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Subsea

Bugs Rule

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https://www.tlc-products.com/productscience/

 

I just dosed a start up dose of bacteria “StartSmart Complete”.  Why.  Because I believe that the foundation of live food on a reef is bacteria and phytoplankton.  If you read the science behind the bacteria, there is a section on bacteria density growth rates.  If  bacteria A takes 30 minutes to multiply and bacteria B takes 60 minutes to multiply.  In five hourss, Bacteria A will outnumber Bacteria B  by 30 fold.  Is that bad, it depends on the bacteria.

 

 

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This is why I set up tanks with only live rock and rubble. Preferably from several different sources. That way I maximize the biology in a closed environment, hopefully getting as many strains of competitive beneficial bacteria as possible. I'm not positive it works, but I've been pretty good so far. And I'm one to push the limits on fish stocking.

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21 hours ago, Subsea said:

 

https://www.tlc-products.com/productscience/

 

I just dosed a start up dose of bacteria “StartSmart Complete”.  Why.  Because I believe that the foundation of live food on a reef is bacteria and phytoplankton.  If you read the science behind the bacteria, there is a section on bacteria density growth rates.  If  bacteria A takes 30 minutes to multiply and bacteria B takes 60 minutes to multiply.  In five hourss, Bacteria A will outnumber Bacteria B  by 30 fold.  Is that bad, it depends on the bacteria.

 

 

Seeding your tank with live nitrifying bacteria is helpful, but these bacteria are literally all around us. By adding a bacterial culture to a new tank, you're giving a jump start to the right strains of bacteria that are required to break down nitrogenous wastes. As to bacterial populations and the rise and fall of the numbers of specific strains, these issues tend to self regulate over time. 

 

After reading the information on that link, all I could think about was Rid-Ex. There is some anecdotal use of Rid-Ex to cycle aquaria. Hurray for the industrial septic sewage industry!

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I think it's safe to say that any piece of natural live rock from the ocean is going to have a great multitude of bacterial species that can perform various processes such as nitrification, denitrification, etc.  Seems likely that once the rocks are in our aquariums for a while the number of different species would diminish as those best adapted to the specific conditions would prevail.  

 

Personally, I'm not so much concerned about the number of species being high, just so long as at least a few are present in sufficient numbers to maintain a healthy, stable system. 

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This thread reminds me of the old lily pad in an enclosed pond exponential math conundrum.

 

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I used dry rock and sand, to avoid hitchhikers. I've been thinking lately, that I do wish I had more biodiversity. Not just in bacteria, but things like worms, amphipods, those tiny snail things, sponges, feather dusters, ect. 

 

I'd like to buy a bag-o-reef seeding stuff and dump in mine. What do you all recommend? So far I see GARF Grunge (which seems to be all in one and very inexpensive), and IPSF (which seems to be more modular and expensive). Wish I had someone with a tank near me that had a booming tank to scoop out of. 

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Obviously certain bacteria will outcompete others in a closed system. And yes, nitrifying bacteria are present in the air, dust and dirt all around us. Hell, bottled bacteria and dried bacteria for aquariums have been around and used for many years. I just figure Mother Nature is far better, and far more efficient. It's my opinion that a stepped introduction of both wild and captive strains from various sources makes for a better, more stable system.

 

Xhunt, try ordering some sand from Tampa bay saltwater. Another option would be inland aquatics in Indians. Though I believe that'll be around $100, too.

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7 hours ago, OPtasia said:

Seeding your tank with live nitrifying bacteria is helpful, but these bacteria are literally all around us. By adding a bacterial culture to a new tank, you're giving a jump start to the right strains of bacteria that are required to break down nitrogenous wastes. As to bacterial populations and the rise and fall of the numbers of specific strains, these issues tend to self regulate over time. 

 

After reading the information on that link, all I could think about was Rid-Ex. There is some anecdotal use of Rid-Ex to cycle aquaria. Hurray for the industrial septic sewage industry!

I have used Rid X.  It is a fact that many bacteria can live in fresh and salt water.  I would agree that nitrifying bacteria should not have to be reseeded.  

I am in conversation with TLC tech services to get details as to what bacteria cultures are in product.  If it is snake oil, I want to know what kind of snake.

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