metrokat

Macro ID

33 posts in this topic

What is the green and red macros here:

IMG_3731.JPG

 

And the fuchsia one here:

IMG_2190.JPG

 

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

fuchsia one looks like gracilaria

 

i forge the name of the green one ..but be careful it grows too fast for most peoples preference

Edited by TinyGiant

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The green one is probably a caulerpa from the look of the runners

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you know what geographic region the green plant originated from? It looks like Caulerpa verticilata.

Edited by grmoore

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Florida waters

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ive had the same stuff growing in my tank for a while now too. Mine doesnt seem to grow very fast at all. Not sure on the ID though.

 

Now that I look at Caulerpa Virticilata I have to say that is correct ID Grmoore to the rescue. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That caulerpa seems to have bad reviews, should I nuke it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ive had it in my tank for 5 months without it spreading from the rock in is on. Its all up to you, has it been growing real fast in your tank?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the green macro in your first picture is a baby plant of Caulerpa racemosa var. peltata. If it is - NUKE IT NOW! If you can, take that rock and break off the portions where it's growing on. Better yet, throw that entire rock away. Why? Cuz if it is the variety I think it is, that thing WILL TAKE OVER YOUR TANK and choke out all other macros and corals. With very little nutrients it can grow very fast. And - if you try pulling it out and just a few cells of roots remain, in just a few weeks time it will form a new plant and start to grow again. The problem is when it does this, sometimes it develops it root and rhizome structure first before you notice the larger "flattened leaves". By the time you do notice the leaves, it may already have an extensive root and rhizome network in your rocks.

 

Sorry Kat, not trying to scare you but in this case it's definitely better to be safe than sorry.

 

Hope that helps.

Edited by RESONANCE

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That green stuff is what went sexual on me a few weeks ago!

It can spread like crazy at times and seems to come and go in my tank. I have used a toothbrush to remove it but it just comes back. After it went sexual in my tank there is no sign of it... but i know it will be back again

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think the green macro in your first picture is a baby plant of Caulerpa racemosa var. peltata. If it is - NUKE IT NOW! If you can, take that rock and break off the portions where it's growing on. Better yet, throw that entire rock away. Why? Cuz if it is the variety I think it is, that thing WILL TAKE OVER YOUR TANK and choke out all other macros and corals. With very little nutrients it can grow very fast. And - if you try pulling it out and just a few cells of roots remain, in just a few weeks time it will form a new plant and start to grow again. The problem is when it does this, sometimes it develops it root and rhizome structure first before you notice the larger "flattened leaves". By the time you do notice the leaves, it may already have an extensive root and rhizome network in your rocks.

 

Sorry Kat, not trying to scare you but in this case it's definitely better to be safe than sorry.

 

Hope that helps.

 

Based on the blades, I doubt this is racemosa or peltata which have a more grape-like appearance. I don't have any experience with verticilata growth rates, but in general, all Caulerpa sp. require trimming of the runners to keep them under control.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

unless a plant can grow enough in one day, to take over my tank, there is no such thing as a plant growing too fast. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Grmoore,

 

I used to be a Landscape Architect (no, not a 'gardener' lol) and sometimes I use abbreviations thinking other people would understand horticultural terms so let me explain...

 

In horticulture, the abbreviation "var." is used to signify that this is a stable mutation variety/variant of this particular plant.

 

So when I said: Caulerpa racemosa var. peltata - I was refering to a very specific variant of Caulerpa racemosa, specifically the variant known as "peltata" and NOT 2 types of caulerpas.

 

And btw I think it could be either of 2 types of varients of C. racemosa, specifically peltata and possibly turbinata:

 

Caulerpa racemosa var. peltata:

http://www.algaebase.org/search/species/de...species_id=3767

http://www.algaebase.org/_mediafiles/algae...m6CGgoATGbB.jpg

http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_quer...+4444+0311+6613

http://live-plants.com/mushroom.htm

 

Caulerpa racemosa var. turbinata:

http://www.wildsingapore.com/wildfacts/pla...eltatasmall.htm

 

Regardless of which type, there is very little doubt to me that it's a type of Caulerpa racemosa which is a very aggressive macro. And since Kat keeps corals in her tank, I would still strongly urge her to take that rock and chuck it. Otherwise if she does chose to keep it for aesthetic preferences, in the future she will need to trim it once to twice a week when it gets bigger. If not, risk losing her corals from either being choked out of space and light and/or from parts of this caulerpa going sexual. I'm saying this merely from personal observation not just a strong bias against a particular plant. This type (racemosa) is probably the most aggressively growing type of caulerpa that I have seen.

 

 

Based on the blades, I doubt this is racemosa or peltata which have a more grape-like appearance. I don't have any experience with verticilata growth rates, but in general, all Caulerpa sp. require trimming of the runners to keep them under control.
Edited by RESONANCE

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think you're noticing the many layers of flat blades in the picture. I have C. racemosa var. pelata in one of my tanks and it looks very different than the OP's picture. Based on physical appearance, I agree with GR in his identification.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the slight morphological difference in the number of layers of blades, and the thickness of the runners are due to the fact that the OP's picture show an infant caulerpa, perhaps just a few weeks old, post spore stage. If she lets it grow I believe that it will develop more layers of blades as well as thicker runners.

 

I don't think you're noticing the many layers of flat blades in the picture. I have C. racemosa var. pelata in one of my tanks and it looks very different than the OP's picture. Based on physical appearance, I agree with GR in his identification.
Edited by RESONANCE

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think the slight morphological difference in the number of layers of blades, and the thickness of the runners are due to the fact that the OP's picture show an infant caulerpa, perhaps just a few weeks old, post spore stage. If she lets it grow I believe that it will develop more layers of blades as well as thicker runners.

I think you're missing the point. The racemosa variants you are talking about do not have layers of blades, they have a single blade

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No offense alto, but maybe you're the one missing the point? It's very apparent it's an infant plant and so it's physical appearance can be a bit different from what the 'adult' version looks like.

 

Regardless, the only way we'll know for sure is if the OP choses to keep it and let it grow for a few months. But by then if it is the varients I think it is, it would be fully entrenched in most of her rockwork - at which stage it's practically impossible to get rid without killing other life on the rocks it on. So it's up to Kat.

 

To us it's just academic, but to her, she's invested a good chunk of her time and money on corals and other macro algae in the tank, thus my suggestion.

 

I think you're missing the point. The racemosa variants you are talking about do not have layers of blades, they have a single blade
Edited by RESONANCE

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
No offense alto, but maybe you're the one missing the point? It's very apparent it's an infant plant and so it's physical appearance can be a bit different from what the 'adult' version looks like.

 

Regardless, the only way we'll know for sure is if the OP choses to keep it and let it grow for a few months. But by then if it is the varients I think it is, it would be fully entrenched in most of her rockwork - at which stage it's practically impossible to get rid without killing other life on the rocks it on. So it's up to Kat.

 

To us it's just academic, but to her, she's invested a good chunk of her time and money on corals and other macro algae in the tank, thus my suggestion.

Sorry if it seems like I'm trying to start a fight. It's difficult to convey tone over the internet. You may very well be right, but I'm talking from experience in having C. racemosa var. peltata popping up in my reef tank. I know exactly what it looks like in it's juvenile and adult forms and the blades are very different than the OP's macro. You are right that it grows fast, but it doesn't grow nearly as fast as you are implying. Even with a slightly elevated phosphate level, as long as I rip mine out once a month, it never leaves the small rock it's on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the clarification on the use of var - I didn't know that, so I'll keep that in mind. :)

 

I still think it is Caulerpa verticilata based on the plant shape and tiered blades. I also think this is a fairly mature plant based on the length of the stipe which appears to be about an inch.

 

I do, however, agree that the plant will gradually spread, and the rock should be isolated from the rest of the rockwork if possible, to make pruning and control easier. From what I've read, blue-legged hermits love this plant.

Edited by grmoore

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Gr, to me it's hard to tell cuz I just don't/ can't see the fine "feathering" that C. verticilata is supposed to have as leaves. But if it is C. verticilata that would be very cool - not something seen often and I would pay to get a live sample of it :).

 

Thanks for the clarification on the use of var - I didn't know that, so I'll keep that in mind. :)

 

I still think it is Caulerpa verticilata based on the plant shape and tiered blades. I also think this is a fairly mature plant based on the length of the stipe which appears to be about an inch.

 

I do, however, agree that the plant will gradually spread, and the rock should be isolated from the rest of the rockwork if possible, to make pruning and control easier. From what I've read, blue-legged hermits love this plant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You guys are amazing with your knowledge about macros! i read this stuff and go "how do these people know all this stuff! hats off to you all

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi Gr, to me it's hard to tell cuz I just don't/ can't see the fine "feathering" that C. verticilata is supposed to have as leaves. But if it is C. verticilata that would be very cool - not something seen often and I would pay to get a live sample of it :).

 

Same here Resonance. I certainly would buy a chunk - it's one of the nicer looking Caulerpa species.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No worries alto. Problem is sometimes in our lives there are periods where we get extremely busy and things such as hobbies get neglected. And if such a thing happen in a tank with aggressive macros that's when it's a real problem.

 

There's actually a macro algae reefer in B.C. Canada who kept a carpet of C. racemosa var. peltata in her tank. It actually looked really nice and she kept it that way by trimming it about once a week or so to control. Then her life/ work situation changed and it got busy for a bit. By the time she found some time to actually look at her tank, it had taken over and choked/ killed off most of her other macros and a few corals.

 

That's why I expressed some concern as this was just posted on an Canadian forum and it was fresh on my mind.

 

Sorry if it seems like I'm trying to start a fight. It's difficult to convey tone over the internet. You may very well be right, but I'm talking from experience in having C. racemosa var. peltata popping up in my reef tank. I know exactly what it looks like in it's juvenile and adult forms and the blades are very different than the OP's macro. You are right that it grows fast, but it doesn't grow nearly as fast as you are implying. Even with a slightly elevated phosphate level, as long as I rip mine out once a month, it never leaves the small rock it's on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, hopefully Kat has the space to keep it in an isolation station in her tank for a few weeks. If it is C. verticilata - ChA-cHiNg! $$$ you got at least 2 customers lined up for it already Kat! :lol:B)

 

Same here Resonance. I certainly would buy a chunk - it's one of the nicer looking Caulerpa species.
Edited by RESONANCE

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

when that stuff went sexual on me it was insane! i could barely see 3 inches into the tank. It looked like it was smoking/steaming. crazy stuff... keep an eye out if it starts turning like white in any fashion. i noticed that it was a little less green and the next morning BAM!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now