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seabass

Clownfish eggs

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seabass   

The specific gravity is currently at 1.013 (a tad bit higher than the 1.012 which is typically noted at the high end range for hyposalinity).  I'm going to try to keep it around here until I get back from my upcoming trip.  Then I'll start the ParaGuard treatments as a precaution.

 

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Keeping that in mind, it is best for Seahorse keepers to make their target salinity 1.011-1.012 to allow a margin for error, and to transfer their ponies to a hospital tank while they drop the salinity in the main tank.  That way, no harm will be done if the hobbyist accidentally takes the salinity down too far in their main tank before readjusting it and hitting your target salinity. And when you return the seahorses from normal salinity in the hospital tank to the main tank at 1.011-1.012, the parasites will be subjected to the greatest possible osmotic shock, leaving them no chance at all to adjust to change in osmotic pressure.

 

The same precautions recommended for seahorses also apply to most species of clownfish (Amphiprion spp.).  Some Clownfish cannot tolerate freshwater dips, and these clowns should be treated in the same manner as Seahorses when administering hyposalinity to be safe.

source: http://wetwebmedia.com/ca/volume_4/V4I4/hyposalinity/OST.htm

 

 

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That is great news! Thanks for the update. Do you have someone to watch the tank for your trip?

 

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seabass   
1 minute ago, debbeach13 said:

Do you have someone to watch the tank for your trip?

Yeah, but I don't want them dosing Paraguard.  It'll be a short trip; however, since I don't want to start, stop, and restart ParaGuard treatments (which get dosed everyday), I'll wait until I get back.

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I didn't think a tank sitter would start dosing. It is good piece of mind to have someone checking on the equipment and livestock when you take a trip.

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seabass   

I  know, I was just conveying my plans.  I don't trust tank sitters to do much, basically just check on water levels.  I typically setup an auto-feeder, but I've also had tank sitters feed premeasured portions of dry food.

 

I'm hoping my clownfish start accepting flake again (since I won't make the sitter feed frozen).  If they are still just eating frozen mysis, they'll have to go without until I get back.  I'll still auto-feed flake for the angelfish and blenny (and clownfish if they decide they want any).

 

It was funny watching how aggressive the female went after the mysis.  The angelfish had been enjoying the competition free feedings.

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Pjanssen   

Yay! We were all so worried about our mama!

 

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Astinus   

I too am relieved to hear the she is eating well :)  Keep up ur great work :)

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Hey, Seabass. I don't care that your clown is eating.:D

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seabass   

:mellow:

 

 

 

 

 

 

:lol:

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Pjanssen   
3 hours ago, RayWhisperer said:

Hey, Seabass. I don't care that your clown is eating.:D

meanie!

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5 hours ago, Pjanssen said:

meanie!

Forever and always.

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seabass   

Update: Specific gravity is still 1.013 and the clownfish are both enthusiastically eating flakes now.  I have to take another trip soon so I haven't dosed ParaGuard yet.  However, there are still no visible signs of ich on the fish.  I guess I should figure out how long they've been in hyposalinity.

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That's great news that they're eating well again. More evidence towards their sensitivity to hyposalinty. This must be the home stretch for treatment?

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seabass   

It's been five weeks since starting the hyposalinity treatment, and about four weeks since the fish have been visibly clear of ich.  So the treatment should be done this week.  As a precaution, I had planned on dosing with ParaGuard the last three weeks of treatment; but instead, I'll dose ParaGuard as a raise the specific gravity (after my second trip, if it happens as planned).

 

The tank is overdue for a water change and fresh activated carbon.  I should have some time for the needed maintenance tomorrow.  However, I'll have to pull the carbon before I start the ParaGuard treatments.  I'm a little torn between skipping the ParaGuard in order to verify that the hyposalinity worked, and taking the extra precaution.  But as stated, I still plan on dosing ParaGuard.

 

Occasionally, the male clownfish will still clean the nesting rock.  I think he's hopeful.  However, I'm pretty sure this is going to set back any spawning events for awhile.  I'd still like to see if I can raise several baby clownfish, but it's been about three months since she's laid any eggs.  Well, one step at a time I guess.

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seabass   
On 4/5/2017 at 1:28 AM, seabass said:

I'm pretty sure this is going to set back any spawning events for awhile.

Or not. :unsure:

 

Yeah sorry, I didn't clean the tank yet.

 

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Astinus   

lmao! That Blenny!  Hamming it up!    Mugging for the Camera!

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seabass   
3 minutes ago, Astinus said:

lmao! That Blenny!  Hamming it up!    Mugging for the Camera!

Haha, yeah he's growing on me.  Besides making poo the size of a large food pellet, he's a pretty cool guy.

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Astinus   

Glad to see that ur Clowns are doing well and seem to be interested in the "Deed".

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seabass   

Today was the first I've seen her interested in nesting since I've lowered the specific gravity.  I'm not sure if they plan on spawning soon; normally (based on their behavior) I'd say yes.  Also, I'm not sure what the lower specific gravity would do to the development of the eggs.

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Astinus   
23 minutes ago, seabass said:

Today was the first I've seen her interested in nesting since I've lowered the specific gravity.  I'm not sure if they plan on spawning soon; normally (based on their behavior) I'd say yes.  Also, I'm not sure what the lower specific gravity would do to the development of the eggs.

THAT!! Is an excellent question!

Have u researched that question from the Books and or sources U have used for ur Clownfish attempt?

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seabass   

I remember reading this, which relates somewhat:

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The hobbyist should also bear in mind that hyposalinity can delay gonadal development in immature seahorses and, in some instances, may also prevent mature seahorses from breeding until the salinity is returned to normal. So don't maintain low salinity for the long term -- as soon as the 3-6 week treatment period is over, gradually bring the specific gravity in the main tank back up 1.024-1.025.

Source: http://wetwebmedia.com/ca/volume_4/V4I4/hyposalinity/OST.htm

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Astinus   

Hmm, Good stuff!

Should let VLangel (Dawn) know.  I do not know if she is aware of that.

I wonder if that would affect ur spawn.  Intriguing.

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LOL @ bleny photo bomb!

 

I came across this larval trap earlier today at BRS, would something like this be feasible to try to capture the hatchlings the next time they spawn? http://www.bulkreefsupply.com/larval-trap-vossen.html. Instead of trying to stay up all night, it seems this trap uses an air pump to move water through it.

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seabass   

Thanks Chris, I love the description of that trap " If you have ever tried collecting fish larvae in an aquarium it is a time consuming tedious task, that will usually require you to stay up late at night after the lights go out with minimal results".  That pretty much sums it up for me.  With a night light, that trap might just work.  I may have to try that out.

 

Joyce D. Wilkerson describes a trap in her Clownfishes book.  There's also a picture of it (which I can't copy and paste).

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Catching and gathering larval clownfish (or other tiny larvae) from a hatching tank can be made infinitely easier—on the targets and their keeper—with a simply constructed invention I call a Larval Snagger. The idea works because marine larvae are often phototrophic and will swarm around a light source if the surrounding area is dark. The snagger employs a nightlight or other low-wattage bulb to attract the larvae, which are then gently siphoned out of the tank and into an acrylic specimen box. There they remain, while water flows through a coffee filter screen (keeping the larvae in the box) and then back into the hatching tank via a small water pump...

Source: Wilkerson, Joyce D.. Clownfishes (Kindle Locations 4722-4728). Microcosm Ltd.. Kindle Edition.

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