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Haniya Rae

Beginner equipment advice for 10G bare bottom tank?

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Haniya Rae

Hello,

 

My name is Haniya, I live in Brooklyn, and I'm happy a community like this exists. I've really been enjoying all of the beginner posts on how to set up nano reef tanks. I have two freshwater tanks, a 20 gallon and a 40 gallon, and those are thriving. I want to get into reef building for two reasons, one from an environmental standpoint as I'm a journalist writing about sustainability issues and I'd like to know more about how reefs are affected (and feel like owning a small one would help me learn about the needs of reefs), and the other is that I'm looking for a challenge. I know that freshwater and saltwater are completely different, and making mistakes with my freshwater tanks, I know that it can be a very expensive hobby.

 

I haven't set up the tank yet, but I have bought most of the supplies. I figure before I set it up, perhaps someone could tell me if I should return something/invest in a different piece of equipment. In my design, I am looking to affix live rock together in a small 'Z' shape, and I've bought putty and superglue to make it happen. I also was thinking I'd start with SPS corals, sticking with a pink/purple-blue/orange color scheme, so any ideas on corals that fit that description that would also do well in a 10G would be appreciated! Eventually, I'd probably add about 10 Cerith snails as a cleanup crew, and maybe a small fish several months from now, but I'd rather get the tank as stable as possible before I do that. 

 

Here are my supplies so far:

Aquamaxx Cuboid tank

Seachem Labs 55 gal Tidal Filter 

  • on my freshwater tanks, I always err on the side of having the filter be a lot more powerful, but if this isn't the case with saltwater, please let me know!
  • the other question is if the skimmer on the tidal would intake needed nutrients, and if so, what's the best way to resupply them?

Sun Submersible Wave Maker

Kessil A80 Tuna Blue and the gooseneck clamp for it

Instant Ocean Salt 10 Gallon

  • Since the tank is .8 more gallons than this box, I'm assuming I need to purchase more salt?

Refractometer

Heater & thermometer & Reef testing kit 

Putty and superglue for the live rock

  • IC-Gel Insta Cure Cyanoacrylate Gel, specifically, putty is pool putty

Live rock from Bulk Reef Supply

  • 5 lbs of Tonga Shelf reef
  • 5 lbs of Rubble reef

100 mL - Instant Ocean BIO-Spira

  • don't know if I need this if the Bulk Reef Supply rock is cured dry live rock?

 

I wanted to make this tank without live sand as I like the look of that better. If that's not possible, though, I can definitely get some.

 

Thanks again in advance!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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HarryPotter

A 10g tank with sand and rock would overflow if you added 10g. You're probably fine. SPS corals are some of the most needy and not exactly beginner friendly, as youll to test and dose for at least Calcium and Alkalinity + maintain a very stable temperature and salinity. A bare bottom nano SPS tank is even more difficult, as it tends to teeter between excessive nutrients and starvation. Have you seen a successful bare bottom 10g SPS tank with hang on filtration? 

 

 

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Haniya Rae
8 minutes ago, HarryPotter said:

Have you seen a successful bare bottom 10g SPS tank with hang on filtration? 

 

 

The ones I've seen around the web say it's easier to clean/maintain? Is the HOB filtration a problem, you think?

 

 

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Clown79

The seachem tidal is a great filter. I have one and it's my favourite hob.

 

I wouldn't  use the sponge as your rocks are the biological filter and sponges in sw  are nutrient traps.

 

Buy filter floss in bulk and use that. Switch out twice a week.

 

Sps are not beginner corals. They need a mature and stable tank. Advised for 6mnths plus, preferably a yr old tank.

They are extremely sensitive to parameter swings. 

That means a lot of testing, dosing, and an understanding  of water chemistry.

 

During the first 7 months, there are tons of trial and error. Algae outbreaks etc. 

 

 

Lps  and soft corals are more appropriate for a new tank and a person new to reef keeping. 

 

You may not need all 10lbs of rock. You want some room in there.

 

As for sand. Many go bare Bottom but there is a significance to sand. The reason we use aragonite sand is for the carbonate buffering and oh balance.

 

Without fish in the tank first, there will be nothing providing nutrients to the corals. You will then need to feed them and find a balance on feeding them frequently without getting high nutrient levels.

 

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Haniya Rae
13 hours ago, Clown79 said:

The seachem tidal is a great filter. I have one and it's my favourite hob.

 

Buy filter floss in bulk and use that. Switch out twice a week.

 

Sps are not beginner corals. They need a mature and stable tank. Advised for 6mnths plus, preferably a yr old tank.

They are extremely sensitive to parameter swings. 

That means a lot of testing, dosing, and an understanding  of water chemistry.

 

Without fish in the tank first, there will be nothing providing nutrients to the corals. You will then need to feed them and find a balance on feeding them frequently without getting high nutrient levels.

 

Thanks for your response! Maybe I'll buy a book on the different coral types as it seems there's a lot of varied information online.

 

When you say without fish in the tank first, do you mean it's better to put fish in first before the coral?

 

I'm thinking I might also start with macro algae and build up from there. 

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Clown79

Corals need nutrients and food. Fish waste provides that.

 

if you don't have fish, you have to feed corals more often.

 

Most who have fish either feed their corals only 1-2 times a week or not at all because the fish provides waste which provides nutrients.

 

Without fish, nutrient levels are either low to none causing a decline in coral health.

 

You don't need to buy a book on corals. Theres tons of info online.

The vast majority of experienced hobbiests will not advise sps for a beginner, especially on a new tank.

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