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phytoplankton ?


august213

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I'm pretty sure that the phytoplankton are dead, but the bottle says to keep it from touching the water to prevent the phytoplankton from decomposing. This is just my thought, and i have not done much research on it.

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Yeah, that stuff is dead. Most lfs will lie to you in order to get you to buy something, best thing to do is avoid those and reward the honest ones with your business...

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Florida Aqua Farms sends it out in little petri dishes ready to grow, they also sell everything you need to aquaculture phyto and rotifers. Just be warned it will continue to bloom in most tanks. Or atleast all mine

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The easiest way is to find local breeders or colleges growing them and get it from them. You can order cultures online, just google "live phyto cultures" or something of that nature.

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You're probably much better off going with a live culture from a lab or supply house than with say live dt's phyto or something along those lines that's relatively diluted and possibly contaminated already.

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There's a reputable supplier on eBay with which I've had success. I've only cultured nannochloropsis thus far. Some of the eBay vendors offer a mix of 6 species that range in size from 2 microns to 400 microns. This would do well in being a more complete suspension feeding for various filter feeding organisms and planktivorous fish alike. When you purchase a starter culture, you also need a fertilizer (a sterile, "lab-quality" fertilizer should pop up in the search). Just remember, live phyto supplementation is more beneficial for pod and other microfauna population than filter-feeding invertebrates. Most organisms in home aquaria have been acclimated to secure almost all energy from zooxanthellae starch metabolism.

 

A starter culture, saltwater mixed to 1.019 SG, sterile fertilizer, shop light with a 6500K CF bulb, small air pump, and some airline tubing should get you headed in the right direction. Make sure to harvest your phyto often as too high a concentration can starve some of the organisms of photosynthetic light. This can make your entire culture crash. You can store harvested cultures in the fridge, just make sure to give it a good turn every day for agitation. This stored culture should last at least a week. Feed moderate amounts no more than 3 times per week depending on your bioload. Turn off your skimmer for an hour after feeding to allow the phyto to stay in the water column. If you notice a phytoplankton bloom, cut the feeding amount in half or switch to twice a week. I like to feed at night as I feel polyp extension on my SPS allows for more capture and feeding although I've yet to find research supporting this theory.

 

If this sounds daunting, I've noticed a good feeding reponse from Coral Frenzy, a freeze-spray dried mix of various filter foods. Hope that helps!

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  • 4 weeks later...

DT is not contamined or diluted by any mean, it's just that it contains too many type of phyto that will compete with each other. Some people have had sucess with it although eventualy one type of phyto will take over and that's what you'll end up with so the variety is less but it still can work but has more risk of crashing.

 

I would go with the farm that sell the phyto pellets.

 

You're probably much better off going with a live culture from a lab or supply house than with say live dt's phyto or something along those lines that's relatively diluted and possibly contaminated already.
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