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Question about frog spawn...


chabooky386

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Do frog spawns retract at night and bloom fully again during the day time? I noticed mine today only opened up half way. I just turned on my lights 3 hours ago.

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Flow can have a lot to do with it. Also is this a new coral? It takes them time to adjust to your tank. My spawn is under one of my moonlights, and it still retracts at night, but not fully. Just after the lights go off it seems to stay open for a short period then retracts to 1/4-1/2 its normal size. They also retract after eating, so sometimes if it gets a bite of fish food or something it can retract even if the lights are on. If its inflating, chances are its healthy. Its when it deflates for days at a time you should worry. Hope that helps

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I just saw you started cycling on Jan 16th, that may be your problem. Frogs can be early indicators of bad water, meaning theyre the first to show stress, it may be too soon to add a coral like that, but since you have it, id do a 20% water change, itll set you back on cycling a bit but it should help the frog out, then try a 10%saturday or sunday, and keep checkin you parameters. Its just hard to build up the biological filters you need to have in your tank in 2 weeks. But we all did it w our early tanks. How much rock do you have? Im just tryin to get an idea of your tanks ability to handle your bioload. But on a good note, my corals that went thru tough times are much more resiliant now bc of it.

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I just saw you started cycling on Jan 16th, that may be your problem. Frogs can be early indicators of bad water, meaning theyre the first to show stress, it may be too soon to add a coral like that, but since you have it, id do a 20% water change, itll set you back on cycling a bit but it should help the frog out, then try a 10%saturday or sunday, and keep checkin you parameters. Its just hard to build up the biological filters you need to have in your tank in 2 weeks. But we all did it w our early tanks. How much rock do you have? Im just tryin to get an idea of your tanks ability to handle your bioload. But on a good note, my corals that went thru tough times are much more resiliant now bc of it.

 

I have about 2lbs of live rock and 40lbs of live sand. I used bio spira also. I waited awhile too to check my levels before I added anything. My levels have been fine for now. I am slowly adding stuff to the tank.

 

Flow can have a lot to do with it. Also is this a new coral? It takes them time to adjust to your tank. My spawn is under one of my moonlights, and it still retracts at night, but not fully. Just after the lights go off it seems to stay open for a short period then retracts to 1/4-1/2 its normal size. They also retract after eating, so sometimes if it gets a bite of fish food or something it can retract even if the lights are on. If its inflating, chances are its healthy. Its when it deflates for days at a time you should worry. Hope that helps

 

I just noticed today it didn't open as much as before. Thats why i am a bit worried.

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2lbs rock and 40lbs sand? Is that right? What kind of lights do you have? Unless the rock is straight vertical with the frog right on top maybe its now getting enough light?

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Bio spira helps but its not all its supposed to be. If your going for the deep sand bed method that does work, but it takes more like 3-6 months before its able to sustain itself and your bioload, even though its live sand you have to remember its preserved life, so it hasnt had oxygen or movement in probly a year or so, so it takes a little time to get "shocked" back into life. I think a water change couldnt hurt you, and let us kno about what lights your using, and about the rock/sand(if what u said is right). Also where is the coral placed under the light(how far from it)

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Whoops, i see now. T5s. Ok they should be fine. K, few more questions, are you strictly using a mechanical filter? Any skimmer? If youve only got 2lbs live rock then that isnt gonna cut it. In a 20 gal you should have 30lbs or so of rock for sufficient bio filtration, but w a deep sanddbed that may b wrong(never used more than an inch or so myself) and so a skimmer is a must unless you have that. Also how often do you feed?

 

Ps. I hope im not comin off like a jerk, dont mean it like that at all, just askin so we cAn help you, it helps to know all the facts.

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Nick, nice catch on the start date. I missed that. That said, depending on the brand of "live" sand, his tank may have never had a cycle or even need one. Such are the benefits of true live sand.

 

If it's OceanDirect, then it hasn't been siting on a shelf for a year, but was scooped from the ocean a week or two before shipping. I used it myself and never had or needed a cycle. I couldn't tell you with regards to other brands, but I know there are some pretty iffy "live" sands out there.

 

If it's not true live sand, then yeah, the coral could be suffering. Is it ejecting material at all? That's usually the sign. Tho they can do it normally after a good filter feeding as well.

 

As a frog spawn polyp dies, it won't just retract and not just at night. It will actually start to pull away from skeleton, like a receding gum line. Eventually all the flesh compacts into the very bottom of the crevice, with only dead flesh ever slipping out.

 

Too high of sustained flow can do this. Frog spawn are a low flow coral and die a slow anguishing death in high current.

 

If you're worried, do the usual ammonia, nitrite, nitrate tests and tell us the results.

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2lbs rock and 40lbs sand? Is that right? What kind of lights do you have? Unless the rock is straight vertical with the frog right on top maybe its now getting enough light?

 

Sorry I forgot to mention I have 25lbs of dry rock

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Nick, nice catch on the start date. I missed that. That said, depending on the brand of "live" sand, his tank may have never had a cycle or even need one. Such are the benefits of true live sand.

 

If it's OceanDirect, then it hasn't been siting on a shelf for a year, but was scooped from the ocean a week or two before shipping. I used it myself and never had or needed a cycle. I couldn't tell you with regards to other brands, but I know there are some pretty iffy "live" sands out there.

 

If it's not true live sand, then yeah, the coral could be suffering. Is it ejecting material at all? That's usually the sign. Tho they can do it normally after a good filter feeding as well.

 

As a frog spawn polyp dies, it won't just retract and not just at night. It will actually start to pull away from skeleton, like a receding gum line. Eventually all the flesh compacts into the very bottom of the crevice, with only dead flesh ever slipping out.

 

Too high of sustained flow can do this. Frog spawn are a low flow coral and die a slow anguishing death in high current.

 

If you're worried, do the usual ammonia, nitrite, nitrate tests and tell us the results.

 

 

It is sitting about 5 inches away from my quad t5's and my levels are all reading 0. I don't see any material coming out from the corals. But, I do notice it not blooming at full potential. The flow in my tank is good but, it isn't being blasted by my Vortech. My head is at the left and my frog spawn is on the very right of my tank.

 

Nick, nice catch on the start date. I missed that. That said, depending on the brand of "live" sand, his tank may have never had a cycle or even need one. Such are the benefits of true live sand.

 

If it's OceanDirect, then it hasn't been siting on a shelf for a year, but was scooped from the ocean a week or two before shipping. I used it myself and never had or needed a cycle. I couldn't tell you with regards to other brands, but I know there are some pretty iffy "live" sands out there.

 

If it's not true live sand, then yeah, the coral could be suffering. Is it ejecting material at all? That's usually the sign. Tho they can do it normally after a good filter feeding as well.

 

As a frog spawn polyp dies, it won't just retract and not just at night. It will actually start to pull away from skeleton, like a receding gum line. Eventually all the flesh compacts into the very bottom of the crevice, with only dead flesh ever slipping out.

 

Too high of sustained flow can do this. Frog spawn are a low flow coral and die a slow anguishing death in high current.

 

If you're worried, do the usual ammonia, nitrite, nitrate tests and tell us the results.

 

 

It is sitting about 5 inches away from my quad t5's and my levels are all reading 0. I don't see any material coming out from the corals. But, I do notice it not blooming at full potential. The flow in my tank is good but, it isn't being blasted by my Vortech. My head is at the left and my frog spawn is on the very right of my tank.

 

Also I used CaribSea live sand

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It is sitting about 5 inches away from my quad t5's and my levels are all reading 0. I don't see any material coming out from the corals. But, I do notice it not blooming at full potential. The flow in my tank is good but, it isn't being blasted by my Vortech. My head is at the left and my frog spawn is on the very right of my tank.

 

 

 

 

It is sitting about 5 inches away from my quad t5's and my levels are all reading 0. I don't see any material coming out from the corals. But, I do notice it not blooming at full potential. The flow in my tank is good but, it isn't being blasted by my Vortech. My head is at the left and my frog spawn is on the very right of my tank.

 

Also I used CaribSea live sand

 

Probably just need to give it some time. Could be light shock if it used to be in a darker tank. If the colors start to bleach out, give it some shade.

 

CaribSea makes OceanDirect, so you have a winner there. Your tank won't cycle and you could probably stand to add some clean up crew if you haven't already, but you will notice your tank go thru several changes as the live sand slowly exhausts its excess biotope. By that I mean it's full of beneficial lifeforms that can't hope to establish a self sustaining colony in a home aquarium. They'll super-charge your tank for now while a fairly predictable series of bursts of biological activity come and go over the next 6 months or so. You'll see tons of mysis shrimp one month, only to be replaced by an over supply of Colonista snails. They don't hurt anything, but I had so many snails at one point, they were actually having an impact on my calcium levels. Eventually they'll go away too.

 

+1 on the DSB. I've had mine for 3 years now, have never vacuumed the sand bed, and never show any nitrates. Just be good to it and watch it's health. Try to cultivate as many spegetti worms as you can. They come as hitchhikers and will multiply in an undisturbed sand bed. Probably the healthiest things a DSB can have.

 

A skimmer is almost never a bad idea. The worst it will do is very little. And chances are, it'll do much more than that. :)

 

Also, Nick is giving good advice. You'll want more liverock in the long run.

 

Hope this helps!

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Probably just need to give it some time. Could be light shock if it used to be in a darker tank. If the colors start to bleach out, give it some shade.

 

CaribSea makes OceanDirect, so you have a winner there. Your tank won't cycle and you could probably stand to add some clean up crew if you haven't already, but you will notice your tank go thru several changes as the live sand slowly exhausts its excess biotope. By that I mean it's full of beneficial lifeforms that can't hope to establish a self sustaining colony in a home aquarium. They'll super-charge your tank for now while a fairly predictable series of bursts of biological activity come and go over the next 6 months or so. You'll see tons of mysis shrimp one month, only to be replaced by an over supply of Colonista snails. They don't hurt anything, but I had so many snails at one point, they were actually having an impact on my calcium levels. Eventually they'll go away too.

 

+1 on the DSB. I've had mine for 3 years now, have never vacuumed the sand bed, and never show any nitrates. Just be good to it and watch it's health. Try to cultivate as many spegetti worms as you can. They come as hitchhikers and will multiply in an undisturbed sand bed. Probably the healthiest things a DSB can have.

 

A skimmer is almost never a bad idea. The worst it will do is very little. And chances are, it'll do much more than that. :)

 

Also, Nick is giving good advice. You'll want more liverock in the long run.

 

Hope this helps!

 

Thank for all your help. I'll definitely keep an eye out on my levels and readings. But, what is DSB? And, I'll need to find some room for a skimmer. My aqueon 55/75 filter is huge on my tank. I have about 35 lbs of rock in my tank at the moment but, only 2lbs of it is live.

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DSB = deep sand bed.

 

The rest of the rock will become increasingly live over time, and will ultimately do more for your tank than a skimmer. Just go super easy with fish until you get a sense for how much bioload your aqueon and rock will currently handle. Eventually you may decide a skimmer is worth the trouble, or you may decide you like having a coral dominated low bioload tank and a skimmer just isn't important to you. But given your choice of hobby, I'd say it's more than likely, you'll keep modifying your system to suit your needs as you gain experience.

 

Ever consider a sump? B)

 

Go slow and watch your pocket book. Remember, it's not about having the ultimate tank, it's about having the ultimate experience. The Japanies have been doing just that with just gold fish for literally a century.

 

Have fun!

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DSB = deep sand bed.

 

The rest of the rock will become increasingly live over time, and will ultimately do more for your tank than a skimmer. Just go super easy with fish until you get a sense for how much bioload your aqueon and rock will currently handle. Eventually you may decide a skimmer is worth the trouble, or you may decide you like having a coral dominated low bioload tank and a skimmer just isn't important to you. But given your choice of hobby, I'd say it's more than likely, you'll keep modifying your system to suit your needs as you gain experience.

 

Ever consider a sump? B)

 

Go slow and watch your pocket book. Remember, it's not about having the ultimate tank, it's about having the ultimate experience. The Japanies have been doing just that with just gold fish for literally a century.

 

Have fun!

 

I had a sump on my old tank and that was nothing but a nightmare. I would like to have one but then again I am cramped for space. I'll definitely keep an eye out for critters. I'll take it slow for now. I am also using purple up too.

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Cool. Great advise! Just wanted to mention, watch using purple up, i had a problem with that when i started out reefing. It raises calcium, and mag, but can swing ph and alk. That can be dangerous if your using a lower end test. Meaning the strips ect that dont test for calcium and mg. Your dry rock will change and become live and full of purple and pink coraline, purple up can speed it up, but it happens kinda fast anyway, you may be safer just letting nature happen. That purple up can piss corals off, but it also depends on how often ect. Anyway, goodluck. Any improvement in the frogspawn? I noticed a few posts about peoples frogs acting weird. It couldve been as stupid as a weird lunar cycle or somethin. My frog is in the process of splitting/branching. Its amazing to watch. Freaked me out at first tho.

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