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HarryPotter

Potter's "Engorgio!" 300ml micro-reef

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@seabass @markalot nutrient seem a bit high in the tank, even though I am not feeding much. I was thinking of running another sort of filtration besides the skimmer. 

 

You two know chemicals and stuff..... I would prefer avoiding GFO because that bounces nutrients around. (Gets used up and phosphates climb, then you replace it and it spikes down again). 

 

Would a Zeolith reactor be something worth considering? I saw this new at @bulkreefsupply. I figure its just like biopellets, more surface area tumbling for bacteria. 

 

https://www.bulkreefsupply.com/zar-157-automatic-zeolith-reactor-skimz.html

 

 

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I kind of cringe at carbon dosing.  Not that it's bad, but that I believe that it adds another layer of complexity.  IMO, Zeovit is an attempt to run an ultra low nutrient system.  If you can achieve that, you might even have to modify your alkalinity levels.  That system has a multitude of accompanying products (amino acids and such) that can be used along with the addition of carbon.  I believe @metrokat has some experience with it.

 

I know that people effectively use carbon dosing to control nutrients (versus running an ULNS), and that's probably how I'd use it if I were to go down that path.  I've never actually carbon dosed (vinegar, vodka, bio-pellets, etc), even though I own some bio-pellets and a bio-pellet reactor).

 

In the past, I've used PhosGuard to help bring down phosphate levels.  It doesn't affect alkalinity like GFO (which can actually bind alkalinity).  However, you still have to monitor phosphate levels to know when to replace it, and even when to pull it out (so that phosphate doesn't drop too low).

 

Nutrient control can be a major inconvenience.  Right now, I'm relying on decorative macros in my display (although a refugium might be required with Tangs in the display).

 

Adding herbivores always helps.  I've seen some mature setups that boast high nutrient levels but don't seem to have out of control algae growth.  I attribute that to a well balanced mix of herbivores (fish, crabs, snails, and micro-inverts).

 

IDK, I even suspect that starting with dry rock has something to do with algae, cyano, and other pests.  The lack of bio-diversity (especially bacteria, micro-inverts, and even coralline algae) might have something to do with it.  I've attempted to add some of this into my dry rock tanks.  I think it has helped somewhat.

 

All that said, you might have good luck with Zeovit.  However, I don't have any personal experience to convey.  There are people that swear by it, and others that will warn you away from any form of carbon dosing.  Sorry, not much help on this topic.  I seem to struggle at times with this as well.

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2 minutes ago, seabass said:

I kind of cringe at carbon dosing.  Not that it's bad, but that I believe that it adds another layer of complexity.  IMO, Zeovit is an attempt to run an ultra low nutrient system.  If you can achieve that, you might even have to modify your alkalinity levels.  That system has a multitude of accompanying products (amino acids and such) that can be used along with the addition of carbon.  I believe @metrokat has some experience with it.

  

I know that people effectively use carbon dosing to control nutrients (versus running an ULNS), and that's probably how I'd use it if I were to go down that path.  I've never actually carbon dosed (vinegar, vodka, bio-pellets, etc), even though I own some bio-pellets and a bio-pellet reactor).

  

In the past, I've used PhosGuard to help bring down phosphate levels.  It doesn't affect alkalinity like GFO (which can actually bind alkalinity).  However, you still have to monitor phosphate levels to know when to replace it, and even when to pull it out (so that phosphate doesn't drop too low).

  

Nutrient control can be a major inconvenience.  Right now, I'm relying on decorative macros in my display (although a refugium might be required with Tangs in the display).

  

Adding herbivores always helps.  I've seen some mature setups that boast high nutrient levels but don't seem to have out of control algae growth.  I attribute that to a well balanced mix of herbivores (fish, crabs, snails, and micro-inverts).

  

IDK, I even suspect that starting with dry rock has something to do with algae, cyano, and other pests.  The lack of bio-diversity (especially bacteria, micro-inverts, and even coralline algae) might have something to do with it.  I've attempted to add some of this into my dry rock tanks.  I think it has helped somewhat.

 

All that said, you might have good luck with Zeovit.  However, I don't have any personal experience to convey.  There are people that swear by it, and others that will warn you away from any form of carbon dosing.  Sorry, not much help on this topic.  I seem to struggle at times with this as well.

 

Zeovit is a form of carbon dosing? I thought it is tumbling surface area, like biopellets. Im lost then LOL. 

 

Thanks for the response... I hesitate to use chemical filtration. 

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This might help clear it up:

 

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3 hours ago, HarryPotter said:

 

Zeovit is a form of carbon dosing? I thought it is tumbling surface area, like biopellets. Im lost then LOL. 

 

Thanks for the response... I hesitate to use chemical filtration. 

I had high levels on my old 35g ( my favorite tank I've built ) and used vodka and MB7. It did wonders. It was a royal pain in the ass the first month but once I had a schedule down it worked like magic. It did not effect the ALK or other parameters but could make my corals look pale within days if I added to much vodka. Again once it was set, it was incredible. 

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You know I hate that stuff.  Let it ride, stop testing, pretend nutrients are low.  Let it ride.

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7 hours ago, HarryPotter said:

 

Zeovit is a form of carbon dosing? I thought it is tumbling surface area, like biopellets. Im lost then LOL. 

 

Thanks for the response... I hesitate to use chemical filtration. 

Biopellets are also carbon dosing.

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So, my dad had a few nice legal cases and asked me to get another pack for this 300 gallon. Instead of going BattleCorals, I messaged "Bubbaque" on R2R (Probably tied with markalot for my favorite SPS tank) and arranged a pack.  Its coming Wednesday, super excited! 

 

The names (Posting them here because I will surely forget and just call them "red acro", "blue milli" etc later. 

 

Palmers Blue Millipora  
TCK fruity pebbles
CB malicifent
Sexy Corals Orange Passion 
AquaSD Rainbow milli 
Red Devil Nasuta 
WWC Christmas Mirabilis 
Tyree Tierra Del Fuego 


Ignore the distortion- this was 2 photos put together. 

 

 

yBNMwsL.jpg

 

5g9HyKd.jpg

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On 1/11/2019 at 5:02 PM, markalot said:

You know I hate that stuff.  Let it ride, stop testing, pretend nutrients are low.  Let it ride.

 

On 1/11/2019 at 6:46 PM, RoboNarples2929 said:

 Biopellets are also carbon dosing.

 

I didnt know that about biopellets. I thought it was "surface area" for bacteria, like biobricks. Now I understand :slap:

 

Agreed, I'll keep it simple.  The refugium chamber is covered in nice coralline so I might add cheato there, but Ill avoid chemicals like I do in my reefer. 

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