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GenericReefer

How do people get corals to grow so close to each other?

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GenericReefer

When we search up reef tanks, we see tanks packed with corals, with no rock being visible. How is it that they achieve this? I don't plan to have a tank like theirs as of now, but am curious as to how they accomplish that. Frequent water changes? Individual feedings?  A toxin remover?

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GunslingerGirl

Careful planning. I wouldn't put a euphyllia next to my zoas.

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Farmboyreef

I agree with @GunslingerGirl.  Careful planning.  Also keep in mind that many times the photos don't show some space that would be there between corals.  But you need to research to see what types of corals are compatible and can be placed next to each other.

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Thrassian Atoll

Going to be tricky.  One of my Acros fell on top of one my monti caps last night and the monti is dead where the acro was touching it.  

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kinetic

I noticed tanks that are dominated by corals just don't start with a lot of live rock. Let corals grow out, and don't have too many pieces. I know mostly about SPS, and they can touch and battle it out at the borders, but they usually won't destroy the other colony (depends on the coral).

 

If you have mixed LPS/SPS, then you need to be careful. LPS can send out stingers pretty much all the way across a tank...

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HarryPotter
1 hour ago, GenericReefer said:

When we search up reef tanks, we see tanks packed with corals, with no rock being visible. How is it that they achieve this? I don't plan to have a tank like theirs as of now, but am curious as to how they accomplish that. Frequent water changes? Individual feedings?  A toxin remover?

 

 

I consider my tank to be packed since corals are constantly fighting and stinging each other. 

 

No individual feeding, very infrequent water changes (monthly), and no chemicals beside Ca:Alk. 

 

A packed tank is from stability, giving the corals a few years to grow, and the more rockless look can be achieved by using rods and epoxy/glue with smaller pieces of rock to achieve the height you want.

 

A handful of my corals have a dead head where they rub against another species, I just leave it be. That’s nature for ya.  

 

nvJVf16.jpg

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GenericReefer
Just now, HarryPotter said:

 

 

I consider my tank to be packed since corals are constantly fighting and stinging each other. 

 

No individual feeding, very infrequent water changes (monthly), and no chemicals beside Ca:Alk. 

 

A packed tank is from stability, giving the corals a few years to grow, and the more rockless look can be achieved by using rods and epoxy/glue with smaller pieces of rock to achieve the height you want.

 

How have you gotten away with monthly water changes?  

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HarryPotter
2 minutes ago, GenericReefer said:

How have you gotten away with monthly water changes?  

 

If the tank is lucky it gets monthly water changes, lol! I feed a cube of food every 3-5ish days, which keeps nutrients at a bare minimum- my hard corals love it and my clownfish can tolerate that. 

 

The corals suck up Calcium and Alkalinity, so I replace it via dosing. 

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Farmboyreef
2 minutes ago, GenericReefer said:

How have you gotten away with monthly water changes?  

If you’re exporting nutrients properly and replenishing elements, water changes aren’t needed. They’re actually a poor solution for nutrient reduction/export unless you’re changing large amounts (greater than 50%). 

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GenericReefer

In theory, would monthly water changes in a 10g system work, if dosing was implemented?

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HarryPotter
4 minutes ago, GenericReefer said:

In theory, would monthly water changes in a 10g system work, if dosing was implemented?

 

 

Totally depends. Water changes are the easiest way to make your water high quality. If you want to do fewer water changes you need to make sure that your nutrients do not go up; that can easily crash the tank. I suggest starting with a 25% water change every two weeks, and then by looking at your corals health and tank parameters you can infer whether you can start going longer in between changes. 

 

But for the the first few months, definitely a good idea to do water changes at least other week. Don’t want corals or fish to die from a spike (or lack) of something. 

 

Testing is also a must to know what you need to replenish. 

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pj86
4 minutes ago, GenericReefer said:

In theory, would monthly water changes in a 10g system work, if dosing was implemented?

Jumping in on this. Dosing is implemented to keep water chemistry stable. If done incorrectly water changes can undue this chemical balance. 

 

Like @HarryPotter had mentioned, testing water parameters before and after water changes will be important, mainly for the delicate corals. 

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GenericReefer

Thanks for all the advice! :D

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graftobny142
1 hour ago, GenericReefer said:

In theory, would monthly water changes in a 10g system work, if dosing was implemented?

Just do a weekly change, not hard at all to change 2.5g of a 10g system. 

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mr9iron
2 hours ago, Farmboyreef said:

If you’re exporting nutrients properly and replenishing elements, water changes aren’t needed. They’re actually a poor solution for nutrient reduction/export unless you’re changing large amounts (greater than 50%). 

I'm curious if you could provide me information about this statement.  Are you saying a fuge, chemical media for export?  Why do water changes less than 50% or greater not work well?

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Farmboyreef
3 minutes ago, mr9iron said:

I'm curious if you could provide me information about this statement.  Are you saying a fuge, chemical media for export?  Why do water changes less than 50% or greater not work well?

Let’s say you have a 20 gallon tank and your nitrates are 20 and you want to reduce them as you’re having problems with algae or whatever. You do a 25% water change weekly.  That’s only going to reduce your nitrates by 5 to 15 - which is most likely not going to change things up. In order to make an impact, you’d need to change out 50% to bring down to 10. And if you want to then bring to 5, you would need to do another 50% change and so on. So nutrient management via effective protein skimming, fuge etc is going to b much more effective than standard 10-20% water changes. 

 

Water changes are essential, don’t get me wrong. Unless you’re dosing trace elements, you need to replenish what your tank will need via fresh salt water. Hope that helps explain. 

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Clown79

Careful planning of what can by placed near one another and simply, time.

 

Eventually they grow.

 

You won't get the full reef look with frags until they grow into colonies.

 

If you buy colony pieces then you can achieve the full look.

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mr9iron
5 hours ago, Farmboyreef said:

Let’s say you have a 20 gallon tank and your nitrates are 20 and you want to reduce them as you’re having problems with algae or whatever. You do a 25% water change weekly.  That’s only going to reduce your nitrates by 5 to 15 - which is most likely not going to change things up. In order to make an impact, you’d need to change out 50% to bring down to 10. And if you want to then bring to 5, you would need to do another 50% change and so on. So nutrient management via effective protein skimming, fuge etc is going to b much more effective than standard 10-20% water changes. 

 

Water changes are essential, don’t get me wrong. Unless you’re dosing trace elements, you need to replenish what your tank will need via fresh salt water. Hope that helps explain. 

I see what you are saying now when it comes to nitrates.  I wonder how water changes affect phosphate levels......

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Farmboyreef
10 minutes ago, mr9iron said:

I see what you are saying now when it comes to nitrates.  I wonder how water changes affect phosphate levels......

Well, I expect the same. So a 50% water change should lower the number by 50% and so forth. But this isn’t by any means me saying water changes aren’t needed. They provide benefits other than nutrient removal. 

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mr9iron
Just now, Farmboyreef said:

Well, I expect the same. So a 50% water change should lower the number by 50% and so forth. But this isn’t by any means me saying water changes aren’t needed. They provide benefits other than nutrient removal. 

I got ya.  

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