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weston.bechtold

Torches losing color:(

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weston.bechtold

Hello all! I am asking for help concerning my torch corals loss of color.  I have 3 branching torch corals next to each other that caught my eye at the LFS.  But it seems as though the corals looked much more vibrant at the LFS and then once placed in my tank, they lose their vibrancy and start to take on a blander and more fleshy skin color.  I am testing everyday for CA ALK MG as well as the ammonia nitrite nitrate ph and everything is close to perfect.  I have maintained these stable water parameters so I don't believe this is the cause.  I am using a kessil A80 tuna blue over this 2.6 gallon fluval spec 3 aquarium.  WHY IS THIS HAPPENING????? Any comments are appreciated! Thankyou!

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seabass

LPS getting more pale is usually a sign of insufficient light.  Color pop (fluorescence) however, is often related to the light spectrum (and is often immediate).  Health can be affected by alkalinity swings, feeding, nutrient levels, as well as lighting and flow.

 

Low phosphate and nitrate can negatively affect health.  That's right, detectable levels of phosphate (0.01 to 0.03 ppm) is typically a good thing.  However, too much phosphate can make algae growth a problem, and might affect coral color (often more muted or brownish).

 

People often report that their parameters are good without posting the values and which kits they use.  This information doesn't really tell us much.  Also, pictures can help us determine health.

 

How high is the light over the water?  It's not the strongest of lights, I would probably place it around 4" from the waterline.

 

You might also consider that the coral may not have been in good health when you purchased it.  So it's possible that the coral is recovering, and that the new color is its natural coloration (even though you might have preferred its previous color).

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weston.bechtold
8 hours ago, seabass said:

LPS getting more pale is usually a sign of insufficient light.  Color pop (fluorescence) however, is often related to the light spectrum (and is often immediate).  Health can be affected by alkalinity swings, feeding, nutrient levels, as well as lighting and flow.

 

Low phosphate and nitrate can negatively affect health.  That's right, detectable levels of phosphate (0.01 to 0.03 ppm) is typically a good thing.  However, too much phosphate can make algae growth a problem, and might affect coral color (often more muted or brownish).

 

People often report that their parameters are good without posting the values and which kits they use.  This information doesn't really tell us much.  Also, pictures can help us determine health.

 

How high is the light over the water?  It's not the strongest of lights, I would probably place it around 4" from the waterline.

 

You might also consider that the coral may not have been in good health when you purchased it.  So it's possible that the coral is recovering, and that the new color is its natural coloration (even though you might have preferred its previous color).

Im using the red sea test kit for ALK CA MG, and the API test kit for ammonia nitrate trite and ph.  The light is about 10" over the water! Should I just bite the bullet and buy the AI prime.. :/

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seabass
7 hours ago, weston.bechtold said:

The light is about 10" over the water!

Why not just lower it?

 

You should also test phosphate.  Don't bother with API's phosphate kit, it's a high range kit that goes up in 0.25 ppm increments.  Use either the Hanna ULR Phosphorus Checker or Salifert's Phosphate test kit.

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Droy008

lol, ^ yea just lower the light man

 

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gone_PHiSHin

you could start by lowering the light but that may not be your problem and could make things worse.  it certainly isn't the capabilities of the light, it's plenty powerful for euphyllia in a spec3.  in fact, in a 2.6 gal, you could have too much light hitting it, especially without proper acclimation after getting them from your fish store.  

 

check out this thread, he's got an A80 over an IM10 and his torches look nice and healthy.  maybe talk to him and ask about his settings, height over tank, params, etc for a little insight.

 

in my opinion we need more info on your parameters.  what is your alk?  does it swing throughout the week?  are you dosing to keep up with demand?

 

i recently learned my nitrates and phosphates play a larger part in color/polyp extension than i previously thought - i was running a way too 'clean' tank.  definitely listen to seabass when he says get an accurate reading on phosphates, it helped me.  i recommend the Hanna ULR phosphorus checker too

 

 

edit: also, pics help if you can post 'em!

 

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