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One Stop Guide for Your Shrimp!

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AFellowReefer’s Encyclopedia on Shrimp: The One Stop Guide for Your Shrimp!!

 

NOTE: This took me a long time to type up, so you all better like it! :)

 

Introduction: Hello all you fellow reefers! Decided to live up to my name and let you all learn about shrimp!!! I have always wanted to make an encyclopedia on shrimp, it has been my dream... (strange dream, I know.) I have compiled a list of common and not so common species of shrimp found in the hobby. I will give you information on tank conditions, personalities, reef safe, behavior, compatibility, and a whole lot of other stuff.

 

Minor Things that bother me on this Forum

-The plural of shrimp is shrimp, NOT shrimps, just thought everyone outta know :)

 

General Information about Shrimp

Shrimp are widespread and are quite abundant as they can be found near the seafloor, shallow coasts, estuaries, and even as deep as the Marianas Trench. They are classified as decapods, belonging to the class of Crustacea, along with crabs and lobsters. Shrimp are quite diverse. Some species form the base of the eco-system, while others are higher on the food chain or provide cleaning services to fish.

 

All shrimp have an exoskeleton and subsequently molt it every few weeks (the molting frequency depends upon the species and water conditions.) They require proper iodine and calcium levels in the tank in order to molt properly, as they use these trace elements to have their exoskeleton harden. Please do not dose your tank with iodine and calcium unless you are checking iodine parameters. If you dose too much, this can lead to excessive molting and eventual death. All shrimp require a stable specific gravity. A quick swing in salinity can easily kill your shrimp, so be sure as to when you add them, use drip acclimation and maintain appropriate salinity levels. Shrimp can tolerate a specific gravity of 1.021-1.022, however prefer a higher specific gravity of 1.023-1.025. Shrimp cannot tolerate copper.

 

Classification

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Arthropoda

Subphylum: Crustacea

Class: Malacostraca

Order: Decapoda

Family:

Genus:

Species:

 

Shrimp Anatomy

18M.gif

Here is a pretty good picture of the anatomy of a shrimp. Be aware, all shrimp have a different number of teeth on their rostrum, depending on the species and often differentiates many similar looking species. Here is the basic function of the major components on a shrimp-

Antenna and flagella- Its function is for “touch”, they will use it for sensory information

Eyes- Like insects, shrimp possess compound eyes

Pleopods- Also known as “swimmerets,” are used for swimming, and in females, they are used to hold, fan, and then disperse the eggs into the water column

Carapace- Provides protection and support, it is part of the exoskeleton

Maxillipeds (not diagramed)- Primary mouthparts

Mandibles (not diagramed)- Secondary mouthparts, contains a muscular jaw

 

For those of you who have too much time on your hands, here is an excellent resource on shrimp anatomy- http://www.chucksaddiction.com/shrimpanatomy.html

 

Breeding Your Shrimp and Raising Your Larvae

It is pretty easy to get your shrimp to reproduce. Many species are sequential hermaphrodites, such as the genus of Lysmata. However, many species are not hermaphroditic and sexing between the two can be difficult (I will tell you how to sex your shrimp in each profile below.) The shrimp will generally spawn once per month around dawn. They will release their eggs into the water column where the larvae will perish, unless moved to another tank. In nature, the larvae would become part of the zooplankton, until they matured.

 

Raising your larvae is difficult, and few have succeeded. You need a dedicated tank, with a sponge filter and pristine water conditions. The larvae are quite sensitive to sudden salinity swings, so constant monitoring of specific gravity is a must. Perhaps the most difficult part of raising the larvae is giving them proper food, The larvae require a constant supply of live foods, which can be difficult. In the early stages of development, the larvae require rotifers. As they mature they accept larger prey, such as baby brine shrimp. Be aware that the brine shrimp should be gut loaded to provide nutrition for your larvae. Larval development varies upon species, and also is dependent on the amount of food is provided for the larvae.

 

Compatibility Chart

CwNLlml.jpg

 

Key-

YG= Yes/Groups; they are compatible and should be kept in groups

Y= they are compatible

C= possibly compatible; with caution

MP= only compatible as a mated pair

MP-H= only compatible as a mated pair, however are hermaphroditic, and will pair up as long as there are only two specimens in a given tank

N= not compatible

 

Abbreviated Common Names-

CBS= Coral Banded Shrimp

Yellow L.= Yellow Line Shrimp

Venus A.= Venus Anemone Shrimp

SS Cleaner= Scarlet Skunk Cleaner Shrimp

 

NOTE:

-This chart applies to smaller tanks (like 20gal and under) as the larger the Tank gets, the more likely compatibility is, as there is more room and therefore less conflicts.

-I had to omit the word shrimp and abbreviate common names in order to fit all the all the names.

 

How this Thread is Organized: I organized this by alphabetical order using scientific name. That way, all species in the same genus will be in the same place. For those of you who do not know scientific names, do not worry, the common name is right next to the scientific name.

 

 

Alpheus Genus

The family Alpheidae (family of pistol shrimp) consists of at least 46 genera with more than 600 species. Most do not exceed 1 inch in length and often hitchhike on live rock. These shrimp are the most common shrimp found in coral reefs, however are often never seen as they live in their burrows for most of their life.

 

The Alpheus genus is characteristic of one large claw, properly called a dactylus that acts as a defense and for hunting prey. The dactylus has the capacity to close quickly, causing an air bubble to form and subsequently a sonic wave. It is considered to be one of the fastest things in the animal kingdom, occurring in about 300 microseconds. The dactylus is in fact so strong, that it produces a flash of light (not visible to the naked eye) along with a blast of heat. Researchers suggest the temperature inside these bubbles produced may reach up to 8,540 degrees Fahrenheit for less than a second. It has the same force as a .22 pistol and will instantly stun or kill their prey.

 

The Alpheus genus also forms many symbiotic relationships with other species on the reef, including echinoderms, sponges, corals, sea anemones, mollusks, and other crustaceans. For example, Alpheus lottini lives in Pocillopora corals and will protect their host from the crown-of-thorns sea stars, a deadly menace on the coral reef. Alpheus heterochaelis also form symbiotic relationships with Panopeus herbstii or black-clawed mud crab. Some pistol shrimp have even been known to live with mantis shrimp. However, the most known partnership occurs between at least 30 species in the genus Alpheus and about 130 different species of watchman gobies. The Alpheus genus’ unique symbiotic relationship between goby and shrimp has helped the species to become quite popular in the aquarium industry.

 

Pistol v. Mantis: Which hitchhiker do I have?

A common question among beginning aquarist is if they have a pistol shrimp or a mantis shrimp which has hitchhiked on their new live rock. Distinguishing the two is often quite difficult as the sounds are quite similar. However, there are some clues that help give away what you have. Most pistol shrimp are nocturnal and will use their dactylus as a warning against potential predators. So when a large fish gets too close to a rock, you should hear warning shots. Also, you should only hear the pistol at night.

 

Alpheus bellulus (Tiger Pistol Shrimp)

alpheus-bellulus.jpg

Other Common Names: Tiger Snapping Shrimp, Snapping Shrimp

Care Level: Easy

Aggressiveness: Moderately aggressive. This shrimp are known for being more aggressive compared to other species of the Alpheus genus due to its larger size. They will kill other, smaller species if not fed properly and have been responsible for disappearances in tanks, especially other shrimp species. I would recommend this species to pair with a larger species of goby, and not to house it with smaller or even similar sized shrimp.

Reef Compatible: Yes

Water Conditions: 75-82° F, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025

Maximum Size: 3”

Compatibility to other species: Do not house with fish that will hunt shrimp, such as groupers, anglers or lion fish. Also, I would not recommend any shrimp smaller than or similar size with the tiger pistol as the pistol shrimp may kill that shrimp. Also, do not keep small fish as they may fall victim to tiger pistols as well.

Origin: They are native to Eastern Asia

Potential Lifespan: 5+ years

Family: Alpheidae

 

The tiger pistol shrimp is known for their unique symbiotic relationship with watchman gobies, such as the yellow watchman goby as seen in this picture. The pair will become bonded and the tiger pistol will continuously dig a burrow for the pair to live in. In return, the goby will remain on the lookout for predators, providing protection for their near blind symbiotic partner. The pistol shrimp will usually have an antenna on the goby in order to know where the goby is. Please be aware that the shrimp/goby will not always partner up with each other, so for best results, introduce them at the same time, or purchase an already bonded pair. Also keep the sand bed at about 3-4 inches, as this will provide a deep enough burrow for you pistol shrimp to live.

 

Often times , this shrimp will remain in its burrow and will not be seen, generally, a smaller tank is preferred, no smaller than ten gallons as this will ensure that you will see the pair more often and will be able to witness a truly unique symbiotic relationship.

 

Attempted breeding is rare and limited success has been reported. Sexing any pistol shrimp is difficult as very little is known about gender, however generally the females have a broader abdomen and broader pleopods , while the males will have a larger dactyus as they will use it when fighting for a female. Here is the only attempt to breed them I have seen online- http://www.marinebreeder.org/forums/viewtopic.php?p=6536&sid=e7a6b88e30bfcf39bf6bf9ab61efedf7 It was an unknown species and the attempt to raise the zoea (larvae) failed sometime after the thirteenth day.

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Alpheus randalli (Randalli’s Pistol Shrimp)

1550865_f248.jpg

Other Common Names: Red Banded Snapping Shrimp, Candy Cane Pistol Shrimp

Care Level: Easy

Aggressiveness: Peaceful. Unlike its cousin, the tiger pistol shrimp, Randalli’s pistol shrimp rarely will hunt any tank inhabitants

Reef Compatible: Yes

Water Conditions: 75-82° F, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025

Maximum Size: 2”

Compatibility to other species: Do not house with fish that will hunt shrimp, such as groupers, anglers or lion fish

Origin: Throughout the Indo-Pacific

Potential Lifespan: 5+ years

Family: Alpheidae

 

They are generally paired with smaller gobies, as Randalli’s pistol shrimp will remain small and rarely get to two inches. I recommend however that you always go with a Randalli, as they are the most peaceful of all the pistol shrimp. This ensures that you will not lose any tank inhabitants as some tiger pistols may hunt their tank mates. Even a large goby will pair up with a small Randalli pistol.

 

Like the tiger, Randalli will spend most of their time digging as the watchman goby will look out for predators. The pair will share their food and live in the same burrow. Keep the sand bed to 3-4 inches so the pair has adequate room to live as they dig their burrow. A smaller tank is preferred as it will be easier to observe the symbiotic relationship. The tank should be no smaller than a 10 gallon aquarium. These shrimp are mostly nocturnal, and at night you may hear a “clicking” noise, which is the pistol shrimp using their dactyus.

 

Attempted breeding is rare and limited success has been reported. Sexing any pistol shrimp is difficult as very little is known about gender, however generally the females have a broader abdomen and broader pleopods , while the males will have a larger dactyus as they will use it when fighting for a female.

 


 


Alpheus sp. (Pistol Shrimp)

 

 

Caribbean_Pistol.jpg

Other Common Names: Caribbean Snapping Shrimp, Snapping Shrimp

Care Level: Easy

Aggressiveness: Varies

Reef Compatible: Yes

Water Conditions: 75-82° F, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025

Maximum Size: 2”-3”

Compatibility to other species: Do not house with fish that will hunt shrimp, such as groupers, anglers or lion fish. Also, just to be safe, I would not recommend any shrimp smaller than or similar size with these pistol shrimp as the pistol shrimp may kill other shrimp or small fishes. Being that this species is “assorted,” be weary of it and monitor the pistol until you are sure it is safe.

Origin: Caribbean

Potential Lifespan: Varies upon species

Family: Alpheidae

 

I felt it necessary to include this animal in my shrimp encyclopedia as a number of online retailers sell Alpheus sp. Be aware this is not an actual species, but an assortment of species (hence the “sp.”) that the online retailor will sell you. Always be cautious of a species you are not familiar with, as you do not know its aggressiveness towards its other tank mates. Also be aware that often times, while it may be a pistol shrimp, the pistol may NOT actually pair with your watchman goby as the pistol is not actually part of the Alpheus genus which pairs with gobies. All I can say is, “buyer beware.”

 


 


The Ancylomenes Genus

 

 

This genus belongs to the diverse family, Palaemonidae, where two subfamilies are distinguished: Palaemoninae and Pontoniinae. The Palaemoninae are carnivorous and are found in most marine habitats. The Pontoniinae inhabit coral reefs, and associate with certain invertebrates, notably for cnidarians, but also mollusks and echinoderms. This group includes cleaner shrimp and mostly feeds on detritus, however some are also carnivorous.

 

Members of the genus are widely distributed throughout the tropical oceans, and share a symbiotic relationship with anemones. Most members in this genus are cleaner shrimp that will come out of the anemones to clean the fish. This genus includes the popular Pederson cleaner shrimp.

 

Ancylomenes pedersoni (Pederson Cleaner Shrimp)

smulderpedersonclshr_400.JPG

Other Common Names: Pederson Anemone Shrimp

Care Level: Easy

Aggressiveness: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

Water Conditions: 75-82° F, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025

Maximum Size: 0.75”- 1”

Compatibility to other species: Do not house with fish that will hunt shrimp, such as groupers, anglers or lion fish. This is also a small shrimp, only getting to be a maximum of one inch, so be cautious when adding your Pederson, as many fish that will not typically hunt these shrimp, will eat them. It is best that these shrimp are the first creatures to be added, however if that is not possible, but them as close to the anemone as possible.

Origin: Caribbean

Potential Lifespan: 1+ years

Family: Palaemonidae

 

A tiny shrimp, this crustacean has received a lot of attention in the recent years. The Pederson has a mostly translucent body, with some purple, blue and white. They are very common in Bermuda, but can also be found in the Caribbean in general. They are a species of cleaner shrimp and will provide cleaning services they set up in the anemone in which they host. They will usually provide cleaning services and fish in the aquarium. They attract the passing fish by their waving of their antenna and prefer to be in groups.

 

These shrimp prefer to live in anemones and generally will not do well without one in a large aquarium. As these species are quite small, you should keep them in a small tank, something as small as a two gallon would be appropriate for these shrimp, and an anemone would no longer be required as the tank would be absent of any predators. Please note, if you decide to add these shrimp into a large tank that is absent of an anemone, the chances of you ever seeing the animal again is small as they will likely be consumed or will remain in the rock work and never come out, therefor it is recommended to add an anemone or put them in a small tank. When choosing an anemone, be aware they will host most species, but in nature they host Bartholomea annulata or Condylactis gigantean. When you add your Pederson, be aware this species will take several days to acclimate itself to the anemone by progressively pressing its body against the tentacles of the anemone. If separated from its host, they will have to acclimate themselves to that anemone once again. Also, be aware that if you own clownfish, they will not tolerate shrimp in their anemone and promptly kick the shrimp out. So do not add this shrimp if you have or are planning to have clownfish.

 

Something that is interesting is that if a neon goby sets up a cleaning station nearby, the shrimp and goby will both peacefully clean the fish together at the same time. I have never attempted this in captivity, so I am not sure if it can be accomplished in the aquarium, however it does not hurt to try. Researchers have also found that fish recognize Bartholomea annulata as being a place where the shrimp’s services are likely to be available and the larger the sea anemone, the more likely fish are to visit it.

 

Feeding your shrimp is not difficult, as they will eat various foods their host left behind. They will also often forage for fallen foods around their anemone, and eat the parasites they took off of the fish. You can also spot feed them pellets, flakes and meaty foods.

 


 


Ancylomenes venustus (Venus Anemone Shrimp)

 

 

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Other Common Names:

Care Level: Easy

Aggressiveness: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

Water Conditions: 75-82° F, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025

Maximum Size: 1.25”

Compatibility to other species: Do not house with fish that will hunt shrimp, such as groupers, anglers or lion fish. This is also a small shrimp, only getting only a little over an inch, so be cautious, as many fish that will not typically hunt these shrimp, will eat them. It is best that these shrimp are the first creatures to be added, however if that is not possible, but them as close to their symbiotic anemone as possible.

Origin: Indonesia

Potential Lifespan: 1+ years

Family: Palaemonidae

 

A fairly uncommon species to be found, they require the same care as Pedersons. The Venus Anemone Shrimp will also provide cleaning stations for fish and have a symbiotic relationship with anemones. They will host some species of anemones and hard corals.

 

These shrimp prefer to live in their host and generally will not do well without one in a large aquarium. As these species are quite small, you should keep them in a small tank, something as small as a two gallon would be appropriate for these shrimp. Please note, if you decide to add these shrimp into a large tank that is absent of a host, the chances of you ever seeing the animal again is small as they will likely be consumed or will remain in the rock work and never come out, therefor it is recommended to add an anemone/coral or put them in a small tank. When you add your Venus anemone shrimp, be aware this species will take several days to acclimate itself to the anemone by progressively pressing its body against the tentacles of the anemone. If separated from its host, they will have to acclimate themselves to that anemone once again. Also, be aware that if you own clownfish, they will not tolerate shrimp in their anemone and promptly kick the shrimp. So do not add this shrimp if you have or are planning to have a clownfish

 

Feeding your shrimp is not difficult, as they will eat various foods their host left behind. They will also will often forage for fallen foods around their anemone, and eat the parasites they took off of the fish. You can also spot feed them pellets, flakes and meaty foods.

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The Gnathophyllum Genus

Belonging to the family, Gnathophyllidae, this genus is known for its peculiar look and small size.

 

Gnathophyllum americanum (Bumble Bee Shrimp)

Bumble_Bee_Shrimp_ps.jpg

Other Common Names: Striped Harlequin Shrimp

Care Level: Easy

Aggressiveness: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

Water Conditions: 75-82° F, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025

Maximum Size: 1”

Compatibility to other species: Do not house with fish that will hunt shrimp, such as groupers, anglers or lion fish. This is also a small shrimp, only getting an inch, so be cautious, as many fish that will not typically hunt these shrimp, will eat them. DO NOT add them with starfish as this is the bumblebee’s preferred diet.

Origin: Throughout the Indo-Pacific

Potential Lifespan: 1+ years

Family: Gnathophyllidae

 

Not a normal looking shrimp in the traditional sense, this crustacean remains a very small size. The bumble bee shrimp get their name from the yellow/black pattern that resembles a bumble bee. These shrimp prefer to live in pairs, but can live alone. I would recommend a smaller aquarium so you can see these shrimp more as they are extremely tiny.

 

When feeding your bumble bee, feed them a variety of meaty foods and shrimp pellets. I find that many people do not realize that bumblebees will eat the tubed feet of starfish, only to find their beloved linkia starfish killed the next day. Do not add bumblebees to a tank with starfish, unless you are trying to rid your tank of nuisance asterina stars.

 

Reviews-

From Spazizz

I had a couple of bumblebee shrimp for few months. I switched to feeding them every other day and a week into it I found one dead and the other one missing. I think these shrimp need to be fed every day. Mine only ate frozen(mysis and brine) and were terrible at "hunting." They also didn't eat any asterina stars, they were very healthy and active shrimp when I fed them frozen every day.

 


 


The Hymenocera Genus

 

 

Hymenocera genus, is found throughout coral reefs in the tropical Indian and Pacific oceans. It is a rather exclusive group, only belonging to two species, H. picta and H. elegans, which are both commonly referred to as the harlequin shrimp. This genus helps to control the dreaded crown-of-thorns starfish which has been partly responsible for the destruction of some coral reefs.

 

H. picta v. H. elegan: What’s the Difference?

Hymenocera picta and Hymenocera elegans have been hotly debated on whether they are the same species, or they are different species. In the end, they differ only where they are located and their color scheme. H.picta originates from Hawai’i while H.elegans is native throughout the Indo-Pacific. Also, H.picta tends to have a lot more purple-orange than H.elegans. However, behavior and feeding remains the same between the two. H. elegans is much more readily available as well and will rarely ever see their Hawaiian counterpart sold in your average LFS. In fact, some marine biologists believe that the two species are the same having migrated to or from the Indo-Pacific.

 

Hymenocera elegans (Harlequin Shrimp)

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Other Common Names:

Care Level: Moderate

Aggressiveness: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

Water Conditions: 75-82° F, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025

Maximum Size: 2”-3”

Compatibility to other species: Do not house with fish that will hunt shrimp, such as groupers, anglers or lion fish.

Origin: Indian Ocean, and western Pacific Ocean

Potential Lifespan: 3+ years

Family: Gnathophyllidae

 

Indisputably the most beautiful shrimp found in the hobby, the Harlequin shrimp is magnificent creature to add in any marine aquarium. They have large claws, known as chelipeds, which are used for display. They prefer to live in mated pairs and are sometimes reclusive. Do not house Harlequins of the same sex together as they will often fight with each other. They will also stay in one particular cove when they become established in you aquarium and will return to their cave each day. They are pretty methodical and low key, unlike the hyper and agile scarlet skunk cleaner shrimp.

 

There is a catch to this shrimp however, they EXCLUSIVELY eat the starfish’s tube feet. This forces the aquarist to either continually replenish the supply of starfish or the better method (which is more cost effective and much more humane) you feed the Harlequins starfish arms. Essentially you buy multiple starfish (usually chocolate chip starfish as they are inexpensive) and cut an arm off once a week to feed your Harlequins. Do not be alarmed though, as the starfish will regrow its arm within a few weeks. You do this about once a week and rotate among the different individual starfish. People use Harlequins to rid their tanks of asterina stars, however I do not recommend this as the tank will not be able to support your Harlequins long term as they will consume the asterinas in mere weeks.

 

Like with all shrimp, breeding is difficult and raising the larvae to adulthood is limited at best. Sexing a male from a female is fairly easy as males are smaller and if you look at the underside of their abdomen, you will notice that it is all white. Females are colored, having blue spots (look at pictures below.) I recommend buying two similar sized shrimps or an already mated pair as the larger female may kill the smaller male. Breeding takes place after they have molted, so their breeding rate is restricted to how fast they molt, which is generally once a month. Here is an excellent resource for caring and breeding your Harlequins- http://www.chucksaddiction.com/harlequinshrimp.html

 

femaleharlequin_zps0c1dbd42.jpgmaleharlequin_zps344624ab.jpg

Sexing a male from a female is fairly easy as males are smaller and if you look at the underside of their abdomen, you will notice that it is all white. Females are colored, having blue spots.

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The Lysmata Genus

This genus offers some of the most popular shrimp in the hobby, including the beautiful fire shrimp, and the famous scarlet skunk cleaner shrimp. Lysmata are all hermaphroditic and are all considered cleaner shrimp; however some will clean more than others. The members of this genus provide an invaluable service in a coral reef ecosystem as they will rid fish of parasites. This genus belongs to the family Hippolytidae, which consists of 36 genera, including Lysmata, Thor, and Lebbeus . Hippolytidae includes cleaner shrimp and anemone shrimp.

 

Lysmata amboinensis (Scarlet Skunk Cleaner Shrimp)

tumblr_lpxu2pFAtz1qfudg0o1_500.jpg

Other Common Names: Indo-Pacific White-Banded Cleaner Shrimp, Cleaner Shrimp

Care Level: Easy

Aggressiveness: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

Water Conditions: 75-82° F, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025

Maximum Size: 3”

Compatibility to other species: Do not house with fish that will hunt shrimp, such as groupers, anglers or lion fish.

Origin: Throughout the Indo-Pacific

Potential Lifespan: 3+ years

Family: Hippolytidae

 

My all-time favorite shrimp! This species is probably the most popular shrimp in the hobby. The scarlet skunk cleaner shrimp will often become the star of the tank as they have a lot of personality. These shrimp are generally not afraid of humans, unlike many shrimp species. Scarlet skunk cleaner shrimp are also rarely solitary and are quite active during the day. Often times, when they see their owner, they will quickly come out from where they were in anticipation of food. This species is widespread throughout the Indo-Pacific, and especially the Red Sea. In the wild the scarlet skunk cleaner shrimp will set up cleaning stations with others of their own species. Passing fish will stop by to get cleaned as the shrimp scrutinizes the fish for parasites and decaying organic matter. This symbiosis can easily be replicated in the aquarium. In fact, often times the scarlet skunk cleaner will come to your hand to clean it, which is pretty amazing. These shrimp will prefer to be in groups as it will help simulate a more natural behavior of these shrimp, however living in groups is not required.

 

Scarlet skunk cleaner shrimp are generally reef safe. They have been known to eat a polyp, however this is not too common. This species however will steal food from other organisms, especially corals. When feeding your coral, it is best to keep the cleaner shrimp away. You can usually do this by distracting them by putting your hand in the tank (their natural instinct kicks in and will clean your hand) or you can spot feed them while you are feeding your coral. Both methods work, however, I find the “hand method” works best. Also, these shrimp will scavenge for food, but you should also feed them pellets and meaty foods. My cleaners have learned to come to the top of the tank when I give my fish flake foods.

 

As these shrimp are hermaphrodites, getting them to breed is easy, however raising the larvae is quite challenging and success is quite rare. They will lay up to 500 eggs in one spawning and will appear on the female’s pleopods and are greenish in color. The eggs tend to swell and lighten in color before hatching and the larvae tend to hatch and dispersed at around dusk. Larval development will generally take approximately six months where they will then molt every three to eight weeks. These shrimp are protandric, or they start out as a male, but after a few molts will become a hermaphrodite.

 

As a side note, for those of you attempting a biotope… While Lysmata amboinensis lives throughout the Indo-Pacific, it has a similar cousin in the Caribbean! The species is Lysmata grabhami. The only difference is that they have different patterns on their telson and uropod. L. amboinensis has four dots on their uropods and a horizontal red stripe through their telson. L. grabhami has two lateral curves on their uropods and one lateral stripe through their telson. L. grabhami requires the same care as L. amboinensis.

Bezkr_lysmata_amboinensis_grabhami_difference.JPG

 

What makes these shrimp two different species is that L. amboinensis has four dots on their uropods and a horizontal red stripe through their telson. L. grabhami has two lateral curves on their uropods and one lateral stripe through their telson.

 

Lysmata debelius (Fire Shrimp)

fireshrimp.jpg

Other Common Names: Blood Red Fire Shrimp

Care Level: Easy

Aggressiveness: Usually peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

Water Conditions: 75-82° F, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025

Maximum Size: 3”

Compatibility to other species: Do not house with fish that will hunt shrimp, such as groupers, anglers or lion fish. Also, this species is known for being aggressive toward their own kind, so it is recommended to have only one, or a pair, in a small set up.

Origin: Indonesia and Sri Lanka

Potential Lifespan: 3+ years

Family: Hippolytidae

 

One of the most beautiful shrimp you can find in the hobby, the fire shrimp is a bright red color, with white legs and white dots. In fact, depending on which region of the Indo-Pacific where the shrimp came from, they may have the white dots just on their carapace, or covering their entire body, (which is a divergent group found in Ari Atoll, this species is L. splendida.)

 

The fire shrimp is much more reclusive than the scarlet skunk cleaner shrimp. They prefer to hide in caves and will only come out at night. They will however come out when you are feeding the tank, but then will usually return to their cave. Just like the scarlet skunk cleaner shrimp, this species will also set up cleaning stations. However it has been my experience that these shrimp are much less likely to clean your fish during the day, but rather at night. These shrimp are mostly scavengers, eating any food that gets by the fish. You can also feed this shrimp pellets and meaty foods. Breeding is not difficult, but again, larval survival is extremely low and is almost never accomplished. Fire shrimp are hermaphrodites.

 

Lysmata wurdemanni (Peppermint Shrimp)

Peppermint_Shrimp_ps.jpg

Other Common Names:

Care Level: Easy

Aggressiveness: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

Water Conditions: 75-82° F, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025

Maximum Size: 2”

Compatibility to other species: Do not house with fish that will hunt shrimp, such as groupers, anglers or lion fish.

Origin: Caribbean

Potential Lifespan: 2+ years

Family: Hippolytidae

 

This shrimp is unique in my encyclopedia in that they are not considered ornamental shrimp, like all the others that are listed. Instead, they are highly valued for their quick work of the dreaded Aiptasia. This belief in that they eat Aiptasia can be misleading though as it really comes down to the individual. Some reports claim that only 25% of individuals will eat Aiptasia, while others claim approx. 75% will eat Aiptasia. It has been my experience that the 75% is a much more accurate statistic and support that one’s findings, however others can relate more to the 25% statistic. There has been no real scientific test on it, so these unofficial statistics are the best we have to work with and opinions will continue. In the end though, I would say when dealing with Aiptasia, you should put at least four to five shrimp as this ensures that at least one individual will eat Aiptasia. Also in my experience, peppermint shrimp tend to eat Aiptasia no larger than .75 inches. Supplemental feeding is not necessary as these shrimp will scavenge for uneaten food, however you can feed them pellets and meaty foods if you wish to spot feed them. These animals are nocturnal, they prefer groups and will usually all live under the same cave together. While they are part of the Lysmata genus, I find that this species will rarely, if ever clean your fish.

 

Like all shrimp, peppermint shrimp larvae are quite difficult to take care of. Peppermint shrimp are protandric simultaneous hermaphrodites, like all shrimp of the Lysmata genus. This means that the peppermint shrimp will start off as male, and after molting several times (four times if you must know) will then become hermaphroditic. Peppermint shrimp are constantly searching for receptive females. If you care about peppermint shrimp courtship, then here it goes- males use what are known as olfactory organs on their antenna to detect a female’s sex pheromones in the water. These pheromones are released 2-8 hours prior to female molting. As the male is guided by these chemical signals, they will make their way to the female and mate with her (assuming the male believes that the female is a suitable mate.) This always occurs after molting as the female’s exoskeleton is still soft.

 

Confusion: The Real Reason People think Peppermint Shrimp are “bad”

This is a common story; aquarist buys peppermint shrimp, peppermint shrimp added to tank, peppermint shrimp eats coral or dies within a few weeks. Common story, right? This is due to miscommunication of the common name. While MANY species look similar to peppermints, they are NOT peppermints. The most common imposters are the camel shrimp (Rhynchocinetes durbanensis & Rhynchocinetes uritai,) and the Catalina peppermint shrimp (Lysmata californica.) While camel shrimp will take care of your Aiptasia problem, they will also eat corals and are consequently not reef safe. Like the Catalina goby, the Catalina peppermint shrimp is a temperate species. They are unable to survive in warm temperatures for long periods of time and quickly die as a result. Therefore, please make sure that the species is Lysmata wurdemanni, and not the other three.

 

lysmata-californica-red-rock-shrimp-pict

While similar in appearance, L. californica is much more orange in color and lacks the same stripes as L. wurdemanni. L. californica require cooler waters as they are a temperate species.

 

 

The Microprosthema Genus

The Microprosthema genus is a unique one as they will host flame scallops.

 

Microprosthema semilaeve (Lima Shrimp)

256480245_07fc51631a.jpg

Other Common Names: Lima Boxer Shrimp

Care Level: Difficult

Aggressiveness: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

Water Conditions: 75-82° F, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025

Maximum Size: .5”

Compatibility to other species: Do not house with fish that will hunt shrimp, such as groupers, anglers or lion fish. This is also a small shrimp, only getting a half an inch, so be cautious, as virtually every fish will eat these shrimp.

Origin: Caribbean

Potential Lifespan: 1+ years

Family: Spongicolidae

 

Looking like this crustacean came straight from Hell, this animal is very costly and extremely small. Very little is known about this shrimp. The animals itself is not difficult to care for, however they live in the mantle of flame scallops, which have always been regarded as challenging to take care of. When getting Lima shrimp, be aware they prefer groups as the male will have a harem within the mantle of the flame scallop. Their requirement to live in flame scallops and extremely small size has prevented this shrimp from becoming popular in the hobby.

 

 

 

The Periclimenes Genus

This is a very large genus which belongs to the family, Palaemonidae, like the Pederson cleaner shrimp. This genus contains many shrimp which have formed a symbiotic relationship with sea cucumbers, anemones, and corals.

 

Periclimenes brevicarpalis (White Spot Anemone Shrimp)

periclimenes-brevicarpalis.jpg

Other Common Names: The Glass Anemone Shrimp, Pacific Clown Anemone Shrimp

Care Level: Easy

Aggressiveness: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

Water Conditions: 75-82° F, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025

Maximum Size: 2"

Compatibility to other species: Do not house with fish that will hunt shrimp, such as groupers, anglers or lion fish.

Origin: Throughout the Indo-Pacific

Potential Lifespan: 2+ years

Family: Palaemonidae

 

The body of this shrimp is quite transparent, with only spots of white though out the shrimp’s body. This species have been known to host corals, anemones, and even jellyfish. This shrimp will do best when they have a host. They will rarely stray away from the anemone or coral and will share their food with their host. Like the Pederson shrimp, the white spot anemone shrimp have to acclimate themselves when they are given a new anemone host. They will progressively rub themselves against the anemones tentacles for increasing amount of time. They will repeat this process every time they molt. Also, clownfish will kick these shrimp out if they want to host the same anemone the shrimp is hosting, so do not add clown if you want to have this species.

 

Sexing them can be difficult; however males are larger and have more spots than the females. These shrimp will prefer groups, however this is not required.

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Periclimenes soror (Sea Star Shrimp)

jw1367-camouflage_shrimp_brandon_cole.jp

Other Common Names:

Care Level: Moderate

Aggressiveness: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

Water Conditions: 75-82° F, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025

Maximum Size: 0.6”

Compatibility to other species: Do not house with fish that will hunt shrimp, such as groupers, anglers or lion fish. This shrimp is very tiny, and will turn most fish that would generally not eat shrimp, eat shrimp.

Origin: Indo-Pacific, Gulf of Panama

Potential Lifespan: 1+ years

Family: Palaemonidae

 

This is unique species of shrimp that is very rare in the hobby. In fact, I have never seen this species sold anywhere. So I would have to assume that the best chance of getting one is through one hitchhiking on a starfish. As their name implies, sea star shrimp have a symbiotic relationship with starfishes, as they will live on them. The shrimp’s color varies dramatically as the shrimp’s color depends on the host starfish. Sea star shrimp can be found on the coral reef and lagoons. Feeding is not well known, however it is thought that this species eats leftover detritus from their host and may also eat parasites on their host. Sea star shrimp will live in groups among the starfish and have been known to attempt to defend their host from potential predators.

 

 

 

The Rhynchocinetes Genus

Rhynchocinetes contains 14 species, only two of which are commonly available in the hobby. This genus contains two species very common to the hobby, Rhynchocinetes durbanensis and Rhynchocinetes uritai. There is only a slight difference between the two as R. uritai has 7-8 teeth on their rostrum and coloration is somewhat duller, while R. dubanensis has 9-10 teeth on their rostrum (see shrimp anatomy for rostrum and teeth.)

 

This genus belongs to the family, Rhynchocinetidae, which only contains only two genera, Cinetorhynchus and Rhynchocinetes, they are mostly reclusive and typically have an upward-hinged foldable rostrum, which is why the family is called what it is, Rhynchocinetidae, which means “movable beak.”

 

Rhynchocinetes durbanensis (Camel Shrimp)

Rhynchocinetes_durbanensis.jpg

Other Common Names: Hinge-beak Shrimp, Dancing Shrimp, or Camel Hump Shrimp

Care Level: Easy

Aggressiveness: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: No

Water Conditions: 75-82° F, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025

Maximum Size: 2”

Compatibility to other species: Do not house with fish that will hunt shrimp, such as groupers, anglers or lion fish.

Origin: Indo-Pacific

Potential Lifespan: 3+ years

Family: Rhynchocinetidae

 

This species will prefer to live in groups, with a minimum of three as they will all come out and forage together. The group will also make them feel secure. They will also congregate in the same rock crevices together during the day as they are mostly nocturnal. I find these shrimp quite interesting as this behavior is quite unique and not often found among shrimp, particularly in the hobby, unfortunately, these shrimp are NOT reef safe and will not hesitate to pick at and eat soft corals, especially zoanthids. This behavior may be kept at bay if you provide feeding each day for them by giving them shrimp pellets or meaty foods. However, this may not always work. Supplemental feeding is not necessary as they will scavenge for food, however you can feed them additional foods such as shrimp pellets and meaty foods.

 

This species is sexually dimorphic, meaning you can tell the difference between the two genders. Males will have a larger first pair of chelipeds. Females will carry up to 1,700 eggs and will spawn about every nine days.

 

 

 

The Saron Genus

This genus belongs to the family, Hippolytidae, like the Lysmata genus.

 

Saron marmoratus (Saron Shrimp)

Saron%20Shrimp.jpg

Other Common Names: Common Marble Shrimp, Monkey Shrimp

Care Level: Easy

Aggressiveness: I would say semi-aggressive, especially with others of the same species (especially if they are all males) as they will fight to the death

Reef Compatible: Usually, but may consume corals

Water Conditions: 75-82° F, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025

Maximum Size: 2”

Compatibility to other species: Do not house with fish that will hunt shrimp, such as groupers, anglers or lion fish.

Origin: Indo-Paific

Potential Lifespan: 2+ years

Family: Hippolytidae

 

The saron shrimp is a very interesting crustacean and has slipped through the radar of most aquarists.. During the day, they shrimp will be a brown with green spots and white speckles. The saron shrimp is nocturnal, and at night, the color of their body will change to red to aid them in camouflage.

 

Many argue that this shrimp is not reef safe and that they eat fish, while others say they are reef safe. Still some say they are ugly, and others say they are a very attractive species. These people can't all be right... well they are. The aquarium trade offers a huge variety of Saron shrimp, the most common two are Saron inermis and S. marmoratus. Consequently, people buy saron shrimp and the shrimp eats coral/attacks fish, while others will not.

 

This shrimp can be reclusive, however after they have acclimated to the tank, they will become more diurnal. This species lives in among rock rubble, as well as in lagoons and bay areas, so providing a rocky area for your saron shrimp is preferred. Saron shrimp are mostly scavengers, however you can provide additional food, such as pellets, frozen foods and other meaty foods. The saron shrimp is sexually dimorphic and the males have cirri (feathery looking things you see in the picture) all over their body.

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The Stenopus Genus

This genus includes the members of the coral banded shrimp, or boxing shrimp. It contains eleven species, and is part of the family of Stenopodidea.

 

Stenopus hispidus (Banded Coral Shrimp)

banded-coral-shrimp.png

Other Common Names: Boxing Shrimp

Care Level: Easy

Aggressiveness: Aggressive

Reef Compatible: Yes

Water Conditions: 75-82° F, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025

Maximum Size: 3”

Compatibility to other species: Do not house with fish that will hunt shrimp, such as groupers, anglers or lion fish. Do not put these crustaceans with other shrimp, or small or slow moving fish as they may be killed or injured.

Origin: Throughout the tropical waters, including the Caribbean and Indo-Pacific

Potential Lifespan: 3+ years

Family: Stenopodidea

 

This is by far my least favorite shrimp offered in the hobby. The coral banded shrimp is a mean animal. They will kill any shrimp that infringes in their territory. They will also kill and eat small fish. I hear many stories of this shrimp killing a goby and eating it. They have been also known for injuring slower moving fish. Therefore I do not recommend the coral banded unless you set up a species specific tank. Ten gallons is of adequate size.

 

This shrimp really travels around, as they are found in almost every coral reef ecosystem. They are solitary creatures and should not be housed with members of their own species unless it is a mated pair. They are mostly nocturnal and during the day will remain in a rock crevice. Be wary if you have small fish or shrimp housed with the coral banded at night, as this is when most of the killing occurs.

 

The coral banded shrimp may sometimes pick at zoanthids, however this is uncommon. In nature, the coral banded will act as a cleaner shrimp and clean the fish, they should clean your fish as well, however this is not always the case. Feeding the shrimp is not difficult as they will scavenge for food and rid many pests. They will also eat bristle worms. The male is usually smaller than the female.

 

Stenopus tenuirostris (Blue Coral Banded Shrimp)

blueBandedCoralShrimp1.jpg

Other Common Names: Blue Boxer Shrimp

Care Level: Easy

Aggressiveness: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

Water Conditions: 75-82° F, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025

Maximum Size: 1.5”

Compatibility to other species: Do not house with fish that will hunt shrimp, such as groupers, anglers or lion fish.

Origin: Indo-Pacific

Potential Lifespan: 3+ years

Family: Stenopodidea

 

This is a much better alternative to Stenopus hispidus as the blue coral banded is much smaller and therefore much more peaceful and less prone to attack. It is actually curious why this species is not as popular as S. hispidus. This shrimp is nocturnal, and will remain reclusive during the day. They will also act as a cleaner shrimp, ridding you fish of parasites. Additionally, the blue coral banded is an attractive part of your cleanup crew as they will help eradicate pests in you tank. Do not keep this species with other of their own kind as fighting will follow. You may have them in mated pairs. This shrimp can be put with other peaceful shrimp, however be cautious when placing this shrimp with a smaller species of shrimp, as the smaller species may be killed. This shrimp will scavenge for food, you may also supplement their feeding with shrimp pellets and meaty foods, such as raw shrimp or fish.

 

Stenopus zanzibaricus (Gold Coral Banded Shrimp)

stenopus-zanzibaricus.jpg

Other Common Names: Gold Boxer Shrimp

Care Level: Easy

Aggressiveness: Aggressive

Reef Compatible: Yes

Water Conditions: 75-82° F, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025

Maximum Size: 3”

Compatibility to other species: Do not house with fish that will hunt shrimp, such as groupers, anglers or lion fish. This species will not tolerate others of its own kind, other shrimp, and will kill small and methodical fish

Origin: Caribbean and Indo-Pacific

Potential Lifespan: 3+ years

Family: Stenopodidea

 

Much like their cousin, Stenopus hispidus, these shrimp are very aggressive. They will often kill small fish and will kill shrimp. They are very territorial and will not tolerate members of their own species unless it is a mated pair. I do not recommend these shrimp for any set up except for a species specific tank, or you know you will ONLY have large fish (that will not eat them) and clen up crew (absent of any other shrimp of course.) However, be aware they may injure your larger fish as well. When young, these shrimp will provide a cleaning service for your fish, but as they get older, they become more aggressive and are less likely to clean your fish. They will also rid you tank of many pests, and are known for eradicating bristle worm populations in very short order.

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The Thor Genus

Thor is a genus which contains twelve species of small, anemone shrimp. Only one is available in the aquarium trade.

 

Thor amboinensis (Sexy Shrimp)

Sexy_Shrimp_ps.jpg

Other Common Names: Dancing Shrimp, Hula Shrimp

Care Level: Easy

Aggressiveness: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

Water Conditions: 75-82° F, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025

Maximum Size: 1.5”

Compatibility to other species: Do not house with fish that will hunt shrimp, such as groupers, anglers or lion fish. This is also a small shrimp, only getting slightly over an inch, so be cautious, as many fish that will not typically hunt these shrimp, will eat them.

Origin: Caribbean, Indo-Pacific

Potential Lifespan: 3+ years

Family: Hippolytidae

 

Sexy shrimp are among the most popular shrimp in the aquarium hobby, and would be my second favorite shrimp. They remain a very small size and should not be housed in a large setup as they will easily be picked off by predators or they will remain hidden in the rock work and they will become lost. When adding them to your aquarium, you should introduce them as close to your rock work or desired host to avoid predation. You should keep them in a setup fifteen gallons or smaller. And smaller would be preferable.

 

Sexy shrimp get their name by their provocative way they walk as they will sway their abdomens back and forth. In nature, these shrimp will host anemones. Specifically Stichodactyla gigante, Condylactis gigantea, and Lebrunia danae. And in the aquarium, they will host sea anemones, as well as many corals such as mushroom coral, Ricordea, hammer, and torch coral. Be aware that clownfish will not tolerate shrimp in their anemones and will kick the shrimp out. So if you are planning on adding clowns, or you have them currently, do not add sexy shrimp. These shrimp prefer to live in groups of three or more, remaining in odd numbers, however a mated pair is tolerated, or they can be housed singly.

 

Sexy shrimp are diurnal, scavenging for food throughout the day but will usually remain in the anemone as they will eat the anemone’s mucus and uneaten foods in the anemone. They will never stray too far from their host anemone or coral. It is recommended that you should spot feed them daily, with meaty foods, such as raw fish, or shrimp pellets, otherwise the sexy shrimp may start to eat their host. Also when hungry, they will eat the skirts off of zoanthids. Here is a good website for sexy shrimp care, breeding and virtually everything else about them- http://www.sexyshrimp.com/

 

Breeding the sexy shrimp is not difficult, however raising the larvae is challenging. Sexy shrimp are sexually dimorphic and are quite easy to sex. The female usually has a broader abdomen and will also have a broken lateral white stripe along her abdomen. The male will have a smaller abdomen and will have one solid lateral white stripe on his abdomen.

 

SexyShrimpM-F.jpg

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The Urocaridella Genus

Urocaridella sp. (Yellow Line Shrimp)

Uro-4.jpg

Other Common Names:

Care Level: Easy

Aggressiveness: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

Water Conditions: 75-82° F, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025

Maximum Size: 1”

Compatibility to other species: Do not house with fish that will hunt shrimp, such as groupers, anglers or lion fish. This is also a small shrimp, only getting an inch, so be cautious, as many fish that will not typically hunt these shrimp, will eat them.

Origin: Indo-Pacific

Potential Lifespan: 1+ years

Family: Palaemonidae

 

This species is not too common in the industry as it is still relatively new. The Yellow Line Shrimp is better for smaller sized aquariums as they are quite small and can easily be picked off by fish that would usually not even think of eating a shrimp. This shrimp is mostly transparent, with scattered dark red and yellow spots, and a bright yellow line outlining the body of the shrimp. This is a kind of cleaner shrimp and will live in groups in small caves as they advertise their presence by swaying back and forth to passing fish. It is not known if the yellow line shrimp will clean fish in the aquarium. This shrimp does not host any corals or anemones and therefor will have little protection against predators; this is why they should NOT be kept in large systems. I would say 10 gallons or less would be appropriate for keeping these shrimp. These shrimp will scavenge for food, however you may provide them with supplemental feeding. I am unaware on any way to differentiate them between genders.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is my thread! Thanks for reading! Questions, comments, and concerns are all welcome! Also, if there is anything I missed, or you would like to add, tell me, and I will put it up in the thread. I would actually like to have some user’s experiences for all of the species I mentioned, if you are willing, write one and pm it to me where I can then post it where it belongs. I hope this was a useful resource for whoever needed it!

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does anyone like this? 80 views is a lot with no replies. When I say I worked real hard on this, I worked REAL hard on this. You don't even have to read this thing all the way through, as I know it is a lot of information... but just saying "nice work" would mean a lot to me...

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I wanted to comment but i didnt want to ruin the post lol. I like this a lot.

 

Just an idea to add to your posts. You could add experiences from other reefers having certain inverts

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I noticed this when you first posted but I didn't realize that you had finished.

 

I have never heard of the lima shrimp before this thread and it is really helpful although for some reason at the back of my mind I feel that a shrimp is missing from this list.

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Very impressive and helped decide which shrimp im gunna go with, thanks a lot man!

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I wanted to comment but i didnt want to ruin the post lol. I like this a lot.

 

Just an idea to add to your posts. You could add experiences from other reefers having certain inverts

LOL, I already asked here:

"There is my thread! Thanks for reading! Questions, comments, and concerns are all welcome! Also, if there is anything I missed, or you would like to add, tell me, and I will put it up in the thread. I would actually like to have some user’s experiences for all of the species I mentioned, if you are willing, write one and pm it to me where I can then post it where it belongs. I hope this was a useful resource for whoever needed it!"

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LOL, I already asked here:

"There is my thread! Thanks for reading! Questions, comments, and concerns are all welcome! Also, if there is anything I missed, or you would like to add, tell me, and I will put it up in the thread. I would actually like to have some user’s experiences for all of the species I mentioned, if you are willing, write one and pm it to me where I can then post it where it belongs. I hope this was a useful resource for whoever needed it!"

Oh haha I didn't finish reading everything. I felt like you were disappointed by the lack of replies so I had to intervene ASAP lol. Very well put together, concise and easy to understand. Very good job.

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I noticed this when you first posted but I didn't realize that you had finished.

 

I have never heard of the lima shrimp before this thread and it is really helpful although for some reason at the back of my mind I feel that a shrimp is missing from this list.

I have only seen Lima shrimp for sale here and there, but I see them often enough I felt that I should have something on them. And if you can come up with the shrimp you think I am missing, tell me, I want this encyclopedia to be as accurate and up to date as possible.

 

Oh haha I didn't finish reading everything. I felt like you were disappointed by the lack of replies so I had to intervene ASAP lol. Very well put together, concise and easy to understand. Very good job.

Ya, I was getting real worried people did not like the thread, but I am glad to see people do like it. And Thanks!

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And if you can come up with the shrimp you think I am missing, tell me,

I doubt that you are missing anything I just have this feeling though :lol:

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Nice job, thanks for putting this together!

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I was going to say TLDR but, I did read some. but jesus christ its alot of info. Aint nobody got time for all dat info.

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I was going to say TLDR but, I did read some. but jesus christ its alot of info. Aint nobody got time for all dat info.

LOL, but isn't that the point of an encyclopedia! :P

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I think I figured out which shrimp was missing - the marine ghost shrimp.

THANK YOU!!!! I have been raking my mind all night for that.

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This is impressive! How long did it take you to do all this? Regardless, very informative. :)

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