bitts

The Marine Planted Tank & Macro Algae Thread

311 posts in this topic

The Marine Planted Tank & Macro Algae Thread.

 

 

this thread is intended as both a refrence giude to those looking for information on planted marine tanks, display based refugiums, or simply the use of specific types of macro algae. and as a place to exchange ideas on how to best utilize macro algae in a marine tank. other topics open for debate are refugium methodology & design within the above guide lines. availability & procurment of heathy specimens.

 

2_26.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lighting

The major factor in differentiation of the macro algaes is the color. Caused by the amount & type of chlorophyll present. This is then influenced by accessory pigments. This combination present determines. Not only the color, but the ability to survive & compete with other fauna at a given depth. As depth increases, the amount & type of light becomes increasingly diminished. With wavelengths at the blue end of the spectrum being the one's to penetrate the deepest. With the algae responding by shifting to either a red or brown form.

 

electrospectruminwater.jpg

 

spectrum.jpg

 

Types of Chlorophyll

(well this is where the guy that was naming them proves to have no imagination, at least they had fun naming the quarks.)

 

They brake down as chlorophyll A, B, C D & F.

Chlorofilab.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chlorophyll

 

Accessory Pigments

Such as phycoerythrin are not as efficient in photosynthesis as chlorophyll. But in lower orders may be the only light capturing protein present (Bactria). While in higher orders, they extend the range of wavelengths over which light can drive photosynthesis (our macro's).

 

pigment.jpg

 

The differentiation in red from green or brown macros, would be the presence of chlorophyll's A, C & D. Also of note is that only marine based red algae & bacteria possess chlorophyll d. where as green algae possess chlorophyll's A & B. Of the three types of algae in relation to our tanks red macros are actually the most plentiful.

 

By now you either geeking out with me or wondering what the hell this has to do with our tanks. One of the most often asked ? so far is what type of bulb should i be using . Hopefully by understanding the algae & how it is colored. lighting it will become easier.

 

 

Calvin Cycle

calvin_cycle.jpg

 

 

 

Assimilation of Nitrogen & Ammonium

One thing to consider is the uptake of ammonium by the micro or macro algae & how this will affect the cycles within the system over all. Especially when added early in the systems development. A large benefit of having macros comes from this uptake. Reducing the bioload that must be supported by the nitrifying bacteria. This does not mean the macro's will not use nitrates just that they can prefer to utilize the ammonium first. With the uptake rate depending on type, & so in answer to the original question of how the macro will effect the cycles. Their presence will result in lowering the load on the bacterial population in the beginning of a cycle. Thus it will allow for the bacteria to have time to full populate the available media. While reducing the size of the cycle. When the macros are added early in the systems development. Then when the system has had time to fully develop the presences of macros will allow for that much more of a bioload to be supported. The most important thing to understand about the assimilation of nitrogen in both forms is that it is the dominate force in the nitrogen cycle & that ammonium is proffered due to its assimilation needing less energy.

 

 

 

 

 

members tanks

 

P1010009-43.jpg

 

P1010028-26.jpg

got2envy's 40g

 

IMG_2058.jpg

icy's seahorse & macro tank & pt II

 

SimpleWonders1-17-2010009.jpg

needreefunds

 

 

 

 

fts5.jpg

SbCaes

 

 

 

To all who have found this thread or the sand bed thread to have been use full. Feel free to utilize it on other boards as needed. Make sure to link back to this thread & add a link to the boards it is now posted on. Feel free to cut & past as you see fit. I would add that in return. Any useful knowledge from said boards kindly be added back to this thread. I believe that macro tanks as a sub genre of the hobby are still in there infancy. Therefore any gain in knowledge needs to be shared & disseminated as quickly as possible. I can only give permission for my posts though. Please PM individual board members to use their knowledge.

Edited by bitts
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types

 

 

macro algae

 

915newmacro4.jpg

stunning but i dont know the name. photo is from organism post in the trade thread.

 

ryan28003.jpg

botryoladia (red grape cauerpa)

 

chaetomorpha (cheato, use this instead of caulerpa)

 

caulerpa (plage inducing nastyness, may be baned in your area)

 

Chlorodesmis (aka turtleweed or maiden's hair)

 

redbushgood.jpg

Dictyota (red)

 

gracillaria.jpg

gracilaria

 

gelidium (red kelp or red hair)

 

new5008.jpg

halimeda (cactus, baby's bows, money plant. changes color at night)

 

789440429_EZRmg-M.jpg

Halymenia sp. (aka Dragon's Breath, Flame)

 

neomeris (fuzzy tip)

 

nemastoma.jpg

nemastoma

 

nitophyllum (red dictyota)

 

bluealgecolonymacro1221.jpg

ochtodes

 

penicillus dumentosus (neptune's shaving brush)

 

udotea (mermaid's tea cup or fan algae)

 

ulva (sea lettuce)

 

 

grasses

 

zostera (eel grass)

 

syringodium (manatee grass)

 

thalassia (turtle grass)

 

halophila (paddle weed or midrib grass)

 

Halodule

 

 

 

 

as to caulerpa

 

I <3 Caulerpas and I think they have been given a bad rep. they are some of the more beautiful algaes and easy to take care of...also easy to prune and control. Racemosa and Taxilfolia can be a PITA but if u have a tank that is just for macros why worry...I however would not add it to a reef as it would easily eventually overgrow and block the light and choke corals out.

Prolifera is very easy to control.

 

JMO

 

:)

 

 

 

from weets :)

 

 

 

IMG_5195.jpg

 

A type of Chaetomorpha. Forms low, dense mats on rock and makes an excellent mini habitat for different types of microfauna. Reminds me of Putting Green!

 

 

 

 

IMG_5197.jpg

 

Cryptonemia Crenulata

 

 

IMG_5201.jpg

Flamingo Feather Algae

 

 

 

IMG_5208.jpg

Green Macro is Ulva, Blue Macro is Blue Ochtodes, still working on ID for pink one.

 

IMG_5198.jpg

Bryothamnion Triquetrum

 

 

from got2envy :)

 

red feather...I dunno know the scientific name..sowwy

P1010003-52.jpg

 

botryoladia (red grape cauerpa)

P1010006-48.jpg

 

Bryothamnion Triquetrum...I think

P1010007-44.jpg

 

Ulva

P1010008-42.jpg

 

got this purple macro from NR member Bird...looks alot like Ochtodes

P1010013-33.jpg

 

Caulerpa Prolifera

P1010019-24.jpg

 

Taitan macro

P1010020-24.jpg

 

red spot macro from organism

P1010021-19.jpg

 

flame algae or dragons breath algae

P1010022-22.jpg

 

I dunno what this is...got it from LAreefs

P1010029-17.jpg

Caulerpa Racemosa (green grape)

P1010016-31.jpg

P1010002-60.jpg

 

short codium

P1010012-31.jpg

 

Caulerpa Taxilfolia (feather algae)

P1010012-30.jpg

 

organisms blue scroll

P1010009-39.jpg

P1010003-47.jpg

P1010014-34.jpg

 

organisms red spot

P1010002-52.jpg

 

will get more :)

Edited by bitts

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Livestock of Marine Planted Tanks(Finished product coming soon)

 

 

Common fish in Marine Planted Tanks

 

Seahorses- Seahorses are very common in marine planted tanks. The algae gives them food to eat.

swfthree.jpg

(Seahorsedreams)

IMG_1334.jpg

(D3monic)

 

Pipefish- Many pipefish are very well suited for marine planted tanks for the same reasons as seahorses.

IMG_1359.jpg

(D3monic)

IMG_1293.jpg

(D3monic)

IMG_1301.jpg

(D3monic)

 

Pipehorse- Not very common but some are in the aquarium trade.

 

Blennies-

Notes

newb question. are all blennys herbivores? and will destroy a macro tank?
They do need greens in their diet, or they'll lose their bright coloration.
I have a tailspot blenny in the tank with the macros I got from you and got2envy. He has shown absolutely no interest in munching on them.
Hey how ya doin? :)

 

some macros are just not very appetizing to some omnivores...most blennies would rather pick at LPS lol

and if they are well fed most won't try and eat algae...except mabe a lawnmower blenny, they love GHA and bryopsis

I had a bi color blenny that loved to nip my fungia plate <_<

 

It all depends on the blenny. Some will decimate a macro tank or some will do great in one.

 

Gobies- Gobies are very well suited to Marine Planted tanks.

 

My thoughts on the genus Amblygobius- This genus of gobies are very, very hard to care for. They usually perish soon after you put them into your reef tank. However in a marine planted tank, they do a lot better. They need lots and lots of pods to stay alive because it's very hard to get them to eat prepared foods. If you are interested in getting a goby of the genus Amblygobius, I recommend adding John's Reef Pods from Reef Cleaners. Get a few of these pouches and put them in your refugium or display tank at night so they can hopefully breed and form large colonies. This will help your Amblygobius sp. do well. The genus Amblygobius includes gobies like the Hector's Goby, the Raisnford's Goby, and the Orangemarked Goby.

 

787102705_6eJVW-L-2.jpg

(Dhaut)

saltwaterpics3012.jpg

(animalmaster6 "The Best"

:lol:)

 

Filefish- many species of juvenile filefish take shelter in macro algaes. Other filefish spend their entire lives in them. They are very well suited to marine Planted Tanks.

P1010108-1.jpg

(Got2Envy)

IMG_7537-1.jpg

(Pookstreet)

 

Eels- Many species of eels are found in Marine Planted tanks. Some include Snowflake Eels, snake eels, and garden eels.

4514471053_cbf1577494.jpg

(Zook)

 

 

Anthias- Various anthias can be found in Marine Planted tanks.

 

Anglers and Frogfish- Anglers and frogfish are very common in Marine Planted tanks. Many species blend in to various macro algaes.

PICT2091.jpg

(Weeber)

 

Jawfish- Jawfish are found in Marine Planted tanks with Deep Sandbeds.

 

Scorpionfish, Lionfish, Waspfish, Etc.- These scorpionfishes are very common in Marine Planted Tanks. They usually blend in with various macros.

esch700.jpg

(Seahorsedreams)

 

Notes

newb question. are all blennys herbivores? and will destroy a macro tank?
They do need greens in their diet, or they'll lose their bright coloration.
I have a tailspot blenny in the tank with the macros I got from you and got2envy. He has shown absolutely no interest in munching on them.
Hey how ya doin? :)

 

some macros are just not very appetizing to some omnivores...most blennies would rather pick at LPS lol

and if they are well fed most won't try and eat algae...except mabe a lawnmower blenny, they love GHA and bryopsis

I had a bi color blenny that loved to nip my fungia plate <_<

 

 

 

*Animalmaster6*

Edited by animalmaster6

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Halymenia sp. (aka Dragon's Breath, Flame)

 

789440429_EZRmg-M.jpg

 

Medium light, very high flow.

Edited by DHaut

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you forgot probably the best normal-form seagrass for nano reefs, Halodule spp.

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there was a member by the username of basille that was on here that was starting a list much like yours. very nice guy, I am sure you would be able to get him to agree to use the pictures and the info he had in his thread. Would make for a good combination, I think at last count he had 150 something species...it was pages long...

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omgomgomg

 

I will try and get some better pix of my algaes to add :)

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Added a livestock list under the 1st post.

I will definetly add pictures and many more livestock.

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He hee Subcribed to this :ninja:

Edited by TheBlueLorax

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Very cool thread bitts, well done! Sticky worthy IMO.

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nice addition animalmaster6.

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are the pdf's usefull, or should they not be added?

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nice addition animalmaster6.

Thanks Bitts.

I plan on adding Inverts and a lot more pics and information of fish.

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one of the best examples that i know of.

090624FTS.jpg

 

34gFulltankshotwithstand.jpg

 

im sorry i cant remeber whos it is though.

 

 

edit

found the thread.

http://forum.marinedepot.com/Topic91680-4-1.aspx#bm91708

http://reefcentral.com/forums/showthread.p...ight=pledosophy

Edited by bitts

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What is the deal with the alleopathy argument? :) It just seems to keep popping up. Okay so it does exist to some extent, but multiple types of algae are easily grown together, and alleopathy has no noticeable effects in an aquarium. My holding tanks are covered from head to toe with over 35 species of macro, and they have no problems. there are also a ton of tanks out there now with many different species of algae living together. The ocean is like this too. Sure they will compete for food and space, but you want them to compete for food and you control the space so why worry about it?

 

Additionally the chemicals in algae that are fish deterrents only make them taste bad to fish. They do not harm fish or corals. They are not toxins, they will not harm livestock.

 

Certainly corals are worse at this than macro algae. I am sure you can find one example of a tank with different kinds of coral in it on this website. No rule saying your refugium has to be boring. You can spice it up, and it will still filter.

 

Here is my philosophy on macro algae for refugiums:

 

You want both consistent nutrient uptake and pulse nutrient uptake:

 

Here is what I mean by those terms: (They use similar terminology in phycology by the idea is exactly the same)

 

Consistent Macros- Macro that need nutrient at a high level, all the time. They filter out nutrients quickly and are effective at dealing with established nutrient problems.

 

Pulse Macros - Can handle periods of low nutrient levels well, and are long lived plants

 

Pulse, grows quickly with consistent - somewhere in the middle, a spectrum below would have worked better but I am lazy.

 

Red Mangroves - pulse, grows quickly with consistent

Black Mangrove - pulse, grows quickly with consistent

Botryocladia (Red Grape) - pulse, grows quickly with consistent

Cactus Caulerpa - consistent

Caulerpa Mexicana - consistent

Caulerpa Prolifera - consistent

Chaeto - consistent

Christmas Tree - pulse, grows quickly with consistent

Codium - pulse

Dictyota ciliolata - consistent

Fauchea - pulse

Fern Caulerpa - consistent

Fire Fern - pulse

Flame Algae - pulse

Grape Caulerpa - consistent

Green Gracilaria - pulse, grows quickly with consistent

Halimeda (Monile) - pulse, grows quickly with consistent

Halimeda scabra (Money Plant) - pulse, grows quickly with consistent

Halymenia - pulse, grows quickly with consistent

Halymenia duchassaignii - pulse, grows quickly with consistent

Laurencia - pulse

Liagora - pulse

Manatee Grass - consistent

Mermaid's Wine Glass - pulse, grows quickly with consistent

Mermaid's Fan - pulse

Mermaid's Shot Glass - pulse, grows quickly with consistent

Oar Grass - pulse, grows quickly with consistent

Pencil Cap - pulse, grows quickly with consistent

Pink Galaxy - pulse

Red Gracilaria - pulse, grows quickly with consistent

Red Titan Algae - pulse

Sargassum - pulse

Saw Blade Caulerpa - consistent

Scroll Algae - pulse, grows quickly with consistent

Shaving Brush - pulse, grows quickly with consistent

Spatula Algae - pulse

Spider Algae - consistent

Suction Cup Caulerpa - consistent

Ulva - pulse, grows quickly with consistent

 

The most ideal refugiums offer a combination of all 3. The slower filtering algae is there for when your tank stops producing such high nutrient levels. Because they all compete for space, proper trimming of the consistent macros keeps them in check while the slower growers hedge your bet so to speak in case the faster growers die b/c of lack of nutrients. There is a long article about this at chuck's addiction that explains the idea better. It is here:

 

http://www.chucksaddiction.com/algae.html

 

On a side note: what is the deal with "Red Kelp" - Kelp is a cold water brown macro algae that grows to 80 feet or so. Fauchea, the family of algae usually sold under this name, top out at around 12 inches usually and are red. Anyway, thought I would add that .02 as well. Hopefully it will stick. My LFS sells all algae as "kelp", Caulerpa, chaeto etc... they are all kelp to her. :)

 

 

it would seem that i need to add some algae to the list.

 

 

 

 

 

 

fromjakesaw's besides microalgae what can go in a refugium thread.

http://www.nano-reef.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=170029

Edited by bitts

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Great post! How come there are no caulerpas listed?

 

I've always really enjoyed macro algae. When I was younger I always had seahorse tanks and they were always planted. I'm in the process of building a 40 Breeder and I am definitely going to have a bunch of macros in the 'fuge- but its not going to be on display :/

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favorite thread of all time. (next to johns forum of course)

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Awesome thread. I plan on having more macros once I upgrade my 3g to the 15g that is sitting in the floor atm.

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Display Refugiums

 

 

while many of use have a fuge in the sump. most of us have over looked the potental of this space. considering the limited system volume in our nano's it only makes sence to utilize this area to its fullest and inrich our display thur a display fuge.

 

 

in simplest trems a refugium is an area to shelter or add protection, for spesific livestock, within the system.

within this premise are several posable benefits to system as a hole. that can still be achived while adding an atractve element to the setup. some of these benefits include micro organisim production, the culturing of and havesting of macro algee for nutrint export and or fresh vegetables for herbivore's, an area which can be biotopic for specific and specialized livestock. most importantly. realize that there is an almost infinite number of ways and purpose's for which to setup your fuge. be it for food culture, nutrient export, plankton generation (both zoo & phyto), nitrate reduction via a dsb (see sand bed info below), pick those most important to your needs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

examples

 

 

i did find these after hunting

 

 

greg6wt.jpg

 

 

greg42dt.jpg

 

 

gregsump18ws.jpg

 

 

 

 

gregsump27wo.jpg

 

 

 

and from a thread i think on nr but ive had them a while. a standered false wall display fuge. the best part is its for a pico. found the thread hope you enjoy the link, its also one of the best biuld threads ive seen.

 

Image142-1.jpg

 

 

1046.jpg

Edited by bitts

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you forgot probably the best normal-form seagrass for nano reefs, Halodule spp.

 

added. thanks.

 

there was a member by the username of basille that was on here that was starting a list much like yours. very nice guy, I am sure you would be able to get him to agree to use the pictures and the info he had in his thread. Would make for a good combination, I think at last count he had 150 something species...it was pages long...

 

hope i found some of what you you were pointing me towards. if not lmk.

 

omgomgomg

 

I will try and get some better pix of my algaes to add :)

 

i'll add them as soon as you have them. your pics are always great.

 

 

Great post! How come there are no caulerpas listed?

 

I've always really enjoyed macro algae. When I was younger I always had seahorse tanks and they were always planted. I'm in the process of building a 40 Breeder and I am definitely going to have a bunch of macros in the 'fuge- but its not going to be on display :/

 

the reason for this is that the only info i have on caulerpa is that its extreamly evil & can be a rather vile little bugger that will nuke the tank just as soon as be usefull. simply because some things in life just want to watch the would burn. think heath ledger as the joker.

 

well really its i just dont have any good info about it, and figured i'd wait for some one to post something usefull about it.

 

favorite thread of all time. (next to johns forum of course)

 

thanks. wondering if you have a linky to his forum, if its not already linked.

 

 

Halymenia sp. (aka Dragon's Breath, Flame)

 

789440429_EZRmg-M.jpg

 

Medium light, very high flow.

 

 

hey d thanks for the additions.

Edited by bitts

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I <3 Caulerpas and I think they have been given a bad rep. they are some of the more beautiful algaes and easy to take care of...also easy to prune and control. Racemosa and Taxilfolia can be a PITA but if u have a tank that is just for macros why worry...I however would not add it to a reef as it would easily eventually overgrow and block the light and choke corals out.

Prolifera is very easy to control.

 

JMO

 

:)

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I should finish the Fish part of the livestock guide by tomorrow.

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I should finish the Fish part of the livestock guide by tomorrow.

 

you are one of my heros.

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