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Any Experience? - Griessingei Goby Advice

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Cannedfish

I need some advice.

 

Our little tank, despite my best efforts, seems to be humming along. Currently, it is stocked with Blenwood the tail spot blenny (TSB) and the yet-to-be-named possum wrasse (PW) (thinking about naming her Penelope?). The original plan was to add one last fish, a shrimp goby (most likely a yasha or orange stripe), however, unlike a teenage boy, we have wanted to take our time fully stocking. Recently, Blen-Daddy and the PW, seem to have become buddies. They swim around together; they to steal the dedros' food together; they snap adorably annoying selfies together eating ice cream and post them with dumb hashtags like #besties, #foodies, and #blessed (get a life... and a job, millennials). As a result, I have kinda soured on the idea of adding a true shrimp goby to the dynamic. 1) because, I think Blenwood, although he would never admit it, is a bit of the jealous type, and 2) because PW is just too pretty for her own good. Specifically, I fear a third fish could make things... awkward. While this would, admittedly, make a great reality TV show, the tank is to small for a confessional both, and our kitchen was poorly designed and is too small to comfortable fit a film crew. I am, however, intrigued by the idea of adding a Griessingei Goby. These saucy little guys seem to check all the right boxes: 1) small; 2) quiet; 3) low bio-load; 4) flamboyantly fun-looking. Basically, they appears as though Evolution at some point got bored, had a few too many cold-ones, drunk dialed RuPaul and Cirque du Soleil, and was like "betcha won't."

 

Anyways, everything I have read says I will never seem them and they aren't worth it. Does anyone have experience with them? Or any thoughts about adding one? Feel free to comment, or tell me to shut up and write less, or even suggest possum wrasse names. 

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fishkeepersaltnfresh

I hear you. I "sort of" have the same issue. My tank has a clownfish and a Yellow watchman Goby. Over the last month, they have become best buddies. They stay near each other. Share the same space as their den. Clownfish would be swimming around YWG while YWG hovers over sand. I am thinking of getting a 3rd fish. Initially though of getting another clown. But now I am afraid to break up their partnership. Other options that I am evaluating are possum wrasse (but none of the local stores have one) or a Bangai cardinal....

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Cannedfish
On 10/13/2017 at 10:06 AM, fishkeepersaltnfresh said:

Other options that I am evaluating are possum wrasse (but none of the local stores have one) or a Bangai cardinal....

 

If looking for a Possum Wrasse I would just camp out on Diver's Den, they come up pretty frequently. 

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RayWhisperer

I've had them. Tiny little fish. Just in case you were thinking they are small, they are tiny. Like smaller than a neon cleaner goby tiny.

 

Surprisingly, not a difficult fish. Though, mine never ate prepared food. That didn't stop them from coming out to investigate when something smelled good.

 

Singly, they are very shy. I'd see the single scoot from one rock to another, once every few days. Mostly in the morning before the lights came on. However, as a large group, it's a whole different animal. When you keep 4 or more, they are out much more often. I had 3, then got 2 more, and it was night and day. As a group, they will be out displaying to each other. Provided they feel secure. Which would probably come in time.

 

That being said, don't try a pair. Well, maybe just don't try to pair them yourself. That's how I ended up with the single. 

 

Any specific questions, ask away.

 

also. Naming fish is stupid. I've had one fish in 35+ years I've named. It was named Oscar. Can you guess what kind of fish it was?

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Rene
1 hour ago, RayWhisperer said:

Also. Naming fish is stupid. I've had one fish in 35+ years I've named. It was named Oscar. Can you guess what kind of fish it was?

I don't even have fish. My boyfriend has named the coral instead. I have Xenia: Warrior Coral. 

 

Guess what kind of coral it is. 

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Cannedfish

@RayWhisperer I sincerely appreciate the advice, I know it might sound lame, but that fact you took the time to share your experiences is what makes this forum so powerful. I think this is an aspect of the community doesn't get expressed enough, especially regarding those individuals with a wealth of knowledge.

 

My questions essentially boil down to (if not a bit inhumane): from your experience with the species, are they worth the price (i.e. will I ever see it,; will it live long enough to appreciate it)? I only have 10 gallons to work with, and don't have the luxury to increase size. Ideally, I want to maximize that space. It may be asking a lot, but I want something unique, interesting, and beautiful, not for ego, bragging, or anything else but to make and keep the hobby interesting from a personal standpoint. (PS the lady wants a gumdrop coral croucher) 

 

Lastly, I agree to disagree regarding fish names, anthropomorphizing fish (especially, when you only have two) makes things  light and humorous, which I find is half the battle. 

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Cannedfish
18 minutes ago, Rene said:

I don't even have fish. My boyfriend has named the coral instead. I have Xenia: Warrior Coral. 

 

Guess what kind of coral it is. 

 Damnit! How have I not thought of that?! Give that man an old timey 'slaps five' on my behalf! 

 

I'm going to have to go reexamine what I've been doing with my life, I'm definitely off my game. 

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1.0reef

I'd a Trimma or Eviota goby instead, plenty of uncommon species to choose from and they tend to be a bit less cryptic. 

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RayWhisperer

Well, price is subjective. I'd never pay $90 for a fish. That's just me, though. Luckily, I've been at this for so long, I know a lot of people in the industry. I think I paid $30 each for mine. So, cost...

 

as for lifespan. Mine made it for probably just shy of 2 years before they were never seen again. So, considering the unique beauty of these little fish. Having the pleasure of seeing them up close for nearly 2 years was well worth everything to me. However, keeping just 1, you'd get far more viewing pleasure from a coral croucher.

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fishkeepersaltnfresh

Agree with the above comments. Just love my YWG perched over candy cane

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RayWhisperer

Just a thought, if you were interested in other fish. Considering size constraints, as well as bio load, figuring in something unique, and beautiful as well. These "specs" really help to narrow down the list of possible contenders. While gum drops, trimmas, shrimp gobys, assessors are all great fish. I think I have something that will really get you interested.

 

Blue stripe pipefish. This fish has the cool and beauty factor in spades. The bio load of the fish itself is minimal. The only downsides in your case are tank size and difficulty. I'll address difficulty first, as it seems to have a reputation. As far as pipes are concerned, blue stripes are the easiest of the group. They are hardy, and acclimate to tank life fairly well. The biggest problem is feeding. They are pretty much like a mandarin where that is concerned. However, provided you have a moderate pod population and plenty of live rock, they'll easily get by with some frozen brine 3 times a week. Fish roe works pretty well, too. It's mostly just a matter of them recognizing it as food. Having other fish in there as you do, I find this actually helps. They see other fish eating, and pick it up pretty quickly.

 

All that said, tank size is your biggest obstacle with these fish. They are active when they are comfortable. Not active like a chromis, more like a mandy again. Very deliberate and methodical. Normally, I'd suggest a minimum of 30 gallons for this fish. Not so much due to size, or activity. More so for the ability to produce adequate pods for food. However, again, if you have plenty of rock, that should suffice.

 

One of these would far exceed any gressingeri, or gum drop as a candidate just for its uniqueness. However, it will also be far more active than either of those, as well. Plus, Mose fish seem to leave them alone. I think it has to do with their shape and swimming behavior. Other fish don't seem to recognize it as a fish. Mine would swim right through my nesting clowns and they never once even so much as displayed towards it. Plus, they are far cheaper than a gresingeri.

 

 

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hinnenkm

I second the pipefish - and am actually considering adding at least one, possibly two to my nuvo 10. I've had pipes in the past and they are some of my absolute favorite fish and if you're willing to do the work that it might take to get them to eat, they are well, well worth it!

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Rene

I've wanted a blue-stripe for years, but have a pico and no experience with challenging fish, so it's not happening. But having seen them in person, they're enchanting. 

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RayWhisperer
1 hour ago, hinnenkm said:

I second the pipefish - and am actually considering adding at least one, possibly two to my nuvo 10. I've had pipes in the past and they are some of my absolute favorite fish and if you're willing to do the work that it might take to get them to eat, they are well, well worth it!

Careful with a pair. They may be the easiest of the pipes, but they are also one of the most intolerant of others. If you're set on a pair, I'd suggest getting a pair that is already bonded. It's no guarantee, but you'll have better success than trying to sex two fish and hope they pair up.

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hinnenkm
2 hours ago, RayWhisperer said:

Careful with a pair. They may be the easiest of the pipes, but they are also one of the most intolerant of others. If you're set on a pair, I'd suggest getting a pair that is already bonded. It's no guarantee, but you'll have better success than trying to sex two fish and hope they pair up.

Yup, thanks for the advice. That is what I had researched and I will take my chances when and if I get them, because if it doesn't work out, I have another tank one of them could go in :)

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Cannedfish
On 10/25/2017 at 7:13 AM, RayWhisperer said:

 I think I paid $30 each for mine. So, cost...

 

I wish I knew your sources, if I could find them for even $50/fish this wouldn't be an issue. But after what you said about the benefits of a small group, I think I would need/want at minimum three, and at $100 a pop... I might as well get a candy basslet, or a new car... While, we have some great LFS's in NOLA, we don't get too many unusual fish, so it's doubtful these would ever come in or be at an even close to reasonable price, so I would have to suck it up and pay the DD premium. 

 

16 hours ago, RayWhisperer said:

Just a thought, if you were interested in other fish. Considering size constraints, as well as bio load, figuring in something unique, and beautiful as well. These "specs" really help to narrow down the list of possible contenders. While gum drops, trimmas, shrimp gobys, assessors are all great fish. I think I have something that will really get you interested.

 

Blue stripe pipefish. This fish has the cool and beauty factor in spades.

 

Again, I appreciate your taking the time to help me with this. I know there seems to always seems to be a flood of "What fish should I get?" threads that all seem to be the same ("Royal gramma or pair of clowns?"... "Can I put a beluga whale in a 5 gallon?"...), but having spent significant time contemplating this choice I have been stumped. It seems you have put some significant effort in helping solve this problem, so thank you. 

 

To be honest, I have always liked and found pipe fish to be interesting,  but have had major concerns whether, 1) my tank is too small (both in terms of swimming and having personal space), and 2) that I would adequately be able keep it fed. Although, I do have an appreciable amount rock, having an already pod-greedy little possum wrasse, I have hesitations whether there would be enough pods to go around, especially if the pipefish was a finicky eater. I do supplement tigger-pods a couple times a week, but I'm not convinced they are establishing any kind of significant population in the tank. An additional concern is how they tolerate flow? I have read some pipefish and seahorses do not love strong water flow, and while my tank isn't exactly a reef crest, there is some water movement. I don't mean come across as a wet blanket, however, I want to ensure that I can provide, while maybe not perfect, a environment in which any fish will be fat, happy, and stress free. 

 

Those concerns aside, I agree that the blue stripe seems to check every box (except maybe the beluga whale box): 1) active, 2) colorful, 3) unusual, and 4) looks like a dart. Until you brought it up, I was unaware not only how small but also how beautiful there are. Additionally, their eyes seem to give them an inquisitive look (which is a huge plus), and the price isn't oppressive. If you have a source, however, on reasonable candy basslets (or a beluga whale), let me know. 

 

16 hours ago, hinnenkm said:

I second the pipefish - and am actually considering adding at least one, possibly two to my nuvo 10. I've had pipes in the past and they are some of my absolute favorite fish and if you're willing to do the work that it might take to get them to eat, they are well, well worth it!

 

Its always a plus to hear strong reviews of a species. That being said, how much work are we talking about to get them to eat? I'm willing to do some crazy things, but if we're talking baby-birding them, I might be out... or maybe I'll just have to think about it. 

 

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hinnenkm
22 minutes ago, Cannedfish said:

 

I wish I knew your sources, if I could find them for even $50/fish this wouldn't be an issue. But after what you said about the benefits of a small group, I think I would need/want at minimum three, and at $100 a pop... I might as well get a candy basslet, or a new car... While, we have some great LFS's in NOLA, we don't get too many unusual fish, so it's doubtful these would ever come in or be at an even close to reasonable price, so I would have to suck it up and pay the DD premium. 

 

 

Again, I appreciate your taking the time to help me with this. I know there seems to always seems to be a flood of "What fish should I get?" threads that all seem to be the same ("Royal gramma or pair of clowns?"... "Can I put a beluga whale in a 5 gallon?"...), but having spent significant time contemplating this choice I have been stumped. It seems you have put some significant effort in helping solve this problem, so thank you. 

 

To be honest, I have always liked and found pipe fish to be interesting,  but have had major concerns whether, 1) my tank is too small (both in terms of swimming and having personal space), and 2) that I would adequately be able keep it fed. Although, I do have an appreciable amount rock, having an already pod-greedy little possum wrasse, I have hesitations whether there would be enough pods to go around, especially if the pipefish was a finicky eater. I do supplement tigger-pods a couple times a week, but I'm not convinced they are establishing any kind of significant population in the tank. An additional concern is how they tolerate flow? I have read some pipefish and seahorses do not love strong water flow, and while my tank isn't exactly a reef crest, there is some water movement. I don't mean come across as a wet blanket, however, I want to ensure that I can provide, while maybe not perfect, a environment in which any fish will be fat, happy, and stress free. 

 

Those concerns aside, I agree that the blue stripe seems to check every box (except maybe the beluga whale box): 1) active, 2) colorful, 3) unusual, and 4) looks like a dart. Until you brought it up, I was unaware not only how small but also how beautiful there are. Additionally, their eyes seem to give them an inquisitive look (which is a huge plus), and the price isn't oppressive. If you have a source, however, on reasonable candy basslets (or a beluga whale), let me know. 

 

 

Its always a plus to hear strong reviews of a species. That being said, how much work are we talking about to get them to eat? I'm willing to do some crazy things, but if we're talking baby-birding them, I might be out... or maybe I'll just have to think about it. 

 

Can't say it's as much work as baby-birding them, but there might be some baby brine shrimp involved. To be honest, I've had a great deal of luck by using nutramar ova and nanoV 'soft freeze' zooplankton. If they don't accept the frozen though, and I've done this with dragonets as well, hatching baby brine and mixing it with frozen as you do your feedings tends to trick them into eating the food that's not alive... 

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RayWhisperer

Yeah, considering you already have a possum wrasse, we're pushing it with the pipe. Sorry, I didn't think of that outright. Food availability in such a small environment would probably be an issue. And though possums are pretty timid, an established possum would out compete a pipe. 

 

I'll ponder on this a while. See what I can come up with. If you only had 30 more gallons to work with... I'd have a slew of cool fish to try...

 

 

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RayWhisperer

How bout a wasp fish? Certainly not in the active category, however, it has a lit of other attributes. Unfortunately, I have no personal experience with them. I know they can be difficult to get eating prepared foods. However, it doesn't directly compete for food with either of your fish. Plus, both of your fish are too big to be on the menu.

 

As for my sources, I don't do others favors. That's one of the reasons my sources don't mind hooking me up. Other people hate it. However, I won't risk years of friendship, or someone's job over saving someone a few bucks. That being said. Though I can't say I've seen a beluga whale come through, I did see an amazon dolphin. They got it for a public aquarium, who, I think, backed out of the deal. Had you contacted me sooner, I MIGHT have been able to work you into a deal.

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RayWhisperer

While your "specs" may narrow the list, it's also difficult to find suitable candidates. I've seen some true oddballs, but unfortunately, they are usually a once in a lifetime, require a bigger tank, require their own tank, or are just way too expensive. Having said all that, here's the shortlist with pictures.

 

blue stipe pipefish. I've already posted most everything you need to know, and provided an image. The one question I failed to answer was flow. These are reef pipefish. They can handle quite a bit of flow. That said, you can't crank an MP10 at maximum on reefcrest and expect a small swimmer to live. To give you some idea, my last one was in a 37 gallon with probably around 700 to 1000 gph of flow. The tank had a MJ1200 and a Jeabo WP 25 at 60 to 75% on standing wave mode. The pipe did fine in that.

 

Waspfish. Like I said before, I don't know much on these guys. Divers Den has a few of them on occasion. There are many different species, I just chose an image of the nicest looking species I've ever seen for sale. There are better looking ones, I've just never seen them for sale anywhere.

 

Yellow assessor, AKA gold assessor. While it doesn't exactly scream unique, it's still a really cool little fish. I've had one in every tank I've set up in the last 6 or 7 years. They are somewhat plain in color, but they make up in other areas. I call them the "surprise fish" because they stay hidden a lot. Not like a single gressingeri, mind you. You'll see this fish most when the lights are ramping up or down, and at feeding times.beyond that, it'll just make random appearances through the day. The really cool thing about these guys is the way they swim or suspend. They'll swim normal, upside down, on their side, facing up, or down. Easy fish to keep. Long lived (my last one is still in the display at the LFS. It's been at least 3.5 years since I bought it at full grown size.) Not a picky eater, and very peaceful.

 

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Cannedfish
On 10/24/2017 at 8:33 PM, RayWhisperer said:

Singly, they are very shy. I'd see the single scoot from one rock to another, once every few days. Mostly in the morning before the lights came on. However, as a large group, it's a whole different animal. When you keep 4 or more, they are out much more often. I had 3, then got 2 more, and it was night and day. As a group, they will be out displaying to each other. Provided they feel secure. Which would probably come in time.

Sorry to keep peppering you with questions, but i appreciate your experience. You mentioned you how you upped the number to a small group and the personality of the fish changed. First, how large of tank did you have them in? Do you think the size of the tank made a difference in the behavior of the group (i.e. a group of three would act similar to the group of five in a smaller tank). Next, do you think three could coexist peacefully in a 10 gallon (with a tail spot & a possum wrasse). Or do you think this is too small,  too much bio load, or not enough of them? Lastly, would having three be a bad number. Meaning that it is both too few (to get the group behavior), and too many (where they will fight), similar to cichlid tanks where the fish are happier by themselves or in pairs or when there are so many in the tank that no one fish can dominate. 

 

I have also been attempting to find the waspfish you mentioned, however, it seems they are few and far between. 

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RayWhisperer

I can't say for sure how 3 in a 10 would work out. Of all the gressingeri I had, I started with 2 in a 7.5 gallon. They didn't tolerate each other, and that's how I ended up with one. After that, I had 3 in a 40something gallon tank. They were extremely shy, and didn't interact with each other at all, from what I observed. Within a month of adding 2 more, they were all concentrated within  about 10" of each other. They would come out from hiding and display to each other right out in the open pretty regularly after that.

 

So, i really can't say how 3 in a 10 would work for you. I would guess that it would be enough space, and rock work, to allow peaceful coexistence. I'm just not too sure about the interaction.

 

As for your takmates.... both are small. However, blennies are notoriously intolerant of similar looking fish, and wrasses are pretty opportunistic. Being that tailspots are very small, I'd guess you'd be ok. I know possums are small and peaceful, but gressingeri are tiny. I'd say if your possum doesn't show interest in a sexy shrimp, you'd probably be fine. (A sexy is a far cheaper test than a gressingeri.) And no. I don't think adding 3 to your 10 would significantly increase your bio load. Without writing paragraphs of just how low impact these fish are. I'll say this. After having 7 of them, I can honestly say, I have never even seen a single turd. 

 

Waspfish are pretty uncommon. They seem to be seasonal. Unfortunately, I don't remember what season they usually come around. I do think it's winter, though.

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Cannedfish
9 hours ago, RayWhisperer said:

Without writing paragraphs of just how low impact these fish are. I'll say this. After having 7 of them, I can honestly say, I have never even seen a single turd. 

 

 

Again, thank you for taking the time to lend your experience, I really appreciate it. To be honest I kinda wish the possum wrasse would put the sexy shrimp in their place. Out of all the inverts I have had, they have been the most misbehaved. They seem intent, no matter how much they are target fed, to pick at and piss off every coral in the tank. Luckily, they also seem to have shrimp ADD and can't seem to focus on one coral long enough to do any significant harm. 

 

On another note, out of all the many, many "will this be too many fish (etc.)" questions I have read on this site, that might be the single best answer. Touche. 

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RayWhisperer

If you have room, get a cheapo maxi mini anemone. Those sexys won't nibble on anything else. Mine parked on the maxi mini and stayed there. The only reason they'd leave it was feeding time.

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