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Nano sapiens

Nano Sapiens 12g - Ye Olde Mixed Reef

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Nano sapiens
1 hour ago, Poodges said:

Man, I remember this tank from way back when.  Congrats on keeping it running for such a long time and it’s still looking great. Sorry to hear about your goby.  
 

@Rehype you gotta set something up to enjoy with the kids. That’s what brought me back. 

Thanks!  The little system 'takes a lick'in and keeps on tick'in' (at least so far)  :)

 

I'm also looking forward to seeing what Rehype comes up with!

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Rehype
1 hour ago, Poodges said:

Man, I remember this tank from way back when.  Congrats on keeping it running for such a long time and it’s still looking great. Sorry to hear about your goby.  
 

@Rehype you gotta set something up to enjoy with the kids. That’s what brought me back. 

 

You guys are right. Im seriously considering setting up something small for the kids. My son sometimes come across pics of my old setups and always gets excited and asks a ton of questions. Gotta see what the wife thinks. 

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Rehype
11 minutes ago, Nano sapiens said:

Thanks!  The little system 'takes a lick'in and keeps on tick'in' (at least so far)  🙂

 

I'm also looking forward to seeing what Rehype comes up with!

 

Thanks nano. Ill let you guys know what I decide to do.

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Lula_Mae
On 12/6/2019 at 9:26 AM, Nano sapiens said:

Thank you!  The bolt episode was a bit of a shocker, but as they say "Expect the unexpected!".    

 

As far as the Gobies go, can't complain as they had provided a lot of entertainment over the years.  Hope yours do well for a long time to come.

 

Borrowing a reference from Forest Gump, the Internet is "like a box of chocolates...you never know what you are going to get".   I always try to assume that folks mean well when they post...unless they prove me wrong.  The removal of the bolt and any metal corrosion residue, plus numerous water changes as well as a substantial reduction in nutrient levels, has virtually eliminated the sand bed bloom 👍

 

 

Glad to hear it's pretty much all gone! Kind of amazing how something so small can cause so many issues!

 

On 12/6/2019 at 9:43 AM, Rehype said:

 

You guys are right. Im seriously considering setting up something small for the kids. My son sometimes come across pics of my old setups and always gets excited and asks a ton of questions. Gotta see what the wife thinks. 

Doo eet! :lol:

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teenyreef

I've occasionally stuck a magnet on a long wand down in the back chambers just to see if anything sticks. Nice catch on that bolt!

 

Sorry to hear about the gbg. They are perfect, entertaining pico/nano fish, but they only live a few years. I just lost mine in the 40g too.

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Nano sapiens
3 hours ago, teenyreef said:

I've occasionally stuck a magnet on a long wand down in the back chambers just to see if anything sticks. Nice catch on that bolt!

 

Sorry to hear about the gbg. They are perfect, entertaining pico/nano fish, but they only live a few years. I just lost mine in the 40g too.

I think I'm going to add 'Run a magnet through the system twice a year' to my maintenance plan.

 

All these little gobies are great, but as you mentioned they do get old rather early.  Good thing they breed so fast as they are like a bottomless pit supply of bite sized snacks to their predators.  At least they live 2-3x longer than the smaller cleaner shrimp.

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mcarroll
On 10/15/2019 at 9:28 PM, Nano sapiens said:

They're not supposed to live this long, really.

Lack of good predators... (on purpose, of course...just sayin)

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Nano sapiens

Happy Holidays Update:

 

FTS - 12/31/19:

 

 

1637541359_12gFTS123119.jpg.581d85acf626055b755eb9b36d2cf86e.jpg

 

My goal this last quarter has been to guide the system back to its former more oligotrophic state and here’s a list of events:

 

1.  Removed a corroded bolt and any possible residual residue from the back chamber

2.  2-3x my normal water change volume for a month before going back to my regular WC schedule (1/2g @ 2x/wk)

3.  Thorough cleaning of the sand bed (including under rockwork) and weekly use of filter sock during cleaning

4.  Reduction of P04 and N03 since I had experimented with elevated levels of 0.08 ppm and 50 ppm, respectively, to see what effect that would have on a persistent sand bed algae issue (elevated levels had no noticeable effect, but reduced levels down to ‘barely detectable/undectable’ PO4 and 8 ppm NO3 have been very positive). 

5.  Rehoming of a Saddled Blenny due to near elimination of all benthic creatures and aggression (attacking of my hand, just like a Clownfish would).  Single 2-3/4” Eyebrow Barnacle Blenny is the only fish currently in the system.

6.  A few small red-legged hermits added to help clean up residual algae from the elevated nutrients experiment.

7.  Final extirpation of the invasive ‘Molten Lava Leptoseris’

 

Old cell phone photo dump:

 

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The result of all this is now a clean, healthy system with minimal algae on the rock work (just a small patch or two of Derbesia) and a sand bed that stays clean for days.  Now that pressure from fish predation is much reduced (the resident Barnacle Blenny isn’t an active hunter throughout the system, but just eats whatever drifts by) the benthic macrofauna has repopulated in a big way and I now regularly see the old cast of characters such as Bristleworms, Mysids, Pods, tiny Collunista Snails, sand bed worms and Micro Brittlestars.

 

Coral:  In addition to a few test kits, I typically use the Ricordia to gauge the general condition of the system.  If they are nicely colored and expanded, all is good (conversely, if they are continuously contracted and don’t wave a bit in the current, then usually something is off).  For Zoanthids, good color and expansion.  For the Seriatopora, good coloration and polyp extension.  Puffy Acans are typically happy Acans (although every few days they tend to contract for a while, presumably to clean out their gut).  The stony coral encrusters are a bit more difficult to read as the polyps are quite small (or do not protrude at all in some species) and they are very tolerant of less than optimal conditions.  Besides obvious problems like recession, color and growth are the best indicators.

 

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One ‘oops’ moment this quarter was having the pump off for a few hours at night and the tank going down to 72 degrees (no noticeable effect on the animals).

 

Only change in maintenance is that I now clean the return pump/rotating flow nozzle every month (instead of every 2-3 months) to try and maintain a stronger, more consistent flow rate.

 

Currently awaiting my AquaBiomics bacterial biome report.  At this point in time, this test has little applicable value and is largely for curiosity’s sake.  As more and more tests are conducted, the hope is that the research will lead to a better/more complete understanding of the reef aquarium bacterial community.

 

And finally…Happy New Year to all!

 

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mcarroll

I had a similar oops during maintentance recently leaving a heater off....tank got only 1-2 degrees cooler than you reported but I lost a large colony over it.  

 

Tank did better "idling" for five years while I was raising my kid than now that I'm starting to get more actively engaged.  I'm rusty.

 

Your tank looks GREAT btw.  Well done!  

 

(We must've been shopping for our live rock around the same time BTW...my system is about the same age as yours....11-12'ish.)

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Nano sapiens
30 minutes ago, mcarroll said:

I had a similar oops during maintentance recently leaving a heater off....tank got only 1-2 degrees cooler than you reported but I lost a large colony over it.  

 

Tank did better "idling" for five years while I was raising my kid than now that I'm starting to get more actively engaged.  I'm rusty.

 

Your tank looks GREAT btw.  Well done!  

 

(We must've been shopping for our live rock around the same time BTW...my system is about the same age as yours....11-12'ish.)

Thank you.  Sorry to hear of the colony loss. 

 

This tank had a 7 degree drop and probably more than 5 hours without circulation, but luckily the corals I have are all quite resilient.  The reason why this happened was that I had replaced a noisy outlet timer (I use these without setting any hourly 'on/off' settings since it's easier to just use the thumb wheel instead of pulling out the pump's plug each time to turn it off/on) with a replacement, but for some unknown reason it turned off all by itself (it was quite old and is now in the recycling bin).

 

The live rock in this nano tank is over 20 years old as it came from my previous 55g reef tank that I had set up in 1998.

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Nano sapiens

I just received a bacterial microbiome report from Aquabiomics for this 12g nano reef.  The main take-away points are:

 

  1. Diversity & balance higher than 50th percentile of tested reef tanks
  2. Balance Score (Correlation with Typical Abundance) shows similarities and differences compared to the 'typical' reef tank
  3. Huge relative abundance of Pelagibacteraceae (Gram-negative, rod-shaped, free-living Bacteria (Alphaproteobacteria), aerobic & chemoheterotrophic, previously called SAR11, thought to be the most abundant bacterial group in the ocean worldwide. Well-adapted for life in the low-nutrient waters of the open ocean. Require reduced sulfur compounds, glycine, and dissolved organic carbon for growth).  Distant runner ups: Hyphomicrobiaceae (Gram-negative Bacteria (Alphaproteobacteria), mostly rod-shaped, some free-living, Mostly aerobic & chemoheterotrophic, some photoheterotrophic, Extremely diverse, widely distributed and highly abundant in marine habitats including open ocean, sediments, and algal biofilms. Degrade sulfur-containing compounds (e.g. sulfite, DMSP). Many use methylated amines (MA) as primary nitrogen source) & Rhodobacteraceae (Gram-negative Bacteria (Alphaproteobacteria), mostly rod-shaped, some free-living, Mostly aerobic & chemoheterotrophic, some photoheterotrophic, Extremely diverse, widely distributed and highly abundant in marine habitats including open ocean, sediments, and algal biofilms. Degrade sulfur-containing compounds (e.g. sulfite, DMSP). Many use methylated amines (MA) as primary nitrogen source)
  4. Typical ammonia−oxidizing microbes (with the exception of Nitrososphaeraceae (0.00026), which apparently is not typically registered in samples).
  5. Nitrite−oxidizing Nitrospiraceae lower than typical
  6. No Cyanobacteria species found
  7. No Fish pathogen species found
  8. No Coral pathogen species found

 

From the test reports I've seen online, there appears to be a general trend of decreasing diversity with age.  This tank actually has a higher diversity (66%) compared to the 50th percentile.  This is interesting because the only additional bacteria are from occasional new specimens (~ once a year, perhaps), Red Sea Blue Bucket salt (has ocean bacteria) and weekly feeding of live earthworms from the compost heap.

 

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Nano sapiens

Rare Trip to the LFS (new additions):

 

Pulsing Xenia:  Couple of 'firsts' here.  This is one of those corals that I've never kept in a reef tank despite 30+ years of reefing and it's the only true soft coral (Octocoral) that I've ever had in this 12g nano.  Pulsing is not as rapid as in the LFS, which I expected since I have more flow.  But it looks happy enough and it adds some motion in the tank.  Just hope it doesn't spread...

 

1353195356_12gPulsingXenia_012520.jpg.bc401f0568c7cb4e02149fed060d3272.jpg

 

 

Duncan:  Looking like a really plump zoanthid, this coral I haven't kept since around 2003 or so when they first came on the scene (they were mostly dull grey at that time, this one at least has a greenish base and some purple on the tips).  The spot it occupies is perfect for this type of lower light LPS coral and I expect it will fill out quickly.

 

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Blastomussa:  This is my 'challenge' coral as it's been really difficult to keep one of these going for more than a year in the system.  So far it looks like a 'happy camper', but that's the trick I've seen them play in the past.  Anyway, fingers crossed...

 

927325542_12gBlastomussa_012520.jpg.b0b916f40fe45692f56eeca0b9524f65.jpg

 

 

Placed all the 'Vampire' Zoas that were on a rock on the sand bed up in my rock work.  They should do just fine as long as I keep the Pavona away.

 

1697267848_12gVampireZoas_012520.thumb.jpg.23ba7c25841217d8e0fd6018c1582d0a.jpg

 

 

And a quick off-angle FTS to show placement...

 

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Almost forgot this little guy (won't sit still for a clear pic).  Supposed to be an ORA 'Hybrid' (Yellow x Blue cross), but I'm not so sure...

 

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MaineReefkeeper

Been following this tank for a long time and have always loved it! New additions look amazing! 🔥🔥🔥 So happy to see you expanding and still enjoying this tank after so long.🙂

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Nano sapiens
56 minutes ago, MaineReefkeeper said:

Been following this tank for a long time and have always loved it! New additions look amazing! 🔥🔥🔥 So happy to see you expanding and still enjoying this tank after so long.🙂

Thanks.  Every once in a while I get the bug to add something new or to propagate something that I already have (like the Vampire Zoas), but it's not always easy to find the space.  There's something quite satisfying in watching a small frag or polyp successfully fill in an area.

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debbeach13
10 hours ago, Nano sapiens said:

Just hope it doesn't spread...

LOL xenia that does not spread. You are just too funny. I love mine but pick out little clumps that float away from the main cluster all the time. 

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Nano sapiens
1 hour ago, debbeach13 said:

LOL xenia that does not spread. You are just too funny. I love mine but pick out little clumps that float away from the main cluster all the time. 

Yeah, I know, but there's always hope!  😊

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