be tds, phos, nitrates etc etc in it. It's good for drinking.

 

Tds meters can be purchased for a low price on amazon.

 

If it's not advertised as RODI then it's not likely RODI.

 

Distilled water from the grocery store, walmart is safe to use. As long as it's not remineralized, which bottles state If it is. 

 

Activated carbon doesn't reduce ammonia or phosphate. It polishes water and removes toxins etc.

 

https://www.thesprucepets.com/using-activated-carbon-in-aquarium-systems-2924393

 

A good carbon is important to use, smaller quantities used and changed more often 2-3 weeks is best(large amounts can remove trace elements)

 

Some activated carbon is known to leach phosphate back into the tank, it's best to stick to certain brands to prevent this.

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IHaveADegreeInMarineBioBut
9 hours ago, Clown79 said:

Activated carbon doesn't reduce ammonia or phosphate. It polishes water and removes toxins etc.

 

https://www.thesprucepets.com/using-activated-carbon-in-aquarium-systems-2924393

 

A good carbon is important to use, smaller quantities used and changed more often 2-3 weeks is best(large amounts can remove trace elements)

 

Some activated carbon is known to leach phosphate back into the tank, it's best to stick to certain brands to prevent this.

I actually didn't know activated carbon didn't help with ammonia! Wow.. I've learned more on this forum than any other time I've researched.

I meant to say, I had these white pellets for filter media laying around. My best guess was it was for phosphates or ammonia. Figured it wouldn't hurt to put in. 

 

And do you have a recommended brand? Need to buy some more soon 

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Clown79
12 minutes ago, IHaveADegreeInMarineBioBut said:

I actually didn't know activated carbon didn't help with ammonia! Wow.. I've learned more on this forum than any other time I've researched.

I meant to say, I had these white pellets for filter media laying around. My best guess was it was for phosphates or ammonia. Figured it wouldn't hurt to put in. 

 

And do you have a recommended brand? Need to buy some more soon 

If its white, it's not activated carbon. Carbon is black.

 

Never add anything to the tank you aren't 100% sure what it is and some of it isn't necessary to use.

 

 

Phos reducing media needs to be used very carefully. High end test kit like hanna which reads the lowest possible levels and testing every 4 days is required or you can easily strip the tank.

 

 

My favorite carbon is Kent marine. The lowest amount of dust in any carbon I have used. Second to that is Seachem.

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IHaveADegreeInMarineBioBut
1 minute ago, Clown79 said:

If its white, it's not activated carbon. Carbon is black.

 

Never add anything to the tank you aren't 100% sure what it is and some of it isn't necessary to use.

 

 

Phos reducing media needs to be used very carefully. High end test kit like hanna which reads the lowest possible levels and testing every 4 days is required or you can easily strip the tank.

 

 

My favorite carbon is Kent marine. The lowest amount of dust in any carbon I have used. Second to that is Seachem.

I misspoke again. There's both carbon and the white pellets in the filter. 

 

I think I'll start buying the distilled water (w/o minerals added) and get some new carbon!

 

Thank you so much for all your help. 

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Clown79
26 minutes ago, IHaveADegreeInMarineBioBut said:

I misspoke again. There's both carbon and the white pellets in the filter. 

 

I think I'll start buying the distilled water (w/o minerals added) and get some new carbon!

 

Thank you so much for all your help. 

You're welcome

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IHaveADegreeInMarineBioBut

Update: just finished a ~25% water change and gravel cleaning.

 

I tested the RO water again and phosphate read 0. But I then tested the phosphates in my tank and they were still around 1. So I guess next water change I'll do about 50%. Beginning to feel like the state of Florida with phosphate problems. 

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IHaveADegreeInMarineBioBut

The tank is doing really great! I have to buy more filter media though.. and I know that someone mentioned floss? or something that replaces carbon altogether? I was wondering if anyone had any recommendations please. It's a simple 10 gallon HOB. 

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Fisker
1 minute ago, IHaveADegreeInMarineBioBut said:

The tank is doing really great! I have to buy more filter media though.. and I know that someone mentioned floss? or something that replaces carbon altogether? I was wondering if anyone had any recommendations please. It's a simple 10 gallon HOB. 

Well, it depends on what you're needing.

 

Bio filtration should be done by your Live Rock - so no need for sponges or any biological media in the HOB, unless you're keeping it in there for the possibility of a QT tank.

 

Mechanical can be done by using filter floss, or by using polyfill with nothing added. Throw it in there after a WC, and take it out after a few hours. It does a great job at polishing the water, and is incredibly cheap.

 

As for replacing carbon, a lot of people with recommend either Purigen or Chemipure Blue - they're both supposed to do the same thing as carbon, plus aid in reducing phosphates by removing waste before it decays. They seem to work, although they aren't necessary.

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IHaveADegreeInMarineBioBut
2 minutes ago, Fisker said:

Well, it depends on what you're needing.

 

Bio filtration should be done by your Live Rock - so no need for sponges or any biological media in the HOB, unless you're keeping it in there for the possibility of a QT tank.

 

Mechanical can be done by using filter floss, or by using polyfill with nothing added. Throw it in there after a WC, and take it out after a few hours. It does a great job at polishing the water, and is incredibly cheap.

 

As for replacing carbon, a lot of people with recommend either Purigen or Chemipure Blue - they're both supposed to do the same thing as carbon, plus aid in reducing phosphates by removing waste before it decays. They seem to work, although they aren't necessary.

Everything is going alright besides still trying to get the phosphates down, but I've gone to 5 places for distilled water and they've all sold out--people put it in their humidifiers and stuff when they're sick. who knew? so water changes have been a little limited. i haven't done the good 50% one yet.

 

do you have a brand to recommend for floss? 

 

And thank you! i will look into both of those

 

 

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Fisker

I use the walmart brand polyfill. It's got nothing added, and is like $2 for a massive bag.

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IHaveADegreeInMarineBioBut

just ordered some chemipure blue 🙂 and ill look at the floss next time i go to walmart! thank you!

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Clown79
On 1/31/2019 at 12:54 PM, IHaveADegreeInMarineBioBut said:

The tank is doing really great! I have to buy more filter media though.. and I know that someone mentioned floss? or something that replaces carbon altogether? I was wondering if anyone had any recommendations please. It's a simple 10 gallon HOB. 

I like using floss for particles which I change 2-3 times a week

 

Kent carbon i bag myself and change every 2 weeks. I like to use less and change more often. 

 

I also run a bag of purigen which I change when it goes brown.

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IHaveADegreeInMarineBioBut

Some updates! I've started using Chemipure.. got some beginner corals cause I just couldn't resist. I also wanted to see just how minimum I could get with the tank--I also wanted to see if substituted natural light (as seen by the glare) could sustain the tank instead of an upgraded light. Everything is at the level that I would like it to be and couldn't be happier.

Goby has that whole right side of the tank tunneled! 

IMG_2279.thumb.JPG.1f42ba88de75440a8581b95f607dcff1.JPG

IMG_2280.JPG

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