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Subsea

TOO Many tanks.

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At this moment, I have over 400G in my living room and three 150G outside growout Rubbermade tanks buried in the ground.  That is my newest project.  I was my intention of seeding dead rock and growing live food cultures of pods and macro algae.  In the case of Grape Caulerpa, I eat it as a delicacy both in ceviche and with sesame seed oil, soy sauce and lime juice.  As Justin Wilson would say, “Talk about good”.

 

Inside my living room/dining area are six tanks and soon to be a seventh.  A 55G tumble culture of Dragons Breath.  The second production tank is a 55G tumble culture of Gracilaria Hayi.  I have reduced the lighting by half on this tank, producing a dark burgundy color that I find attractive.  Two other 55G tanks are grow out for decorative macro (Red Grapes & Dragons Breath) and corals such as GSP & Green Sinularia.  My only display tank with a refugium is a 75G Jaubert Plenum with a 30G EcoSystem mud/macro refugium that has been set up 25 years.  Due to an infestation of Red Planarian, I have neglected this tank resulting in gha outbreak that was a real PITA to combat.  After diligent vacuuming and stirring the substrate, this tank has got back on track.  In my ethisiasm and renewed interest, I bought some gorgonions and tree sponges.  I have flame scallops and decorative yellow cucumbers that are closely related to sea apples in shipment. Coinciding with this new interest in filter feeders is my interest in cryptic zone filtration.  To that end;  I removed all macro algae in my refugium and composted tomatoes with it.  In my refugium now is dry rock with seeded sponges on live rock.  

 

This Hammer is on of my favorites.  A friend gifted me two branches of this just one year ago.  The Clowns agree with it being a favorite as they are hosting in it

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Outside grow out system consist  of three 150G Rubbermaid tanks that are buried in the ground. Tank number one at the bottom pumps to tank number three at the top, then water gravity feeds from 3 to 2 to 1 through 1 inch drain pipe at a flow rate of 250 GPHr.  Each tank has a MaxiJet 1200 for internal circulation at 300 GPHr.  Tank #3 has a Mag 12 circulating 1000GPHr thru a 40W UV sterilizer.  Tank #1 is full of third and fourth generation marine mollies with coarse aroggonite (crushed coral) to provide for pod hiding place.  Tank #2 has CaribSea Special Reef Grade aroggonite with 100lbs of dry rock on top of sand.  I will add 50lbs of uncured diver collected rock to this tank and 50lbs to tank #3.

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You do have a lot going on!  And that is a nice Hammer, for sure.

 

Just wondering how you keep the outside tubs warm enough in the winter.

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In the past, when I attempted maintaining reef inhabitants, the heating bill was too much.  At that time, I was trying to maintain water temperature at 70 degrees using resistive heaters and plastic frame over tanks at night.  Even now with mild weather, temperature fluctuates at least 12 degrees.  To solve that delima, I have changed what I cultivate.  I am trying different macros like Grape Caulerpa, Caulerpa Proliferate and cold hardy pods.  The 100lbs of uncured live rock coming in will seed this system with micro fauna and fana, then the live rock goes into a new 120G build shortly after Halloween.  

 

For this winter, I will target 55 degrees as my minimum temperature.  I feel that cold temperatures will slow everything down but not kill it.  When days are cold, I will leave plastic cover over tanks day and night, in addition to resistive heaters set to 55 degrees.  I am installing a watt meter on this system to monitor electrical expense.

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On 10/16/2017 at 6:57 PM, Subsea said:

In the past, when I attempted maintaining reef inhabitants, the heating bill was too much.  At that time, I was trying to maintain water temperature at 70 degrees using resistive heaters and plastic frame over tanks at night.  Even now with mild weather, temperature fluctuates at least 12 degrees.  To solve that delima, I have changed what I cultivate.  I am trying different macros like Grape Caulerpa, Caulerpa Proliferate and cold hardy pods.  The 100lbs of uncured live rock coming in will seed this system with micro fauna and fana, then the live rock goes into a new 120G build shortly after Halloween.  

 

For this winter, I will target 55 degrees as my minimum temperature.  I feel that cold temperatures will slow everything down but not kill it.  When days are cold, I will leave plastic cover over tanks day and night, in addition to resistive heaters set to 55 degrees.  I am installing a watt meter on this system to monitor electrical expense.

 

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Not sure what happened with the double post.

 

Yesterday, I received 100lbs of Gulf live rock.  Most went into outside Rubbermade tanks.  

 

I brought a few few rocks to inside tanks. First picture is a red tree sponge in 55G growout tank.

 

The gorgonions in this second picture was too tall for water in Rubbermade tanks.

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At 5PM yesterday evening, 30 lbs of nano rock and 60 lbs of delux premium rock were placed in Rubbermade tanks.  Temperature was at 82 degrees.  As we have had clear skies with much nighttime convection cooling.   I put two 300W heaters each in tank #1 &#2,  In the morning, temperature was 74 at 8AM.  The day before, the low temperature was 68 with a high of 80 degrees.

 

i will pamper this tank with temperature control until live rock has cured and 120G new build is ready for rock.  Sometime between Halloween and Thanksgiving.

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Some live rock moved to 75G Jaubert Plenum.  I also bought yellow cucumbers, flame scallops and a flame angel.  I worry about this dwarf angel.  After 48 hours, it is finally  grazing on newly introduced live rock.

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What made you get into all of the filter feeders and algae?  Pretty cool though.

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Working in the oilfield with a 28 day on and 28  day off schedule, I developed an extended remote refugium for a 150G mixed garden reef tank.   Half of the garage belonged to the wife.  The other half became an extended refugium and grow out system.  Two 55G macro/pod refugium, then two 4’ by 8’ by 6” high growout troughs.  When I would arrive home after a work hitch, I would feed heavily and I saw a corresspong increase in pods and macro.  When I was gone for a 28 day work shift, the pod and macros feed tank

 

 When I was reading up on best refugium macro, Anthony Calfo mentioned Red Ogo as one of the three best refugium macros.  Open pursuing this further, I realized it was also called Tang Heaven Red at IndoPacific SeaFarm.  So I grew it in a tumble culture.  On another hobbiest forum, I mentioned eating Red Ogo from my refugium and a chef fron Kansa City asked me what I did with the pods in the ogo..  I said sushi.  I heard him laugh from Kansas.

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4 minutes ago, Subsea said:

Working in the oilfield with a 28 day on and 28  day off schedule, I developed an extended remote refugium for a 150G mixed garden reef tank.   Half of the garage belonged to the wife.  The other half became an extended refugium and grow out system.  Two 55G macro/pod refugium, then two 4’ by 8’ by 6” high growout troughs.  When I would arrive home after a work hitch, I would feed heavily and I saw a corresspong increase in pods and macro.  When I was gone for a 28 day work shift, the pod and macros feed tank

 

 When I was reading up on best refugium macro, Anthony Calfo mentioned Red Ogo as one of the three best refugium macros.  Open pursuing this further, I realized it was also called Tang Heaven Red at IndoPacific SeaFarm.  So I grew it in a tumble culture.  On another hobbiest forum, I mentioned eating Red Ogo from my refugium and a chef fron Kansa City asked me what I did with the pods in the ogo..  I said sushi.  I heard him laugh from Kansas.

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Thats awesome man!  Thanks for the story.

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Lights just went out on this 55G growout tank.  It is 4:30PM with subdued light coming in from east window.  In the morning, I love the sun beams with its glimmer lines.

 

Some new Gulf live rock.  I don’t know what this red looking sponge like thing is, but Cerith snails are working on it.

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It's crazy how the first tank cost so much or gives you a bit of sticker shock, then it blooms into multiple tanks. How's the electric Bill? 

Cool idea buring the tanks 

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Too early to tell on the electric bill.  It is a lot of tanks in living area.  In fact, to condition air, I installed a 2 ton ductless split unit with a 20.5 SEER in the living dining area.  I then use the circulating fan for the central unit to move conditioned air to the whole house.

 

Prior to receiving diver collected Gulf live rock on Wed, I noted 12 degree temperature difference on tanks in ground.  With 48 degree air temperature, tank temperature got down to 68 degrees.  On Wed when rock was put in at 5PM, the water temperature was 82 degrees.  I added two 300W resistive thermostate heaters.  In the morning, water temperature was 76 degrees.   My goal is to set thermostats at 60 degrees.  I will  wait until after this Gulf live  rock is placed in my 120G new build.

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Flower anemone is a survivor.  It came on some diver collected rock 7 years  ago.   Due to stuck ATO, a 500G system became diluted to fresh water.  It looked like mush.  Not so today.  It is gorgeous.

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This live rock is one week from having been in 30’ of water in the Gulf of Mexico.  I receivd this rock with a 90 lb  shipment on Wed PM.  It is delux premium rock at $5/lb.   COD air freight cost $100 for first 100 lbs then $.45/lb for everything over 100 lbs.

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Diver collected rock, one week from being in Gulf if Mexico.  Except for the rock on left.  It was also from Gulf live rock, but was collected 7 years ago.  Due to neglect on my part, this rock became infested with Red Planaria and Aptasia. I exterminated Red Planaria, pods and micro stars with a 10% hydrogen peroxide bath for 10 minutes then a ten fold concentration of flatworm X for 30 minutes.   Using a combination of toothbrush with hydrogen peroxide and Aptasia X I am making headway with Eli inaction of Aptasia.  I am also waiting on shipment of peppermint shrimp for biological control.

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I really like this lacy green macro.

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This 150G  tank has 60 lbs of larger diver collected rock on top with 100 lbs of sun bleached rock underneath with 100 lbs of CaribSea “special reef grade” aroggonite.  When I spoke with Dan at Gulf live rock,  I told him what tank size.  On a 4’ by 2’ by 2’ tank I wanted two large structures with large open spaces for 50 Blue Yellow Tail Damsels.  

 

I intended to have much ornamental macros in this 120G build.  I especially like the color contrast of red and green.  I do it with macros like Grape  Caulerpa and Bortycladia, Red Grapes.  Other favorite reds are Gracilaria Hayi, when subjected to reduced lighting takes on a dark burgundy color.   My favorite is Dragons Tongue, Halymenia dilatata.

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Photoadaptability of red macro to light intensity.  Note the dark burgundy color of the Gracilaria Hayi and Bortacladia.  Both were removed from low light areas.  When I receive red grapes from the divers, it is a rich dark burgundy.  Consider that it is collected in 60-120’ of water.  Not very bright at that depth.  When red grapes are moved from low light to intense light, the dark burgundy pales to a light pink and flotation berries float off.   Not very pretty.

 

Halymenia dilatata is an intense light lover that grows fast.  I am presently growing some in a tumble culture.  Note the many red flotation berries in bright light on eggcrate platform..  I moved an acrylic bracket with 4” high Bortacladia into another tank with brighter light with good response.

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Outside aquaculture with three 150G Rubbermade tanks sunk in ground.  Tank #1 has 30 third generation salt water mixed mollies.  This tank has one MaxiJet 1200 for internal circulation and one MaxiJet to circulate through the three tanks.  Tank #2 is in the second picture.  On top of this tank is 60lbs of uncured Gulf live rock.  Internal circulation provided by one MaxiJet 1200 and flow through rate of about 250 GPHr.  Both tank #1 & #2 have 300W resistive heaters.  With a morning air temperature of 36 degrees and a water temperature of 66 degrees, I felt that I had established my base line of heat input required.

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Green Star long Polyps

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On 10/18/2017 at 10:33 PM, TILTON said:

What made you get into all of the filter feeders and algae?  Pretty cool though.

I thought more about my reason to go with filter feeders and decorative macro.  It is easier to maintain and less expensive to set up are two reasons.   The more important reason is because I like to see nature work it’s miracles.   When interconnecting and interdependent food webs recycle nutrients, the results are a source of live food for reef inhabitants.  Instead of nutrient export with water changes, gravel vacume,  or skimmate let your nutrient sink be decorative macros that can be pruned and sold as nutrient export.  The same thing works for coral or fish.  

 

 

My kind of reef keeping will not appeal to someone that needs to see an immaculate tank. 

Viva la difference.

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Sea Apples are a favorite

 

These two came in with a third scallop one week ago.  The third is in a cave in back of tank.  These two hid behind a sponge filter attached to Mag 7, which I just did remove.  It was my intention to shade this side of tank for introduction of NPS gorgonions.

 

The Red Tree Sponges have finally quite sluffing off mucus and are showing red.  This large Green Sinularia will be removed from this tank to make room for more filter feeders.

 

I am tickled pink with Flame Angel rising from the ashes like the Phoenix.  It came in on the same shipment as the Flame Scallops.  It was laying on its side breathing fast in the bag.  First thought was either amonia or low oxygen.  I equalized temperature and released fish into tank in 5 minutes.  For two days it refused to eat and in general was lethargic.  Two days later, I received uncured live rock and put a few pieces in this 75G Jaubert Plenum display tank the second night.  Come next morning Flame Angel is grazing on live rock.  Go figure.

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