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CinnamonTorch

HELP! DAY 5 INTO CYCLE, HOW TO LOWER NITRATE?

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CinnamonTorch

Hello everyone, I'm currently in day 5 of my cycle, these are my parameters so far:
ammonia 0

nitrite 0

nitrate 40

 

Keep in mind the following: I have a nuvo 10 gallon tank, I bought 10 lbs of live rock, used 5-7 lbs of live sand, and I also used 70% of my water from my local fish stores show tank (owner was nice enough to give it to me) and 30% of new saltwater.

It is possible that my cycle has finished, however I did a 25% water change and my nitrates did not decrease. How can I make them go down to a reasonable level so I can start adding my first clownfish (live stock will be added slowly, but I want to have something in there to keep the tank healthy)

 

thanks everyone

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Mark1313

Look I'm new but I see some of my same impatience. Honestly I set my 6.6 up the same way, I used 100% lfs show tank water. Other then that, exactly the same. 

Your cycle may have finished, I didn't have much of one. 

 

To keep it healthy. Don't add anything. Let it run its natural course. Nitrates will lower with time. 

Way to early to add any fish. If it's desperate, seachem stability. Honestly though I wouldn't. 

 

At this point a wc will hurt your nitrates, not help. 

 

At your point, maybe a few coral and watch your parameters. Honestly you're safer doing nothing for a month or two. 

I spiked ammonia and whacked out a fish cause early, then another one cause I overfed my one and only fish. 

Enjoy the tank, chill, add a couple of simple coral amd see how they do. Don't rush this, you'll be happier, even with the nice start. 

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Thrassian Atoll

Once your tank is completely cycled do a 100% water change.  That will lower your nitrate.

 

I would add some ammonia and see if it goes away in 24 hrs.

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CinnamonTorch

Thank you guys for your inputs, I think adding coral would do more harm than a fish, since they consume many trace elements. However I also agree that coral would be a good start because they would not need to be fed immediately, sufficient light from my ai prime hd's should be enough to keep them going, and eventually I could start spot feeding for more growth but only when my water parameters would accept it.

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Pinner Reef

You water is cycled... that doesn't mean your rock is... Makes sure to wait 2 weeks before adding any fish. You can do a 50% waterchange to get the trates down

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Mark1313

You have a cuc? Any in mind? With live rock you could prolly add a few snails or a hermit ot 2 if that's your preference. If you don't see any algae for snails, throw em a wafer. Toss in some fish food twice a week? Least it's something to watch. 

The whole quick lfs water, rock, sand, sounded good to me but I rushed because of it. 

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Clown79

Your tank may have not gone through a cycle if it's cured liverock

 

To reduce nitrates 50% waterchange will drop it by half.

I'd start off with a small cuc

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gone_PHiSHin

5 days is a little early.  if you can add ammonia or fish food and have no ammonia or nitrites present the next day, then i would add a CUC and maybe a small fish.  

 

regardless if your cycle is complete or not, you will only lower your nitRATES by doing a large WC.  if you are producing nitrates, then that means you are processing ammonia.   if you are going to add a clown now without being sure your cycle is complete, then do a large water change first and monitor/test for ammonia at least twice a day, and have something like Seachem Prime ready.  

 

like already said, 5 days is probably too early, but your tank could very well be cycled.  if it is, a big WC and a CUC or fish needs to be the next step.  be certain first

 

 

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Clown79

Don't add pure ammonia to a tank with liverock to test the cycle. That should only be done with dry rock. 

 

Unfortunately it will kill off beneficial life within liverock.

 

Cured liverock- no cycle, it's cured

 

I've had liverock tanks set up and cycled within a week because it's liverock.

 

Dry rock- whole other story 

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Dougefresh35

Question is why are you worrying about the nitrate level at day 5 you should wait 3-4 weeks regardless if you have live rock or not in my opinion the nitrate level will come down on its own anyway and nitrate is not what kills fish anyhow its ammonia and nitrite that you have to worry about. Just my 1/2 cent.

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HM3105

you used live rock and live sand so you aren't going to see a normal cycle. You've already got the bacteria colonies established.

 

Feed the tank as if you had a couple of fish, see if the tank processes ammonia. 

 

If you don'to get any ammonia or nitrites, add livestock slowly, A CUC wouldn't be a bad idea to help consume the uneaten food.

 

You probably have very little in the tank that will use the nitrates (no coral no algae). Algae will come on first to consume the nitrates and phosphates, probably diatoms. You can do a WC to help lower both but honestly I wouldn't worry about it too much at this point.

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Clown79
14 hours ago, Dougefresh35 said:

Question is why are you worrying about the nitrate level at day 5 you should wait 3-4 weeks regardless if you have live rock or not in my opinion the nitrate level will come down on its own anyway and nitrate is not what kills fish anyhow its ammonia and nitrite that you have to worry about. Just my 1/2 cent.

Nitrate does not go down on it's own. It needs to be exported.

 

Once a tank has cycled, there is no need to wait, all that will occur is nutrient levels will continue to rise

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Dougefresh35
6 hours ago, Clown79 said:

Nitrate does not go down on it's own. It needs to be exported.

 

Once a tank has cycled, there is no need to wait, all that will occur is nutrient levels will continue to rise

Sorry no offenese but that is simply not true here is part of an artical from Dr. Foster and smith on how nitrate is converted into nitrogen gas and released into the air.

 

However, nature and more elaborate aquarium filtration systems continue to further break down nitrate. Within this stage of the nitrogen cycle, another bacteria set converts nitrate into nitrogen gas, which is then released at the water's surface and absorbed into the air. This natural process of nitrate removal from your aquarium is known as complete nitrification or de-nitrification.

 

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Clown79
3 hours ago, Dougefresh35 said:

Sorry no offenese but that is simply not true here is part of an artical from Dr. Foster and smith on how nitrate is converted into nitrogen gas and released into the air.

 

However, nature and more elaborate aquarium filtration systems continue to further break down nitrate. Within this stage of the nitrogen cycle, another bacteria set converts nitrate into nitrogen gas, which is then released at the water's surface and absorbed into the air. This natural process of nitrate removal from your aquarium is known as complete nitrification or de-nitrification.

 

You think it's not true.

 

Ok, don't do waterchanges, continue feeding, don't use a skimmer, refugium, or change your floss regularly - see if your nitrates go down on their own.

 

I'm sorry but EVERYONE recommends doing waterchanges to reduce nitrates and that's because they don't reduce on their own, if they did a lot of ppl's nutrient issue would be solved pretty easily.

 

And the op would be better off taking the advice of the numerous ppl who suggested doing a 50-100% waterchange then to just leave it to reduce on it's own because it won't!

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Figster
55 minutes ago, Clown79 said:

You think it's not true.

 

Ok, don't do waterchanges, continue feeding, don't use a skimmer, refugium, or change your floss regularly - see if your nitrates go down on their own.

 

I'm sorry but EVERYONE recommends doing waterchanges to reduce nitrates and that's because they don't reduce on their own, if they did a lot of ppl's nutrient issue would be solved pretty easily.

 

And the op would be better off taking the advice of the numerous ppl who suggested doing a 50-100% waterchange then to just leave it to reduce on it's own because it won't!

Clown is correct, though you are not wrong about nitrate turning into nitrogen, it happens at a very low level and only with either very dense LR or deep sand beds. But often our water produces much more nitrates than can be converted into nitrogen. So the “only” proven methods is export, either by water changes or consumption (algae).

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Dougefresh35
2 hours ago, Clown79 said:

You think it's not true.

 

Ok, don't do waterchanges, continue feeding, don't use a skimmer, refugium, or change your floss regularly - see if your nitrates go down on their own.

 

I'm sorry but EVERYONE recommends doing waterchanges to reduce nitrates and that's because they don't reduce on their own, if they did a lot of ppl's nutrient issue would be solved pretty easily.

 

And the op would be better off taking the advice of the numerous ppl who suggested doing a 50-100% waterchange then to just leave it to reduce on it's own because it won't!

Wow didnt mean to rub you the wrong way it was just my opinion that water changes wasnt the only way to reduce nitrates of course you should do water changes but it isnt the only way thats all I meant by it.

Sorry if I came off rude I wasn't trying to be.

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Clown79

You didn't rub me the wrong way. Nor did I consider your reply rude.

 

I am a blunt person, I get straight to the point, sorry if I came off defensive.

 

But I would like to see someone put their tank at risk and challenge the theory that nitrates will reduce on their own.

 

I won't do it. I've seen what happens after a month with nutrients when there is no exporting of it.

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AshCom
22 hours ago, Dougefresh35 said:

water changes wasnt the only way to reduce nitrates of course you should do water changes but it isnt the only way thats all I meant by it.

 

On 11/25/2017 at 12:35 AM, Clown79 said:

Nitrate does not go down on it's own. It needs to be exported.

 

You're both right and both wrong :lol: Nitrates can be somewhat limited by anaerobic bacteria that lies in deep, low flow areas of LR and 4"+ deep sand beds. So technically DF&S is correct but in no way should this be a substitute of doing WC. There are claims that rock like pukani can be a good host of this beneficial bacteria, traditionally found in deep sand beds (like stated above), because of its low flow but accessibility to water movement and gas exchange. However, there are products, like MarinePure, that claim to be able to host anaerobic bacteria in sump low-flow zones by providing a porous structure for water flow but still have high density. BRS did try to test this but they admitted their trials were flawed from the beginning and should be taken with a grain of salt.

 

Needless to say, ample amount of LR, deep sand beds, a fuge, and bacterial dosing with products like MicroBacter7 (for aerobic) and NO3:PO4-X (for anaerobic) can help control levels in the tank for nitrates, nitrites, phosphate, and organics but are only precautionary. Consistent testing of parameters, a water change schedule, and daily skimming are proven methods to reduce almost anything bad in an aquarium and are both precautionary and can be an emergency fix.

 

At the end of it all, reef husbandry is all about consistency. The oceans levels are near constant parameters and fluctuate slowly, while our home and business aquariums can change on a dime so proper scheduling and maintenance is key. 

 

I hope this helps summarize if someone stumbles across this one day with the same question! ;)

 

Edit:

Now nitrates that do not go down after a WC are probably from the new water itself, IMO! If you're using precycled LRS water, it almost is guaranteed to have nitrate in it, if its tap that is conditioned it's also from the water, and if its RODI water, I'd check it to be sure :happy: I use RODI checked with a TDS meter and a red sea marine test kit or green tab water jugs from walmart if I'm in a crunch!

 

You'll never know until you test it!

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