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lonewonderer

Water changes

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lonewonderer

Hello everyone, I'm new to this forum and to this saltwater hobby. I have a 24g jbj nano cube with 1 blue damsel 4 turbo and 6 hermit crabs. It's been running for 2 weeks now and the Nitrites are high. I wanted to do water change on it to help lower the nitrites. I add seachem safe ever 24hrs. How much water change do you recommend for this 24 gallon tank? when I'm mixing salt , do i have to match the actual salinity in the tank or it needs to be within the range from the hydrometer? and does the PH matter every time i do WC? any recommendation on how to do it step by step? thank you guys!

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Superdave

I have never used Seachem Safe, but adding it every 24 hours seems like too much.  I cannot think of any product (other than food!) you would want to be adding that often.  

 

Water changes..

I would say 10% of your tank's volume, though some people do more.  It was always safer to do more frequent, small changes than large ones at any point.  Ideally you want the salinity of the new water being added to be what you want you tank to be.  If water has evaporated out, then the salinity will naturally have risen some.  I buy my saltwater premixed as my tank is small (5.5 gallon) and economically and in terms of convenience buying it is better for me.  I would mix the salt and water a few hours before you plan to use it--salt can take a while to fully dissolve.  Some people like to siphon sand/substrate and or "blast" the rocks with a turkey baster right before the water change, but that is up to you.  Making sure the temperature of new water is close to tank temp is important--temp variants can shock your livestock, causing them stress and or death.  

 

There are some good article on this site as well as others about water changes.  

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lonewonderer

Thank you, So I'll do 10% every week. Its only about 2 gallons of it weekly so its no pain. Will it kill the fish if the new water is 0.26 while the tank has 0.23 gravity?

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Superdave

That amount of change will not kill the fish.  Ideally, you should be "topping off" the tank with fresh water so the salinity is never changing by much.  

 

If you are anxious about the mixing, price pre-mixed water at your local fish store.  It will be done correctly (check with them to see what salinity they have) and will allow you to keep that variable under control.  I think I pay around $6-7 for a 5 gallons of pre-mixed salter water which lasts me 5 or more water changes.  

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lonewonderer

Cool, I'll ask them. thank you again

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Superdave

No problem.   I will also add when I was mixing my own water, I learned to always have more of both salty and fresh in the event I had to start over and or add/remove water to get the levels correct.  Once you do it a few times, you will get the hang of it.  

 

Here is an article from this sub-forum on water changes:  

 

Something else to keep in mind--while I (and many others) do not mind you asking questions like these, there will be folks who will give you a hard time about not reading more before posting.  

 

 

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lonewonderer

Thank you so much. 

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lkoechle
2 hours ago, Superdave said:

No problem.   I will also add when I was mixing my own water, I learned to always have more of both salty and fresh in the event I had to start over and or add/remove water to get the levels correct.  Once you do it a few times, you will get the hang of it.  

 

Here is an article from this sub-forum on water changes:  

 

Something else to keep in mind--while I (and many others) do not mind you asking questions like these, there will be folks who will give you a hard time about not reading more before posting.  

 

 

There is a search function and lots of stickies in the begginers forum as well under the "library" tab on the menu :)

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1891Bro
3 hours ago, lonewonderer said:

Thank you, So I'll do 10% every week. Its only about 2 gallons of it weekly so its no pain. Will it kill the fish if the new water is 0.26 while the tank has 0.23 gravity?

Oh so salty!

IMG_1679.GIF.557004f48ac008a6cd2b3281c45

im kidding, I know you meant .OH26 (.026). 

3 hours ago, Superdave said:

I have never used Seachem Safe, but adding it every 24 hours seems like too much.  I cannot think of any product (other than food!) you would want to be adding that often.  

 

Water changes..

I would say 10% of your tank's volume, though some people do more.  It was always safer to do more frequent, small changes than large ones at any point.  Ideally you want the salinity of the new water being added to be what you want you tank to be.  If water has evaporated out, then the salinity will naturally have risen some.  I buy my saltwater premixed as my tank is small (5.5 gallon) and economically and in terms of convenience buying it is better for me.  I would mix the salt and water a few hours before you plan to use it--salt can take a while to fully dissolve.  Some people like to siphon sand/substrate and or "blast" the rocks with a turkey baster right before the water change, but that is up to you.  Making sure the temperature of new water is close to tank temp is important--temp variants can shock your livestock, causing them stress and or death.  

 

There are some good article on this site as well as others about water changes.  

He's using the seachem safe cause he's doing a fish in cycle. Only wet for two weeks. 

Well that didn't work out. 

IMG_1679.GIF

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docshipwreck

I see your tank is super young and new I wouldn't do a water change until your tank is cycled. 

 

I have a 20 L and with insert rock and sand am in between 16/17 gallons actual volume. Ill typically either do a small ( 2 gal) or large ( 5g) changed depending on tests levels and when previous change was done. My work scehdule is a little weird if I need to push closer to 10 days Ill do a large change.

 

Ill bring water up to temp and mix day before. I would make sure your tank is proper salinIty before you change water. BUY A REFRACTOMETER AND CALIBRATION SOLUTION!!!

 

Salinity will rise as your water evaporates. I would strongly suggest investing in an auto top off.

 

Mix your new water to match old slowly siphon out...I use matching buckets so you can gauge equal volume 

 

 

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lonewonderer

Good call on that matching buckets. Love that idea.  So no water change until my nitrites hit 0ppm. gotcha! Thanks

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docshipwreck

Not sure how you're cycling but once your nitrates are through the roof  I'd do your first change until then. Just monitor to see if your tank is processing the ammonia.

 

Matching buckets allows you to change any volume and able to match it instead of trying to eye ball it 

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lonewonderer

W. Parameters are

 

Ammonia 0ppm

Nitrites 1ppm

Nitrates 10ppm

 

tank has been running since may 13 so yeas its pretty new.  

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1891Bro
25 minutes ago, docshipwreck said:

I see your tank is super young and new I wouldn't do a water change until your tank is cycled. 

 

I have a 20 L and with insert rock and sand am in between 16/17 gallons actual volume. Ill typically either do a small ( 2 gal) or large ( 5g) changed depending on tests levels and when previous change was done. My work scehdule is a little weird if I need to push closer to 10 days Ill do a large change.

 

Ill bring water up to temp and mix day before. I would make sure your tank is proper salinIty before you change water. BUY A REFRACTOMETER AND CALIBRATION SOLUTION!!!

 

Salinity will rise as your water evaporates. I would strongly suggest investing in an auto top off.

 

Mix your new water to match old slowly siphon out...I use matching buckets so you can gauge equal volume 

 

 

I'm on the other side of this coin. With the damsel in there you are doing a fish in cycle. You absolutely should do waterchanges during the cycle with a fish in there. 

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docshipwreck
2 minutes ago, 1891Bro said:

I'm on the other side of this coin. With the damsel in there you are doing a fish in cycle. You absolutely should do waterchanges during the cycle with a fish in there. 

I agree...wasn't sure of cycle if fish in, pre cured live rock or which ever 

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1891Bro
11 minutes ago, docshipwreck said:

Not sure how you're cycling but once your nitrates are through the roof  I'd do your first change until then. Just monitor to see if your tank is processing the ammonia.

 

Matching buckets allows you to change any volume and able to match it instead of trying to eye ball it 

First post in the thread. 

 

Im not hammering on you for doing a fish in cycle, I did my first tank with a damsel. Don't be surprised if someone tells you not to though. It will still get things going though, wheather anyone agrees or disagrees. But, DO WATER CHANGES WHILE CYCLING WITH A FISH. 

2 minutes ago, docshipwreck said:

I agree...wasn't sure of cycle if fish in, pre cured live rock or which ever 

You were too fast. 

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Clown79

During cycling waterchanges aren't performed.

 

Doing 10-20% weekly afterwards is common.

 

Blasting rocks with a new turkey baster, removing algae from glass, and then vacuuming sandbed is all beneficial practices.

 

Switching your filter floss 2 times a week, rinsing media bags, changing carbon every 3 weeks is important.

 

If you have an all in one, syphoning the chambers every other week is important.

 

When mixing salt, its absolutely necessary to match the salinity in your tank and having temp close to it as well.

 

Fluctuations in salinity is not something you want, so topping up daily evap with fresh water is important as well as mixing salt water to your sg.

Make a mark on the outside of the tank and the next day top up to that mark.

 

I agree, hydrometers are not very accurate. Refractometer and calibration fluid is an investment.

 

Each salt mix is different. Some require 24hr pre mix, some no more than 4 hrs, some ready in 30mins. Read the instructions as some salt precipitate when mixed for long periods like red sea coral pro.

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