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THE OFFICIAL ASK ALBERT THIEL THREAD

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albertthiel
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The zoa pic is right and the toad stool is tanish,

Hope that helps

Par

amm & nitrites 0

nitrates 10

calcuim 480

alk 10

 

Is the Toad more like these or a with a little darker tentacles (their reaction to water quality would be the same though ....

 

toad3.pngtoad4.png

 

What I suspect is that the Leather coral got affected by a change in the water conditions when you did that water change and closed up but IMO should re-open and be back to normal real soon if not already. I suspect that by tomorrow it will be back to normal.

 

What may have happened is that when you did the water change the temp of the water changed slightly and that affected the Leather or it could have been a minor change in the pH. Toad Leathers are quite sensitive to water quality changes IME

 

Albert

 

 

 

Just retested

cal= 420

alk 9

 

So yes there were water quality param changes as you just indicated and that would have caused the Leather to react to the change (temp an pH would have affected it too).

 

As I said I think all will be OK though by tomorrow IMO

 

Albert

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jgpico

Is it possible to overdose my tank with chemical filtration? I have a 3 gallon tank and was wondering if the big bad of chemi pure would have an ill effect on my tank.

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CAmor07

Thanks, the zoas jjust seemed a little odd, even the yellow star polyps arent really out like they used too be , but thanks for the help

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albertthiel
Is it possible to overdose my tank with chemical filtration? I have a 3 gallon tank and was wondering if the big bad of chemi pure would have an ill effect on my tank.

 

IME that is definitely possible ... for instance over skimming may deplete nutrient levels too much and may lead to die off of some CUC's ... too much carbon can reduce iodine levels in the tank too much and harm any invert and coral that needs iodine.

 

Also changing carbon of not so high quality often or using too much of it can raise your PO4 levels as low quality carbon will leach phosphate in your tank.

 

Some hobbyists in fact do not skim just for the reason I pointed out and some hobbyists do not overdo carbon or other chemical filtration for the same reasons.

 

Read the instructions of the products you buy and follow those and sometimes use a little less ...

 

If you use carbon it is not a bad idea IME to add a supplement that contains iodine as one of its components.

 

Albert

 

 

 

Thanks, the zoas jjust seemed a little odd, even the yellow star polyps arent really out like they used too be , but thanks for the help

 

You are welcome and I think that the variations in the water qual parameters that you pointed out caused the reactions you saw but that will IME only be a temp reaction and things will get back to normal

 

Albert

Edited by albertthiel

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albertthiel
Thanks, the zoas jjust seemed a little odd, even the yellow star polyps arent really out like they used too be , but thanks for the help

 

Are these the Yellow Stars you have and how they looked before the water change

 

yellowstar1.pngyellowstar2.png

 

Albert

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ZephNYC

yall should see the smile on my face :D

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albertthiel
yall should see the smile on my face :D

 

PM me the reason Zeph ..... :):)

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jgpico
yall should see the smile on my face :D

This is really awesome zeph. Not that we don't have a lot of people with a lot of experience on this forum already but man does albert have a lot of experience backed up by books and all kinds of stuff.

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CAmor07

They look lively and flowing now there sunk back and like dull sorta there like rims or pedals arent in the air anymore

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ZephNYC

IME that is definitely possible ... for instance over skimming may deplete nutrient levels too much and may lead to die off of some CUC's ... too much carbon can reduce iodine levels in the tank too much and harm any invert and coral that needs iodine.

 

Also changing carbon of not so high quality often or using too much of it can raise your PO4 levels as low quality carbon will leach phosphate in your tank.

 

Some hobbyists in fact do not skim just for the reason I pointed out and some hobbyists do not overdo carbon or other chemical filtration for the same reasons.

 

Read the instructions of the products you buy and follow those and sometimes use a little less ...

 

If you use carbon it is not a bad idea IME to add a supplement that contains iodine as one of its components.

 

Albert

 

Alberrrtttttt!!!

I would like to add that i run HEAVY HEAVY HEAVY carbon on my reef tanks. I am talking multiple reactors for carbon and custom chemi pure reactors made from old calcium reactors. And everything looks great. Carbon is changed every two weeks. I do daily water changes , which keeps calcium and trace elements good. All I have to do is add a little buffer daily. I have my reasons for using so much - deffinitely not for everyone.

Hey Albert, here is a good question for you. I do not think it has been PROVED the carbon reduced iodine. Julian Sprung wasnt sure. I havnt tested my systems for iodine in ages, but with the extreme carbon I use, if it does indeed remove iodine, mine should be very low. Ill let yas knowwwwwwwwww

Edited by ZephNYC

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albertthiel
They look lively and flowing now there sunk back and like dull sorta there like rims or pedals arent in the air anymore

 

Give it some time CAmor07

 

I think everything should be back to normal by tomorrow ... due to the slight changes in water qual params the corals reacted to it and now have to adjust to whatever the water qual is now

 

Albert

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ZephNYC
This is really awesome zeph. Not that we don't have a lot of people with a lot of experience on this forum already but man does albert have a lot of experience backed up by books and all kinds of stuff.

 

Jgp,

Even more awesome is that we have respectful, serious, intelligent hobbyist like yourself, that can take advantage of Alberts expertise, as well as inspire him to continue his research and basically just have fun with it all. THank you!!!

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albertthiel
Alberrrtttttt!!!

I would like to add that i run HEAVY HEAVY HEAVY carbon on my reef tanks. I am talking multiple reactors for carbon and custom chemi pure rectors made from old calcium reactors. And everything looks great. Carbon is changed every two weeks. I do daily water changes , which keeps calcium and trace elements good. All I have to do is add a little buffer daily. I have my reasons for using so much - deffinitely not for everyone.

Hey Albert, here is a good question for you. I do not think it has been PROVED the carbon reduced iodine. Julian Sprung wasnt sure. I havnt tested my systems for iodine in ages, but with the extreme carbon I use, if it does indeed remove iodine, mine should be very low. Ill let yas knowwwwwwwwww

 

I'll look up some more references for you and post them tomorrow morning or so but IME yes it does remove iodine but I'll look for some more definitive references and let you know.

 

As you say running extreme chemical filtration may not be for everyone but if it works for you then there must be a reason ... maybe a real heavy load, or a tank where due to allelopathy processes taking place that amount of high chemical filtration keeps things in balance ....

 

I'll look into it some more

 

Albert

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castiel

I have one for you, Albert, as I am sure you have dealt with this in the past.

 

I have a 12G nano tank with shallow sandbed, live rock and various corals (hammers, chalice, zoas, acro). Inhabitants include hermits, snails, pistol shrimp, peppermint shrimp, coral goby, orange lined cardinal.

 

Last weekend I introduced a pair of juvenile black ocellaris clownfish, tank bred. After two days I noticed the telltale signs of ich ... not much, but there.

 

The clowns appear perfectly healthy, eating, hosting.

 

 

I've read up up ich as I have never dealt with it before and it seems like there are three proven solutions to eradicating - hyposalinity, copper, and the '3 day transfer' method. From what I have read I am leaning towards the transfer method, given the small number and size of the fish and tank, and the stress that the other solutions appear to inflict.

 

However I have also received advice from more than one person to just 'leave it be'.

 

Your advice?

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jgpico

I have another one for you. I have a 14 gallon biocube that recently developed a little bit of an aiptasia outbreak. I have tried the alk paste with no success, I have also tried peppermint shrimp with no success. In your experience what has been the best most effective way to irradicate aiptasia? I'm about to blow my tank up if I can't get rid of these things. :wacko:

 

I also know that not all peppermints are created equally but I had success in the past when I added a pep shrimp to my 3 gallon for the same issue and within 5 mins the little bastards were gone. I got the second pep shrimp from the same source and It wouldn't touch the aiptasia. I just wanted to give you a heads up before I got the pep shrimp talk lol.

Edited by jgpicodope009

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albertthiel
I have one for you, Albert, as I am sure you have dealt with this in the past.

 

I have a 12G nano tank with shallow sandbed, live rock and various corals (hammers, chalice, zoas, acro). Inhabitants include hermits, snails, pistol shrimp, peppermint shrimp, coral goby, orange lined cardinal.

 

Last weekend I introduced a pair of juvenile black ocellaris clownfish, tank bred. After two days I noticed the telltale signs of ich ... not much, but there.

 

The clowns appear perfectly healthy, eating, hosting.

 

 

I've read up up ich as I have never dealt with it before and it seems like there are three proven solutions to eradicating - hyposalinity, copper, and the '3 day transfer' method. From what I have read I am leaning towards the transfer method, given the small number and size of the fish and tank, and the stress that the other solutions appear to inflict.

 

However I have also received advice from more than one person to just 'leave it be'.

 

Your advice?

 

For now leave it alone but if you see that the fish start getting more and more spots and that breathing becomes more and more difficult (gill infection) then you are going to need to use one of the methods you outlined.

 

IME I used to treat them in a separate small tank with water from the main tank and dose with copper until they were cured and then re-acclimate them to the main tank. I cannot recall negative effects or situations from using that method. The hypo salinity works according to some but IME it did stress the fish a lot and did not cure them

 

To get rid of the Ich or the Crypto the fish need to start developing a thicker layer of slime so that the parasites are unable to continue to live on them and fall off them gradually the fish looks free of them.

 

Here is link to an article on ich and crypto

 

http://www.bestfish.com/saltich.html

 

Albert

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ZephNYC
I'll look up some more references for you and post them tomorrow morning or so but IME yes it does remove iodine but I'll look for some more definitive references and let you know.

 

As you say running extreme chemical filtration may not be for everyone but if it works for you then there must be a reason ... maybe a real heavy load, or a tank where due to allelopathy processes taking place that amount of high chemical filtration keeps things in balance ....

 

I'll look into it some more

 

Albert

 

Hey Albert, be careful what you ask for you may just get it - Looks like we are going to keep you busy with this thread.

I use an insane amount of carbon and chemi pure because I need iron removed from my systems as fast as possible. I have very unique requirements in my battle against pinched Mantle disease

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albertthiel
I have another one for you. I have a 14 gallon biocube that recently developed a little bit of an aiptasia outbreak. I have tried the alk paste with no success, I have also tried peppermint shrimp with no success. In your experience what has been the best most effective way to irradicate aiptasia? I'm about to blow my tank up if I can't get rid of these things. :wacko:

 

IME injecting them with kalkwasser has always worked ... instead of injecting them with cold KW heat it up first and then inject them.

 

Alternatively use Peppermint shrimp as that is often a recommended method so I am a bit surprised that it did not work for you ... but here is a link to other methods

 

http://reefkeeping.com/joomla/index.php/re...cating-aiptasia

 

Albert

 

 

 

 

 

Hey Albert, be careful what you ask for you may just get it - Looks like we are going to keep you busy with this thread.

I use an insane amount of carbon and chemi pure because I need iron removed from my systems as fast as possible. I have very unique requirements in my battle against pinched Mantle disease

 

Yes indeed Zeph ... that is why I said that you may have special reasons to do so and with the Pinched Mantle disease and the clams you obviously have requirements that others may not have ...

 

Hopefully yes NR members will keep me busy :)

 

Albert

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jgpico
IME injecting them with kalkwasser has always worked ... instead of injecting them with cold KW heat it up first and then inject them.

 

Alternatively use Peppermint shrimp as that is often a recommended method so I am a bit surprised that it did not work for you ... but here is a link to other methods

 

http://reefkeeping.com/joomla/index.php/re...cating-aiptasia

 

Albert

After you inject them is it best to do a wc right away or wait a little so the kalk has a little time to go to work?

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Propaganda

While we are talking about toadstool corals. My toadstool retracts and puckers up like a sourpuss every morning. He stays this way a couple of hours and then extends and is glorious the rest of the day. He his perfectly healthy and happy, but I am curious about this behavior. Is this normal? And if so, why do toadstools do this? He is on quite the regular schedule!

 

Photo of said toadstool:

 

DSCF5355.jpg

 

This, of course, is in "Happy" mode. :D

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albertthiel
Hey Albert, be careful what you ask for you may just get it - Looks like we are going to keep you busy with this thread.

I use an insane amount of carbon and chemi pure because I need iron removed from my systems as fast as possible. I have very unique requirements in my battle against pinched Mantle disease

 

I'll still look up the iodine issue and post what I find in the morning as I am about to sign off for the evening

 

Albert

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ZephNYC
I have another one for you. I have a 14 gallon biocube that recently developed a little bit of an aiptasia outbreak. I have tried the alk paste with no success, I have also tried peppermint shrimp with no success. In your experience what has been the best most effective way to irradicate aiptasia? I'm about to blow my tank up if I can't get rid of these things. :wacko:

 

I also know that not all peppermints are created equally but I had success in the past when I added a pep shrimp to my 3 gallon for the same issue and within 5 mins the little bastards were gone. I got the second pep shrimp from the same source and It wouldn't touch the aiptasia. I just wanted to give you a heads up before I got the pep shrimp talk lol.

 

I am having an aptasia outbreak in my clam qt tank, and will be adding Berghia Nudibranch, which I love. THey work great in small tanks, when aptasia eating fish are too big. I have raised them before and will soon be asking people to send me their aptasias for a food source.

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castiel
For now leave it alone but if you see that the fish start getting more and more spots and that breathing becomes more and more difficult (gill infection) then you are going to need to use one of the methods you outlined.

 

IME I used to treat them in a separate small tank with water from the main tank and dose with copper until they were cured and then re-acclimate them to the main tank. I cannot recall negative effects or situations from using that method. The hypo salinity works according to some but IME it did stress the fish a lot and did not cure them

 

To get rid of the Ich or the Crypto the fish need to start developing a thicker layer of slime so that the parasites are unable to continue to live on them and fall off them gradually the fish looks free of them.

 

Here is link to an article on ich and crypto

 

http://www.bestfish.com/saltich.html

 

Albert

Thanks for this. I'll see how it goes over the next few days, for now their condition has not worsened so hopefully it won't be a big issue.

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albertthiel
After you inject them is it best to do a wc right away or wait a little so the kalk has a little time to go to work?

 

Inject as many as you need to and then wait for maybe 30 minutes and start sucking them out and after all of that is done then yes I suggest a water change although if you can remove all of them by using a good strong baster you may not have to do a water change

 

I would say that there is nothing wrong with doing so but it may not be necessary

 

Albert

 

Thanks for this. I'll see how it goes over the next few days, for now their condition has not worsened so hopefully it won't be a big issue.

 

If it does to get to their gills you may just be OK and not have to do anything but IME it usually will progress so some intervention will be needed.

 

As you say take a wait and see attitude for now and then decide what may have to be done to cure them of the ich or crypto

 

Albert

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albertthiel
While we are talking about toadstool corals. My toadstool retracts and puckers up like a sourpuss every morning. He stays this way a couple of hours and then extends and is glorious the rest of the day. He his perfectly healthy and happy, but I am curious about this behavior. Is this normal? And if so, why do toadstools do this? He is on quite the regular schedule!

 

Photo of said toadstool:

 

DSCF5355.jpg

 

This, of course, is in "Happy" mode. :D

 

Leather corals tend to go through phases were at times they will have their small tentacles extended and at times not. IME often in the morning when the lights are not on you could see either of the two behaviors.

 

Remember that they feed in two ways : trapping food and photosynthesis

 

Here is a good link to various species and their requirements:

 

http://www.aquacon.com/softcoral.html

 

Albert

 

 

I am having an aptasia outbreak in my clam qt tank, and will be adding Berghia Nudibranch, which I love. THey work great in small tanks, when aptasia eating fish are too big. I have raised them before and will soon be asking people to send me their aptasias for a food source.

 

Yes Berghia are indeed great as long as you have the food source ... :)

 

At least now they are easier to get than a number of years ago when it was first discovered that they actually feed on them

 

Albert

Edited by albertthiel

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