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Acropora's Fish Guide

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AcroporaLokani

AcroporaLokani’s Guide To Fish

 

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Feeding Your Fish

All fish must be fed what they would eat in the ocean (Or at least something close to it) so do your research on what your fish eats.

 

If you plan to keep a fish you must feed him/her every day, some people will suggest feeding your fish every other day or every three days (I have ever heard of some people preaching that you should only feed your fish once a week!) but this is not in your fishes best interest, most fish need to be fed once, twice or even three times a day without exception. If you are trying to keep your ammonia, nitrite and nitrate levels down and are thinking of not feeding your fish daily then you should think about this, Fish are small and have little body fat and need to be fed in order to keep this body fat, without daily feedings your fishes fat reserve will dwindle down to nothing and your fish will starve to death (I should mention that some sharks, eels and stingrays only need to be fed a few times a week due to a slower digestive rate, but for most common fish they have an even faster digestive rate than humans). After all do you eat every day? If your ammonia, nitrite and nitrate levels are high then you have to many fish, your fish are/is too big, you are over feeding or you are not doing water changes frequently enough or the water changes need to be larger (I should mention I am not saying to throw handfuls of food in to your tank but to just add what your fish will eat in two or three minutes time without any going to waste). If you cannot get your levels under control then you should ether look in to a better filter/protein skimmer, a bigger tank, taking some fish back to the pet store or doing more/larger water changes rather than trying to starve the fish that you took the commitment to care for (Would you stop feeding your dog or cat simply because there is poop in the yard? No, no you would not.)

 

Omnivore: An omnivorous fish will eat both plant and animal matter (Fish, shrimp, various invertebrates, algae and seaweeds). If your fish is omnivorous then they require both meaty foods and plant based food in order to survive, live and thrive in your tank. Specific foods, dried algae, dried seaweeds, frozen mysis shrimp, frozen brine shrimp (Not as a regular diet), scallops, squid, live brine shrimp and for larger omnivores frozen krill.

Carnivore: A carnivorous fish will only eat animal based foods and that is all they need to thrive in your aquarium. Animal based food include any form of shrimp, fish or bivalve (In some cases this includes coral as well). Specific foods, live clams (The ones you find at your grocery store) you can put them in on the half shell, frozen krill (For larger carnivores), frozen mysis shrimp, frozen brine shrimp (Not as a stable diet), scallop, cut fish meat small enough to fit in your fishes mouth and live brine shrimp.

 

Herbivore A herbivorous fish eats solely plant based foods and will require dried seaweed and possibly live kalerpa to round out your fishes diet. When feeding dried seaweed I would recommend feeding your herbivorous fish red, green and purple varieties. Specific foods, dried green seaweed, dried purple seaweed, dried brown seaweed, spirulina (Comes in flake food or frozen), and you can also feed different species of caulerpa.

 

Choosing The Food To Feed Your Fish

 

I would not recommend feeding your fish flake foods simply because they are not as nutritious as frozen or live foods. Feeding frozen, live or flake is commonly disputed but in the end frozen is better than flake and live is better than frozen.

 

The reason frozen foods are not as nutritious as live is because when frozen the ice crystals puncture the food releasing some of the liquid, this liquid takes away some of the nutrients and vitamins. Basically you can look at it like this, when you freeze fruit juice comes out of it, this juice takes away from the fruit making it less nutritious for you, the same principals go for frozen fish food. If you want to feed flake foods I would recommend a mix of frozen and flake foods.

 

 

Tank Bred Fish

 

Tank bred fish are very popular within the aquarium hobby for good reason, they are not taken from the ocean, they are already trained to eat flake and frozen food and they acclimate better to aquarium life. Many fish are commonly tank bred and most people suggest getting a tank bred fish over a wild fish even if the fish is a few dollars more. Tank bred fish usually are more disease resistant because the stress of aquarium life will not alter their immune system due to stress.

 

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One thing you will want to look in to is if the aquaculture facility your fish comes from is reputable. Some aquaculture facilities treat the fish horribly and they are kept in conditions that will make the fish a poor choice for you tank simply because it will be sickly (Not all are like this some aquaculture fish breeders treat their fish very well and produce healthy and hearty fish that will be with you for years).

 

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Something you will also want to look in to is if the aquaculture facility practices culling (Culling is where the breeder kills the baby fish or the parent fish if they are say smaller in size or if the parents egg/sperm count is low). Culling is something that is commonly practiced with breeders. The ethics of culling is commonly disputed and usually is compared to survival of the fittest and the food chain but in my mind if you make the decision to breed a fish in an aquarium the predatory food chain is taken out of the equation just like if you choose to buy a fish you would never kill it simply because death may occur in nature.

 

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I want to make it clear, I am in no way saying tank bred fish are bad (I think breeding saltwater fish is a very good idea and given the option of a fish from the ocean or one from a breeder I would go for the tank bred fish, and eventually I hope the saltwater hobby is as self sufficient as the freshwater hobby), I am simply saying you should check in to the aquaculture facility your fish come from. Some aquaculture facilities treat their fish (Both breeding parents and offspring) exceptionally well and the end product is a well bred and hearty fish that was not taken from the ocean and thus not stolen from its natural home and a better choice than a wild fish. Another reason I recommend looking up the aquaculture facility is that you can make sure the fish is actually tank bred (Some fish stores will simply say a fish is tank bred and double the price of the fish and the buyer is fooled, but most fish store workers will not be smart enough to have a back story on their "tank bred" fish).

 

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*NOTE* I am in no way saying these aquaculture facilities pictured are bad or have flawed moral compasses or a flawed sense of ethics, I am simply using the images to show aquaculture facilities and the fish they produce. The fish pictured look healthy to me and that is why I have chosen these pictures.

 

 

Dwarf Angelfish

 

Coral Beauty Angelfish (Centropyge bispinosus)

A very hearty fish and a good fish for a newer aquarium keeper with basic knowledge of fish, these fish are purple, blue, orange and the belly and fins are yellow with some individuals having only yellow fins and orange bellies. They are omnivorous and feed on both algae and animal based foods so be sure to provide a good mix of the two (A few fish food companies make food specifically for angelfish and this is a good choice when keeping one of any species). At least a forty gallon aquarium is necessary since this fish reached four inches in length and will be too large for smaller tanks. These do not get along with fish of its own species. These fish do not do very well in reef tanks (It can be done however, if keeping this fish in a reef tank make sure to feed it two to three times daily so when it gets hungry it does not turn to your corals). Specific foods, dried algae, dried seaweeds, frozen mysis shrimp, frozen brine shrimp (Not as a regular diet), scallops, squid, live brine shrimp and when larger frozen krill

 

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Bicolor Angelfish (Centropyge bicolor)

A blue and yellow fish that just fits in to the “dwarf angelfish” category is the bicolor angelfish. These fish require at least a fifty gallon tank due to their adult size of six inches. I have seen some reef tanks with this species in them but not many due to the fact that these may just like your corals more than the food they are supposed to eat, I would suggest leaving this angel in a fish only aquarium because they are more prone to eat all the coral you have spend time and money on. When looking at this fish you may be tempted to have more than one but unless you have a massive tank (Over two hundred gallons with an eight foot span) you should just hold off due to the aggression this fish exhibits towards its own species. This is an omnivorous fish and should be fed both meaty and algae based foods, specific foods, dried algae, dried seaweeds, frozen mysis shrimp, frozen brine shrimp (Not as a regular diet), scallops, squid, live brine shrimp and when larger frozen krill

 

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Flame Angelfish (Centropyge loriculus)

 

Flame angelfish are easily the most popular dwarf angelfish because of its beautiful colors of red, blue orange, yellow and black. These fish require at the least thirty gallons but preferably forty to fifty gallons. These fish only reach four inches but are very active and need extra swimming room. They will not get along well with its own species, the fighting may be just nipping here and there but if you plan on keeping a fish why would you want one with tattered fins (Especially a fish as beautiful as this one), so one per tank is a good rule. These fish are omnivorous and require both meat and algae based foods in order to stay healthy. When keeping these fish in reef tanks (I have seen this species in many reef tanks so it is possible) you must keep it fat so it does not think of your corals as food. Specific foods, dried algae, dried seaweeds, frozen mysis shrimp, frozen brine shrimp (Not as a regular diet), scallops, squid, live brine shrimp and when larger frozen krill

 

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Lemon Peel Angelfish (Centropyge flavissimus)

 

Another angelfish that just barely fits in to the “dwarf angelfish” category is the lemon peel angelfish. This is a vibrant fish being solid yellow with blue around its eyes and gills as an adult and yellow and blue with a spot on its side that can be black or brown as a juvenile. This fish needs at least a fifty gallon tank (Do not be tempted to put this fish in a ten gallon when you see a small one inch fish at your LFS they get large for nano tanks and deserve an appropriately sized tank to live in). These are omnivorous and need both algae and animal matter in their diet in order to stay healthy. These are not for beginners but more for a moderately knowledgeable fish keeper. I have only ever seen one of these in a reef tank (Not that there aren’t more reef tanks with this species) but the fish was removed within a few weeks due to it trying to eat a bubble coral (Plerogyra sinuosa), this may have to do with the individual fish or with the feeding schedule of the reefer/amount fed. Specific foods, dried algae, dried seaweeds, frozen mysis shrimp, frozen brine shrimp (Not as a regular diet), scallops, squid, live brine shrimp and when larger frozen krill

 

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Pygmy Cherub Angelfish (Centropyge argi)

 

The pygmy cherub angelfish is a somewhat aggressive fish that is known to fight to the death with its own species if they are kept in the same tank (Some individuals will fight some won’t, but it is good to be on the safe side and stick with only one per tank). This is a nice colored fish, being blue and orange it can give your tank some new colors that you may otherwise not have. This fish has a maximum size of three inches so it is good for smaller tanks (But nothing under ten gallons, preferably an aquarium of twenty or thirty gallons). If you wish to keep this species with corals then you must be aware that it may try to eat them (Some individuals will some won’t it just depends on the fish and how often you feed him/her). This fish is omnivorous and needs both animal and plant matter in its diet (Acceptable foods include, Dried seaweed, Dried algae, Brine shrimp (Not as its main food), mysis shrimp and some companies make frozen angelfish food that contains various shrimp, krill, algae and marine sponge). If you are keeping this fish in a tank with coral you should feed it two to three times a day, in a fish only tank one to two times a day is acceptable. Specific foods, dried algae, dried seaweeds, frozen mysis shrimp, frozen brine shrimp (Not as a regular diet), scallops, squid, live brine shrimp.

 

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Large Angelfish (Not For Nano Tanks)

 

Imperator Angelfish (Pomacanthus imperator)

 

The imperator angelfish is by far the most sought after angelfish (Next to the regal angelfish) due to how beautiful it is when full grown (And as a juvenile). When full grown they have blue and yellow stripes and look like they have a mask over their eyes. When in the juvenile coloration they will be dark blue with baby blue and white stripes and patterns. These fish grow to an impressive one foot to one foot six inches depending on the gender of the fish and simply on the genes of the fish. I would not recommend keeping these fish in reef tanks because in the wild they eat coral as part of their diet, it is possible to keep them with coral but if you plan on doing so make sure you have an appropriately sized fish only aquarium or are ready to take your fish back to the pet store if things don’t work as planned. Because of the large size of these fish I would say the adult imperator angelfish requires at least a one hundred and fifty gallon aquarium with at least a six foot span. They are omnivorous and require both animal and plant matter in order to thrive. Specific foods, dried algae, dried seaweeds, frozen mysis shrimp, frozen brine shrimp (Not as a regular diet), scallops, squid, live brine shrimp and when larger frozen krill.

 

 

Juvenile

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Adult

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Regal Angelfish (Pygoplites diacanthus)

 

The regal angelfish is both beautiful and delicate due to its feeding habits (Some individuals will not eat). The colors of this fish are blue, yellow, white and black. These fish as I previously stated may not eat, a good way to make sure that this fish will eat is insisting on your fish store feeding the fish before you buy it (If they refuse or say something like “Oh I just fed him, that’s why he isn’t eating” do not buy the fish and wait for one you can see eating). This is an omnivorous species and needs both animal and plant matter to keep its vivid colors and to thrive. The regal angelfish can be nine inches to one foot in length; I would recommend a one hundred and twenty five gallon tank to one hundred and fifty gallon tank for this fish’s adult size. Specific foods, dried algae, dried seaweeds, frozen mysis shrimp, frozen brine shrimp (Not as a regular diet), scallops, squid, live brine shrimp and when larger frozen krill.

 

 

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Swallowtail Angelfish (Genicanthus melanospilus)

 

This fish contradicts the common one angelfish per tank and will not eat corals. These fish in nature are plankton eaters but can become omnivorous in an aquarium, These fish also are natural schooling fish and can be kept in a group (If your aquarium is large enough of course). The swallow tail angelfish grows to be six to ten inches and requires an aquarium that is eighty to one hundred and twenty five gallons in size. Specific foods, dried algae, dried seaweeds, frozen mysis shrimp, frozen brine shrimp (Not as a regular diet), scallops, squid, live brine shrimp and when larger frozen krill.

 

 

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Butterfly Fish

 

Heniochus Butterfly fish (Heniochus acuminatus)

 

Also knows as the false moorish idol the heniochus butterfly fish is black, white and yellow in color. This butterfly fish unlike most others can be kept in pairs or in groups. The heniochus butterfly fish grows to be seven to ten inches and requires at least a one hundred gallon aquarium for one (Larger if you plan to keep a group). These fish are omnivorous and eat both plant and animal matter. These fish are not reef safe and tend to constantly pick at corals especially if they are underfed. Specific foods, dried algae, dried seaweeds, frozen mysis shrimp, frozen brine shrimp (Not as a regular diet), scallops, squid, live brine shrimp and when larger frozen krill.

 

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Copperband Butterfly Fish (Chelmon rostratus)

 

The copperband butterfly fish is orange, white and black, this fish is great when used to kill aiptasia but it may also eat feather dusters and other anemones you may want in your tank. It can be difficult to get this fish to feed because in nature it eats anemones, feather dusters and copapods. This fish is a carnivore and needs only animal based food to survive, if you can get this fish to eat frozen or flake make sure you feed it accordingly. Again a good way to make sure this fish eats is to see it eat in your local fish store. Some people actually breed aiptasia to feed to this fish. If you are planning on keeping the copperband butterfly in a reef you should know that they will eat clams and on occasion corals as well. If you are able to train them to eat these specific foods should be fed, live clams (The ones you find at your grocery store) you can put them in on the half shell, frozen krill, frozen mysis shrimp, frozen brine shrimp (Not as a stable diet), scallop, cut fish meat small enough to fit in your fishes mouth and live brine shrimp.

 

 

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Skeletal structure of copperband butterfly fish

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Cardinalfish

 

Banggai Cardinalfish (Pterapogon kauderni)

 

The banggai cardinalfish is silver, black and white in color and reaches two to three inches in length, These are one of the most if not the most popular cardinalfish in aquariums due to the fact that some are tank bred, they have such beautiful markings and patters, and they are reef safe. These are carnivores and need only animal based food to survive; most animal based frozen foods are suitable. These are great fish for beginners because of how hearty they are and the fact that they do not get very large. These fish commonly breed in aquariums and the male of this species holds the eggs in his mouth until they hatch, then the exact miniature banggai is let out of the fathers mouth. These fish can live within the spines of long spine urchin (Diadema setosum). Specific foods, live clams (The ones you find at your grocery store) you can put them in on the half shell, frozen mysis shrimp, frozen brine shrimp (Not as a stable diet), scallop, cut fish meat small enough to fit in your fishes mouth and live brine shrimp.

 

 

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Spotted Cardinalfish (Sphaeramia nematoptera)

 

The spooted cardinal fish is yellow, black, red and white, this fish has a polka dotted pattern along with a black stripe that separates the fishes body in half. Also known as the pajama cardinal fish these just as the banggai cardinal will live in the long spine urchin (Diadema setosum). These fish prefer to be kept in groups and do poorly without fish of the same species simply because it is in their minds there is safety in numbers. These are carnivores and need only animal based foods to survive. A small group of these fish (Three to five) should be kept in no less than a thirty gallon aquarium. The spotted cardinal fish reached two to three inches in size. ). Specific foods, live clams (The ones you find at your grocery store) you can put them in on the half shell, frozen mysis shrimp, frozen brine shrimp (Not as a stable diet), scallop, cut fish meat small enough to fit in your fishes mouth and live brine shrimp.

 

 

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Edited by AcroporaLokani

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The Sushi

Great info!

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AcroporaLokani

Mandarins

 

Green Mandarin (Synchiropus splendidus) and Spotted Mandarin (Synchiropus picturatus)

 

I have grouped both these species together because the care requirements are the same for each.

 

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Mandarins are beautiful when alive and devastating to watch die, death is something that happens far too often for most mandarins due to their feeding habits. Mandarins only eat copapods and all the little sand bugs and worms they can find in the ocean and it is hard to try and change their minds when introducing them to your aquarium, It has happened but is not common enough to try and base your entire decision on buying one on it. In most cases keeping one of these fish in your nano aquarium (And posting about it) is like keeping a tang in a ten gallon tank. Both these fish reach four inches in size and other than their feeding habits they are very good reef fish.

 

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If you must have one of these fish it is best to try and find one in your LFS that is already eating frozen/dried/flake foods, It will be hard to find one that is eating but not impossible. Some people have had great success training their mandarins to eat frozen/dried/flake foods but you are basically playing Russian roulette with your mandarin’s life if you are not prepared for if/when the fish does not accept prepared foods.

 

A mandarin pair mating in the wild

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If you cannot find one eating but still feel compelled to keep one I would suggest at least one hundred pounds of porous live rock that is established for about a year or two for each mandarin fish you plan to keep. Refugiums also help to produce “pods” and keep an established colony for your mandarin to eat. These fish may take months to fully starve to death; if your mandarin’s stomach is deflated then it is not getting enough food. You can buy bottled pods but they are expensive and you will spend more money on the bottled pods than on the fish itself. I have seen some mandarins eat baby brine shrimp but while baby brine is healthier for your fish than adult brine shrimp they still are not a stable food source for your mandarins primary diet.

 

A spotted mandarin being hand fed frozen food.

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So to end the mandarin section, if you must keep one make sure you have an appropriate tank for the fish, If you can find one that eats prepared foods or manage to train it then good for you and your mandarin. If you can train your mandarin to eat feed, live brine shrimp, frozen brine shrimp (Not as a regular diet), cyclope-eeze, mysis shrimp and if you can get a mandarin to eat flake or pellet feed those as well (Only feed flake/pellet if that is the only food your mandarin will eat).

 

Synchiropus splendidus

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Synchiropus picturatus

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Gobies

 

Catalina Goby (Lythrypnus dalli)

 

These are not for the typical aquarium as they prefer the highest temperature of the aquarium they reside in to be 72F (far too low for a normal reef tank or normal fish only tanks), but they prefer the mid to high sixties (65F-68F) and will thrive in these conditions. Most people who keep the catalina goby have a species only aquarium or a biotope aquarium mimicking the area they come from. The catalina goby is a carnivore and only needs animal based food to survive. Specific foods, live brine shrimp, frozen brine shrimp (Not as a regular diet), cyclope-eeze and mysis shrimp.

 

These fish have a vibrant red and blue coloration and only grow to be two to three inches in size and other than the temperature requirements of this species they are a great addition to your aquarium.

 

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Clown Gobies (Gobiodon citrinus, Gobiodon atrangulatus, Gobiodon okinawae and Gobiodon strangulatus)

 

Clown gobies are commonly found in pico tanks (Aquariums under five gallons in size) because of their small size and low activity. These fish (depending on the subspecies) range from one inch to two and a half inches in size. These fish commonly live in acropora colonies but they can easily kill a small acropora frag from nipping at it (Larger colonies would be able to regain the lost tissue but small frags may suffer from the fish biting its flesh). These fish also like to live in soft corals and polyps and pose a much lesser threat to them than acropora simply because they grow faster and are heartier. These fish are carnivores and only require animal based food to survive. Specific foods, live brine shrimp, frozen brine shrimp (Not as a regular diet), cyclope-eeze and mysis shrimp.

 

 

Black Clown Goby

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Citron Clown Goby

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Green Clown Goby

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Yellow Clown Goby

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Banded Shrimp Goby (Stonogobiops nematodes)

 

The banded shrimp goby as the name suggest will form a symbiotic relationship with a pistol shrimp (Alpheus sp.); the pair will build a burrow together under a rock or in the gravel/sand. This fish does not require a pistol shrimp to survive but may like having one in the aquarium. The banded shrimp goby is one to two inches in size and is a good candidate for smaller nano tanks or pico tanks. This fish is a carnivore and only requires animal based foods to survive. Specific foods, live brine shrimp, frozen brine shrimp (Not as a regular diet), cyclope-eeze and mysis shrimp.

 

 

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Neon Goby (Elacatinus oceanops)

 

The neon goby is a popular fish because it is commonly tank bred and easy to care for. In the wild they are a cleaning fish that eats parasites off of other fish (A good alternative for cleaner wrasses). This fish is a carnivore and requires only animal based foods to survive. The neon goby only reaches one to two inches in size and like the other gobies listed are great for nano/pico tanks. These fishes color is black, silver and baby blue stripes that will be a nice eye catcher. Specific foods, live brine shrimp, frozen brine shrimp (Not as a regular diet), cyclope-eeze and mysis shrimp.

 

 

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Yellow Watchman Goby (Cryptocentrus cinctus)

 

The yellow watchman goby will form a symbiotic relationship with a pistol shrimp (Alpheus sp.) just like the banded shrimp goby. The yellow watchman goby is a bright yellow to dark golden color will electric blue dots all over its body. These fish grow to be three to five inches in size and need a larger tank than the other gobies listed. The yellow watchman goby on occasion will eat small shrimp and crabs in the aquarium and it can be very frustrating when you spend twenty dollars on a shrimp only to see your goby eat it in front of you eyes, this fish will not eat corals so it can be in a reef tank without small shrimp and crabs in it. Just as with the other gobies this one is a carnivore and only needs animal based foods to survive. Specific foods, live clams (The ones you find at your grocery store) they should be de-shelled and chopped, frozen krill (When larger), frozen mysis shrimp, frozen brine shrimp (Not as a stable diet), scallop, cut fish meat small enough to fit in your fishes mouth and live brine shrimp.

 

 

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Tangs, Not For Nano Tanks

 

Before I start with the different species I feel I should mention that before you buy a tang make sure you understand the fishes care requirements, adult size and feeding habits (Some tangs can grow to be over two feet long and will easily eat a whole pack of dried seaweed a day!). So unless you have a large tank I would suggest you not buy a tang simply because it would be cruel to keep one of these beautiful and active fish in a small aquarium.

 

One thing that does not help with these fish not being kept in smaller tanks is that they have a personality (I would compare my vlamingii tang to a puppy that does not poop on the floor or slobber on your leg), unlike most other fish these ones will actually recognize you when you walk up to the tank and even remember the way you move when getting their food out of the aquarium stand. These are truly smart and beautiful fish and deserve to be kept in a suitable tank. In smaller aquariums the water quality will be horrible and may even end up killing your beloved tang (Yes you will describe your tang as “beloved” once you have grown attached to him/her).

 

For feeding your tang I would suggest offering red, purple and green dried seaweed to give your fish a well rounded diet. Whenever someone tells me about how their tang is sick and asks what they should do, what medication should they soak the fish in I always tell them to fatten their tang up with dried seaweed, when I purchased my vlamingii tang he had lateral line disease and I simply fed him four to eight times a day with different types of dried seaweed (Just what he could eat in two to three minutes and keeping watch so none went to waist) and he healed up in about a week and is still alive and thriving to this day (The first picture in this thread is of my beloved vlamingii tang). I would recommend feeding your tang two or three times a day (If he/she is not sick that is), some will argue that more than one feeding a day or even every two day is over feeding but if you look at the difference in your tangs color, personality and health when kept fat on dried seaweed you will see why doing larger water changes and maybe even getting a better protein skimmer/filter is worth it for you when looking at your prized fish and for the fish itself.

 

So to end this I will say again tangs are NOT for nano tanks and for smaller species I would recommend at the least a seventy to one hundred gallon aquarium, the larger species may need upwards of a two hundred gallon aquarium (Perhaps even upwards of three hundred gallons). If you plan on keeping your juvenile tang in a smaller aquarium than what will be needed and then upgrading make sure before you buy the tang you will be able to upgrade in a reasonable amount of time, also look in to the end cost of the larger tank, filters/protein skimmer, lighting, water pumps, stand and heater (Larger equipment equals a larger price tag, a nano tank may only cost one or two hundred dollars to set up but larger aquariums could be upwards of one or two thousand dollars). And if you buy a tang when it is small and plan on trading it in to the fish store once it has grown perhaps you should look in to a nice clown fish that will not out grow your tank and get the tang out of your mind.

 

Yellow Tang (Zebrasoma flavescens)

 

Yellow tangs are easily the most popular species of tangs (And probably the second most popular saltwater fish next to the ocellaris clownfish). These fish are a bright yellow color with a little white scalpel on the fishes tail (Yes the majority of tangs have small razor sharp scalpel like blades in their tails, hence the common name “surgeon” fish). These fish grow to be eight inches to one foot in length and require a one hundred and twenty five gallon tank (For a minimum aquarium size) when fully grown. This fish is a herbivore and needs only plant matter in its diet, Tangs will commonly eat meaty foods but dried seaweed is the best thing to feed any tang because they will not get the required nutrients for good color and staving off disease from animal based foods. The yellow tang will school in large aquariums and in the wild but in smaller aquariums they will fight with fish of the same species. Specific foods, dried green seaweed, dried purple seaweed, dried brown seaweed, spirulina (Comes in flake food or frozen), and you can also feed different species of caulerpa.

 

 

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Blue Tang (Paracanthurus hepatus)

 

Perhaps the most tempting of all tangs to put in to a nano simply because small half inch to one inch individuals are commonly offered in fish stores but be aware that these fish can reach well over one foot in length and are extremely active fish by nature and requires a one hundred and twenty five gallon tank at the least. This fish is a herbivore and requires dried seaweed to truly thrive. Specific foods, dried green seaweed, dried purple seaweed, dried brown seaweed, spirulina (Comes in flake food or frozen), and you can also feed different species of caulerpa.

 

 

When buying this fish make sure to inspect it very closely to make sure it is not sick.

 

bluetang090108ue8.jpg

 

 

So to end this I would like to say if you plan on keeping any fish from a tang to a goby make absolutely positive that it will do well in your tank and that your aquarium can handle the bioload that comes with a fish.

 

I hope this helped you in making a decision on what fish you want to keep in your aquarium and what fish is an appropriate size for you aquarium. I will be updating with wrasse and anthias and a few other fish in the future

 

 

-Acro

Edited by AcroporaLokani

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dtfleming

you know there already is a fish guide on here

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lakshwadeep

Are these actually your photos?

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revaltion131
you know there already is a fish guide on here

 

Are we talking about Lgreen's? That's more of a list with very general information and in some cases, misinformation.

 

Nice job Acro. I especially liked the comments about feeding. It's hard to keep my mouth shut when people say don't feed every day because you'll raise your nitrates. That's BS and some fish, i.e. Anthias, Mandarins, sometimes Leopard Wrasses, need to be fed everyday or even multiple times a day or they will slowly waste away. Thank you! :bowdown:

 

P.S. Agree with lak, credit the photos if they aren't yours, maybe?

Edited by revaltion131

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uwwmatt
you know there already is a fish guide on here

 

-_-

 

 

 

Nice work. I linked it to my biocube resource guide.

Edited by uwwmatt

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AcroporaLokani
Nice job Acro. I especially liked the comments about feeding. It's hard to keep my mouth shut when people say don't feed every day because you'll raise your nitrates. That's BS and some fish, i.e. Anthias, Mandarins, sometimes Leopard Wrasses, need to be fed everyday or even multiple times a day or they will slowly waste away. Thank you! :bowdown:

 

Thanks, I just figured I would add in the feeding requirements because I got in to an argument with some one who said feeding your fish every three days is over feeding and once a week is proper.... I was like yea do you eat every day? I then explained the digestive rates of fish and how some need fed in order to live (Crazy how an animal needs fed huh :lol:) Then the guy huffed and puffed and went away with a bruised ego (It would not fit in to a stadium I tell you!).

 

And for the pics, I was planning on having a "thanks" section that I'll edit in once I write it (But all the websites did say the pictures could be used for educational purposes)

 

Nice work. I linked it to my biocube resource guide.

 

Thanks, I'll look at your biocube guide (Sounds interesting) :) I also wrote a coral guide (Link in sig) if you are interested.

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BKtomodachi

I think your feeding section is overly generalized.

*shrug*

 

Also, yes, more feeding does equate to more nitrates. I'm not saying that is any justification to reduce feeding, its just the way a closed system works.

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AcroporaLokani
I think your feeding section is overly generalized.

*shrug*

 

Well at least I do not have some vendetta against a perfect stranger I do not even know and just have to argue with over the internet. This is what the fifth thread you have attempted to argue with me about? Hmmm.... You must follow my posts, just plain funny you have nothing better to do.

 

Get a life/friends/boy friend/girl friend/job whatever one you would prefer.

 

But go ahead and argue, I think its funny that you are so set on wasting your life attempting to bother me.

 

Also, yes, more feeding does equate to more nitrates. I'm not saying that is any justification to reduce feeding, its just the way a closed system works.

 

I never disputed that. But if your system cannot support the fish you have the tank is not suitable.

 

And I don't think you're in anyplace to give advice since you felt it suitable to have left a pipe fish alone for over two weeks.

 

 

Good day to you, I wish I could say you were a worthy adversary to debate with but it honestly just makes me feel sorry for you.

 

-Acro

Edited by AcroporaLokani

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Payara

very helpful!!! thanks

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BKtomodachi

*slowly steps backwards out of thread*

:eek:

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jeremai
Well at least I do not have some vendetta against a perfect stranger I do not even know and just have to argue with over the internet. This is what the fifth thread you have attempted to argue with me about? Hmmm.... You must follow my posts, just plain funny you have nothing better to do.

 

Get a life/friends/boy friend/girl friend/job whatever one you would prefer.

 

But go ahead and argue, I think its funny that you are so set on wasting your life attempting to bother me.

 

 

 

I never disputed that. But if your system cannot support the fish you have the tank is not suitable.

 

And I don't think you're in anyplace to give advice since you felt it suitable to have left a pipe fish alone for over two weeks.

 

 

Good day to you, I wish I could say you were a worthy adversary to debate with but it honestly just makes me feel sorry for you.

 

-Acro

I know the internets is serious business and all, but seriously, take a chill pill.

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latazyo

wow

 

crybaby.jpg

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Todesengel

I said GOOD DAY!!!

 

On another note, I enjoyed this thread. I never knew the Imperator Angelfish changed like that, what does it look like while its changing? Or does it happen over night lol.

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cdelicath

Poop

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halfpint
*slowly steps backwards out of thread*

:eek:

Fo' realz yo.

:lol:

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Kraylen

####in amazing, thank you.

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Kraylen
I said GOOD DAY!!!

 

On another note, I enjoyed this thread. I never knew the Imperator Angelfish changed like that, what does it look like while its changing? Or does it happen over night lol.

 

 

Really?

 

Well, alot of the large angelfish will change colors... they pretty much all start out blue black and white, just different patterns.

 

It happens over a long period of time so... if you saw a "teenage" emperator it would look like a 50/50 of a juve and an adult. Really cool actually.

 

 

 

Acropora - Can you provide a write up on reef safe wrasse and anthias?

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frag

I like turtles.

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Hoosierfan
I like turtles.

 

Me too. How big of a tank do I need to have a sea turtle?

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jrgnd

Thanks for the guide...:)

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holdorf333

He's pretty hyper. One time is the "Insult the guy above you" threat, I said his av looked like his sister's STD-ridden special place, and he flipped. In a thread where you are guaranteed to get ripped on if you post there, none the less. Spaz.

Edited by holdorf333

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Ladyparts

lol this guide sucks

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vangvace
I think your feeding section is overly generalized.

*shrug*

 

Also, yes, more feeding does equate to more nitrates. I'm not saying that is any justification to reduce feeding, its just the way a closed system works.

 

Agreed. No real mention of the different types of food to feed outside of mandarins. Flake, frozen, live, etc. No mention of food prep.

No real mention of the grazing habits when you're not feeding them.

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