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Tank bounced back quickly from power outage


faub63

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I found this to be pretty amazing, so I figured I'd share it.

 

The electricity went out in my neighborhood early Wednesday evening due to snow and subsequent tree limbs falling on powerlines. During this time, my apartment had no heat, and the ambient temperature dropped pretty rapidly, all the way down to about 51. Needless to say, my pico didn't stand a chance (temperature wise). I tried my best to try to maintain a suitable temperature by heating some tank water on the gas stove, but between work and sleep, I was fighting a losing battle. Even wrapped in blankets, the tank temp was dropping fast. When I woke up this morning and saw the tank temp was 58, I figured my clown, frogspawn, duncan, zoas, shrooms, and a few other corals were goners. I had a battery powered airpump running for a majority of the time the power was off to give some circulation and oxygenate the tank, but thought the temperature flux was too much to overcome. The power finally came back on this afternoon (almost 48hrs later), and to my surprise, the clown was as hungry as ever, my zoas had already opened fully, and my duncan and frogspan were slowly spreading out, fully colored. I am truly amazed that these animals can rebound so quickly form such sub-optimal conditions.

 

Has anyone else had a similar experience, or have any suggestions on what I can do differently when this inevitably happens again? Thanks.

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Yes happened to me once.I used water I heated on the stove.I put it in freezer bags and floated bags of hot water to keep my tank temp stable.I used a cup to keep water circulating hand pouring.

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Yes happened to me once.I used water I heated on the stove.I put it in freezer bags and floated bags of hot water to keep my tank temp stable.I used a cup to keep water circulating hand pouring.

Oh man that would suck....I have a generator.

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...I have a generator.

 

+1

 

I live in a rural area and a generator is pretty much a must-have in this hobby when the power can be out for days at a time during the stormy seasons.

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I found this to be pretty amazing, so I figured I'd share it.

 

The electricity went out in my neighborhood early Wednesday evening due to snow and subsequent tree limbs falling on powerlines. During this time, my apartment had no heat, and the ambient temperature dropped pretty rapidly, all the way down to about 51. Needless to say, my pico didn't stand a chance (temperature wise). I tried my best to try to maintain a suitable temperature by heating some tank water on the gas stove, but between work and sleep, I was fighting a losing battle. Even wrapped in blankets, the tank temp was dropping fast. When I woke up this morning and saw the tank temp was 58, I figured my clown, frogspawn, duncan, zoas, shrooms, and a few other corals were goners. I had a battery powered airpump running for a majority of the time the power was off to give some circulation and oxygenate the tank, but thought the temperature flux was too much to overcome. The power finally came back on this afternoon (almost 48hrs later), and to my surprise, the clown was as hungry as ever, my zoas had already opened fully, and my duncan and frogspan were slowly spreading out, fully colored. I am truly amazed that these animals can rebound so quickly form such sub-optimal conditions.

 

 

In an apartment your options are limited. Since you have a gas stove you could keep all the burners lit and run that to keep temps up.I've done that in the past and a gas stove can put out a surprising amount of heat with all the burners fired up full bore.You wouldn't want to leave them lit when you leave for work though....sounds dangerous.The battery powered air pump is probably what saved your tank.Since I live in a house I have a generator, which I doubt if you could use, a power inverter and UPS battery back up which can run my return pump for hours.A heater would drain one of those pretty fast though.

Can't think of much as else you can do in an apartment...maybe other apartment dwellers may have other ideas.

 

Has anyone else had a similar experience, or have any suggestions on what I can do differently when this inevitably happens again? Thanks.

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