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100 gallons behind a wall

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SO. MUCH. ROCK.

 

SO.

 

MUCH.

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Did you take out a home equity loan to afford all that?

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SO. MUCH. ROCK. SO. MUCH.

I'm embarrassed to say that I actually have more. :lol:

 

Did you take out a home equity loan to afford all that?

For all the rock? :) Nah, I just had to use my car as collateral. I did some of the work myself, so the room wasn't insanely expensive.

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I'm embarrassed to say that I actually have more. :lol:

 

Oh god lol

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OK, lights back on. Good news, nothing died. Bad news, nothing died. :lol:

 

A couple of Rock Flower Anemones started looking for light. Oops!

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That's an idea! But we have a little wine bar on the next level (although I'm not much of a wine drinker).

 

Our basement is primarily for storage. We just spruced it up a bit. Being behind a wall will let people enjoy it without having to see all the equipment (RO/DI, water storage, sink, other tanks, etc).

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That's an idea! But we have a little wine bar on the next level (although I'm not much of a wine drinker).

 

Our basement is primarily for storage. We just spruced it up a bit. Being behind a wall will let people enjoy it without having to see all the equipment (RO/DI, water storage, sink, other tanks, etc).

 

I doubt your doing all this just so you can have a tank in a storage room. Smells like man cave to me.

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:lol: Well, it will have an arcade cabinet that I refurbished, and a little Pepsi vending machine fridge. We'll see what else I can get away with.

 

I think you need a beer mister behind your wall and a tap sticking out of the wall next to the tank.

 

Where spongebob meets pacman. epic!

 

If you turned that arcade cabinet into an aquarium you could be in Tanked. lol

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Picked up a couple of these to clean some rocks:

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Next step, some lumber for a stand.

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Been thinking about acid bathing my dry rock that will be used in my zeovit system to get rid of any kinds of phosphate producers buried deep inside. Do you really think its necessary? What made you want to bath your rocks, out of curiosity?

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Basically, if your dry rock isn't like bone white, it has stuff on it to either break down or release phosphate.

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I know that I will be stripping the rock that's currently in my holding tank. It's full of Bryopsis algae and I can't get it under control. It had been exposed to high phosphate levels in the past.

 

I haven't tested my new dry rock yet, but have read enough threads about it that I'll probably strip those too (but I question how necessary it will be). However, I will test the rock before and after (if I can detect any leaching).

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It is bone white on the surface, but I worry about what may be deep in the holes. lol

 

Keep us posted on your tests. I'm interested.

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Not sure where you guys get your rocks from, but I have had great luck buying from marcorocks. I've pretty much exclusively used dry rock from there for every single one of my tanks and I have never had algae, nitrate, OR phosphate issues. I do believe they age their dry rock though, so it may have something to do with that and why there's no hidden phosphate or nitrate producers inside the rocks.

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Not sure where you guys get your rocks from, but I have had great luck buying from marcorocks. I've pretty much exclusively used dry rock from there for every single one of my tanks and I have never had algae, nitrate, OR phosphate issues. I do believe they age their dry rock though, so it may have something to do with that and why there's no hidden phosphate or nitrate producers inside the rocks.

 

What do you use to check phosphate? The reason I am so concerned is because this additive I am going to use boosts everything. Its meant for coral growth and health, but if there's any sort of algae going on in that tank, it boosts that too.

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I use a Hanna Phosphate Checker. For my test, I'm going to put a couple dry rocks into a 5 gallon bucket of water with 0.000 ppm of phosphate. After a day, I'll test again. Zer0, I'm also using Marco Rocks (which I haven't read any complaints about).

 

 

Finally got the wood for my stand. I'm heading out to start making some cuts (I'll take some pics).

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standa.jpgspace.gifstandb.jpg


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I'm using a Kreg Jig. All I had time for was the bottom.

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If you're using screws, that supersedes the need for glue, as that will just make it a hassle to pull apart if need be :P

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Wow, very nice build plan and area. The construction looks great! Can't wait to see the finished product.

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Alright, I got a little ahead of myself. I thought I'd double check if the plumbing for the overflow drain would fit (I've been thinking it would be kind of tight). Here's what I have to work with:

 

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The lower left corner in the picture is the back corner of the tank. There is only approximately 5/8" between the inside panel and the drainpipe hole (or about 1" from the outside of the tank to the hole). Why they didn't swap the return and drainpipe holes, I have no idea. :( That would have been so much better.

 

So my dilemma is that the 2 x 6 frame is 1.5" thick and I only have an inch to the edge of the hole (the outer part of the bulkhead). Now granted, the actual drainpipe will be 1/4" smaller in radius, so that helps a little. However, the bulkhead nut is about 3/8" larger in radius than the hole. So not only would I have a notch for the drainpipe, but I have to cut the plywood support top for the bulkhead nut and an even larger notch in the frame (at least 2 1/2" deep) for the bulkhead itself.

 

I'm thinking that I need about 3/8" more on both sides, so that I don't need to notch the frame for the drainpipe itself. This should still give enough support as the tank would be supported by a little more than an inch of the frame.

 

However, I'd still need to notch the frame for the bulkhead. I think I could assemble the bulkhead and tighten it without water in the tank, but I see future maintenance on the bulkheads being a huge problem. Plus, I have overflows on both sides (for twice the fun). :rolleyes:

 

So now I'm thinking that I should switch to UNISEAL bulkheads. They aren't as big and I wouldn't have to figure out how to tighten them in such a tight space.

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It doesn't seem like much, but I'm going to rebuild the stand 3/4" longer (good thing I didn't get further on my stand), and order 4 UNISEAL bulkheads. If I need to notch the frame for the UNISEALs, it shouldn't be much and I doubt that it would affect the integrity of the stand.

 

Anybody see any glaring holes in my logic?

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