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TatorTaco

Quick Question About Cycle - With Pretty Graphs

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Performing a fishless cycle with 100% dry rock + dry sand.  Used Dr. Tim's Ammonia and then Dr. Tim's One & Only. 

 

Can y'all take a quick looksie and give me your opinion on where I stand?  I've confused myself and tossed the One & Only bottle away.  I think I'm at the point now where I add ammonia to see if it disappears within 24-48 hours.  Or, I do a 50% water change and then I add more ammonia?

 

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TILTON   

I would have tried to have got the ammonia up around 4ppm.

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seabass   

The Process:  http://www.drtimsaquatics.com/resources/fishless-cycling

  1. Day 1 – dose ammonia to 2 ppm ammonia-nitrogen [NH3-N] using our ammonium chloride (1 drop per gallon [After Nov 2016 when using DrTim’s ammonium chloride use 4 drops per gallon]) [NOTE: do not expect your test kit to exactly read 2 ppm and it is not critical to get exactly 2 ppm. The key is to not add too much ammonia].  If using DrTim’s Aquatics One & Only Live Nitrifying bacteria add it now (turn skimmer, UV and ozone off and remove filter socks for 48 hours).
  2. Day 2 – Measure ammonia and nitrite.
  3. Day 3 – If ammonia and nitrite are below 1 ppm add more ammonia: four drops of our ammonium chloride per gallon (check the label).
  4. Days 4 & 5 – Measure ammonia and nitrite.
  5. Day 6 – If ammonia and nitrite are below 1 ppm add 2 ppm ammonia. Four drops of our ammonium chloride per gallon. [NOTE: since you have added the One & Only your ammonia kit will not read 2 ppm and DO NOT continue adding ammonia trying to get to 2 ppm – just add 2 ppm ammonia (4 drops per gallon of our ammonium chloride) and carry-on.
  6. Days 7 & 8 – Measure ammonia and nitrite. On the first measurement day (Day 2, 4, 5, 7 or 8) that BOTH ammonia and nitrite are both below 0.5 ppm (NH3-N or NO2-N) your tank is close to being cycled.
  7. Now start to measure ammonia and nitrite every day.
  8. When BOTH ammonia and nitrite are below 0.2 ppm (NH3-N or NO2-N), add another 2 ppm ammonia.
  9. Continue to measure every day. When you can add 2 ppm ammonia and BOTH ammonia and nitrite are below 0.2 ppm (NH3-N or NO2-N) the next day your tank is cycled – congrats! You’re done!
  10. Do a partial water change and add some fish.

 

I wouldn't worry about sticking to the days as outlined.  Basically just perform the steps listed and be patient.  No need to do a water change until the process is over (unless either ammonia or nitrite gets above 5 ppm).  Once completed, change enough water to bring nitrate below 10 ppm.  However, ammonia should be undetectable before adding livestock.

 

I'll also add, I wouldn't worry about nitrite unless it climbs above 5 ppm (as that may slow the process).  Nitrite is not very toxic at marine pH levels, so a little nitrite shouldn't be a problem.  It looks like you are on Step 3.

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9 hours ago, seabass said:

The Process:  http://www.drtimsaquatics.com/resources/fishless-cycling

  1. Day 1 – dose ammonia to 2 ppm ammonia-nitrogen [NH3-N] using our ammonium chloride (1 drop per gallon [After Nov 2016 when using DrTim’s ammonium chloride use 4 drops per gallon]) [NOTE: do not expect your test kit to exactly read 2 ppm and it is not critical to get exactly 2 ppm. The key is to not add too much ammonia].  If using DrTim’s Aquatics One & Only Live Nitrifying bacteria add it now (turn skimmer, UV and ozone off and remove filter socks for 48 hours).
  2. Day 2 – Measure ammonia and nitrite.
  3. Day 3 – If ammonia and nitrite are below 1 ppm add more ammonia: four drops of our ammonium chloride per gallon (check the label).
  4. Days 4 & 5 – Measure ammonia and nitrite.
  5. Day 6 – If ammonia and nitrite are below 1 ppm add 2 ppm ammonia. Four drops of our ammonium chloride per gallon. [NOTE: since you have added the One & Only your ammonia kit will not read 2 ppm and DO NOT continue adding ammonia trying to get to 2 ppm – just add 2 ppm ammonia (4 drops per gallon of our ammonium chloride) and carry-on.
  6. Days 7 & 8 – Measure ammonia and nitrite. On the first measurement day (Day 2, 4, 5, 7 or 8) that BOTH ammonia and nitrite are both below 0.5 ppm (NH3-N or NO2-N) your tank is close to being cycled.
  7. Now start to measure ammonia and nitrite every day.
  8. When BOTH ammonia and nitrite are below 0.2 ppm (NH3-N or NO2-N), add another 2 ppm ammonia.
  9. Continue to measure every day. When you can add 2 ppm ammonia and BOTH ammonia and nitrite are below 0.2 ppm (NH3-N or NO2-N) the next day your tank is cycled – congrats! You’re done!
  10. Do a partial water change and add some fish.

 

I wouldn't worry about sticking to the days as outlined.  Basically just perform the steps listed and be patient.  No need to do a water change until the process is over (unless either ammonia or nitrite gets above 5 ppm).  Once completed, change enough water to bring nitrate below 10 ppm.  However, ammonia should be undetectable before adding livestock.

 

I'll also add, I wouldn't worry about nitrite unless it climbs above 5 ppm (as that may slow the process).  Nitrite is not very toxic at marine pH levels, so a little nitrite shouldn't be a problem.  It looks like you are on Step 3.

You're my new hero.  Thank you so much @sea bass!

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@sea bass, would you mind taking a quick look at the provided graphs?  I seem to be stuck with 0 Ammonia, 1 Nitrite, and 50 Nitrate.  I'm aware that a water change will reduce my nitrates, but should I do it to also reduce my nitrites?  According to Dr. Tim's instructions, I don't think my nitrites were supposed to stay this high for this long. 

 

Could you offer your opinion on how I should proceed with the nitrigon cycle?

 

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seabass   

As long as nitrite is less than 5 ppm, I'd ignore it.  I would probably dose ammonia back up to 2 ppm one more time, then let it become undetectable again.  At that point, I'd do a huge water change (bringing nitrate below 10 ppm).

 

Nitrite isn't very toxic, so I wouldn't worry about it.  The water change to bring down nitrate, will also bring down nitrite, so no worries.  After the water change, it should be ready for some livestock.  However, add it slowly, giving the bacteria time to adjust to the new bio-loads.

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10 hours ago, seabass said:

As long as nitrite is less than 5 ppm, I'd ignore it.  I would probably dose ammonia back up to 2 ppm one more time, then let it become undetectable again.  At that point, I'd do a huge water change (bringing nitrate below 10 ppm).

 

Nitrite isn't very toxic, so I wouldn't worry about it.  The water change to bring down nitrate, will also bring down nitrite, so no worries.  After the water change, it should be ready for some livestock.  However, add it slowly, giving the bacteria time to adjust to the new bio-loads.

Than you for your advice.  I didn't want to make any erroneous assumptions about the cycle that would bite me in the butt later. 

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