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Silly question, can you "RE-activate carbon"?


tinctorus

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I was thinking today about whether or not it was possible to "re-activate" carbon once it has been used for say a month or two??

I think I know that answer BUT I figured I would ask on here anyways since there is alot of guys that have been on the hobby long enough to have either heard of someone attempting this before or have possibly done it themselves

 

Any help on this question would be GREATLY appreciated...

 

I know some resins can be "recharged" by either putting them in the oven, as well as some resins that can be recharged by soaking them in a chemical mixture of bleach

 

Thank you guy's AND gal's in advance

 

Mike G

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No but I have heard that the old expired carbon is good for use in gardens. All of the nitrates and phosphates that have binded to the carbon can leach out into the soil.

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I was thinking today about whether or not it was possible to "re-activate" carbon once it has been used for say a month or two??

I think I know that answer BUT I figured I would ask on here anyways since there is alot of guys that have been on the hobby long enough to have either heard of someone attempting this before or have possibly done it themselves

 

Any help on this question would be GREATLY appreciated...

 

I know some resins can be "recharged" by either putting them in the oven, as well as some resins that can be recharged by soaking them in a chemical mixture of bleach

 

Thank you guy's AND gal's in advance

 

Mike G

 

there is no "re" activating carbon, once it's full of chemicals and otherwise, it's full and cannot be reused.

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I doubt you personally can re-activate it, but recycling carbon is common in industry. I use it at work for our wastewater pre-treatment system and for vapor control and we ship it out to a recycler.

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I doubt you personally can re-activate it, but recycling carbon is common in industry. I use it at work for our wastewater pre-treatment system and for vapor control and we ship it out to a recycler.

So what about it I wanted to use the old carbon "once it was dried out of course" to use as sort of a "air filter" for the vent on a protein skimmer, Would it work well for something like that?

 

I dont necesarilly want to "reactivate" it for use back in the aquarium but moreso making it semi useful for other applications for the tank

 

No but I have heard that the old expired carbon is good for use in gardens. All of the nitrates and phosphates that have binded to the carbon can leach out into the soil.

Hmm thats actually a good idea to use in the orchids that I grow as it may help them flourish even better and bloom a bit longer/brighter

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So what about it I wanted to use the old carbon "once it was dried out of course" to use as sort of a "air filter" for the vent on a protein skimmer, Would it work well for something like that?

 

I dont necesarilly want to "reactivate" it for use back in the aquarium but moreso making it semi useful for other applications for the tank

 

 

Hmm thats actually a good idea to use in the orchids that I grow as it may help them flourish even better and bloom a bit longer/brighter

 

 

As i said before once the carbon is loaded up, it's full, meaning it will do nothing more and absorb nothing more, air or water you could put it over the vent once dried, but it won't do anything. you may have to face it, once it's done it's done sorry :happy:

 

 

 

not really sure if this would do your plants any good, im of the understanding that once carbon sucks up a chemical or nutrient it does not release it again, this is why they use carbon to pump the stomachs of poisoning victims. I would just toss it.

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Carbon can be reactivated and is done on a large scale every day but it is not feasable at the hobbyist level. It takes tremendous pressure, 800 degree C. steam and hazardous chemicals to do so.

 

This question was asked on many forums over the last couple days and it has been answered several times.

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Carbon can be reactivated and is done on a large scale every day but it is not feasable at the hobbyist level. It takes tremendous pressure, 800 degree C. steam and hazardous chemicals to do so.

 

This.

 

It's possble, but not economical on a hobby level..

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Oh well its all good info to know, I guess I wont use it for the plants either LOL, I will just buy the cheapest carbon I can find to use for the exhaust of the skimmer since I obviously dont need to use something high grade for sucking up skimmer funk fumes

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