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Nano Sapiens 12g - Ye Olde Mixed Reef

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Nano sapiens

CADLights 12 gal. Nano (most current FTS pic will be posted directly below, scroll down for tank specs, etc.):

 

Dec 2018:

 

1201020700_12gFTS_120118.thumb.jpg.2025c96a4c2c07c31eb25efa1d18da11.jpg

 

Aug 2018 (10th Year):

 

1096355734_12gFTS.jpg.a14b1a62d42d58c6815a1836e102e483.jpg

 

 

Dec 2017:

 

5a34482086559_12gFTS_121517.jpg.de400dc6c413fb7ce0c265a358de6044.jpg

 

 

Jul 2017 (9th year):

 

12 9th Year3_061917.jpg

 

 

Dec 2016:

 

12g%20Cadlights%20FTS_121016_zpsa0qnrpdc

 

Jul 2016:

 

12g%20FTS_July%202016_zps5uh2wvok.jpg

 

Mar 2016:

 

12g%20FTS%20030216_zpsc7thiysq.jpg

 

Dec 2015:

 

12g%20Cadlights%20FTS_122015_zps7wb6gtou

 

 

 

 

 

July 2015:

 

12g%20FTS%207th%20Year_071815_zpswjfypkj

 

April, 2015:

 

FTS_041215_zpsfhxg34dz.jpg

 

 

Jan 2015 (before the weekly cleaning):

 

a3796636-70ac-4f23-83a0-7d91a1b2753a_zps

 

 

Oct 2014:

 

12gOct22014_zpsb85e46e7.jpg

 

 

Sept 2014:

 

12gFTS3_090614_zps7b68143b.jpg

 

July 2014:

 

12g6Years_062914_zps4b26bf13.jpg

 

 

April 2014:

 

12gFTS_041314_zps90070d22.jpg

 

 

Feb 2014:

 

12gNano021614_zps0969efce.jpg

 

 

Dec 2013:

 

12gFTS120113_zps6c3fa092.jpg

 

 

July 2013:

 

12gFTSJuly2013_zps9410cdf5.jpg

 

 

June, 2013:

 

12gSM061513_zps028ceb81.jpg

 

 

 

Mar, 2013 ('Royal Blue' LEDs/yellow filter):

 

12gFlorescence1_zps0676f956.jpg

 

Jan, 2013:

 

12gNano010113.jpg

Oct, 2012:

FTS1100512.jpg

June, 2012 (4th Year Anniversary!)

12GNano060312.jpg

Feb, 2012

12GNano020512-2.jpg

July 2nd, 2011

Cadlight12g070111.jpg

March 27th, 2011

Cadlights12g032711.jpg

June 29th, 2010

12gCadlights062910.jpg

March 25th, 2010

12gNanoFTS032810.jpg

January 24th, 2010

12gNano012410.jpg


November 2009

FTS110109.jpg

LR110109.jpg

LRActinicsOnly110709.jpg

 

July, 2009:

 

12gCADLightsNanoCloseup062809.jpg

 

 

Early pic of the tank at around 1 month (August 2008):

 

12galnanofrontview.jpg

 

 

SPECIFICATIONS (as of Jun 2019)

TANK

  • CADLights 12g Bowfront Glass AIO (All-in-One)

LIGHTING

  • CADLights Stock Canopy:
  • DIY LED (Solderless) w/Coralux 5-up board and STORM controller):

CH 1 ('White', STORM 112): (3) Cree XML-2 'NW', (2) Cree XML-2 'WW'

CH 2 ('Blue', STORM 172): (4) Cree XT-E 'RB' (450nm-455nm), (2) Cree XP-E2 'B' (465-470nm), (4) Exotic 'B' (475nm)

CH 3 ('Violet', STORM 162): (5) Exotic 'HV' (428nm), (3) Exotic 'V' (403nm)

CH 4 ('Cyan', STORM 25): (4) Exotic 'Cyan' (495nm)

CH 5 ('Red', STORM 20): (2) Exotic 'Deep Red' (660nm)

  • Total lighting duration: 8 hrs.
  • 'Blue' channel: 8 hrs. (incl. ramp-up 135 min./ramp-down 135 min.)
  • 'Violet' channel: 7 hrs. (incl. ramp-up 135 min./ramp-down 135 min.)
  • 'White'/'Cyan'/'Red' channels: 5 hrs (incl. ramp up 135 min./ramp-down 135 min.)
  • All LEDs on together at their highest programmed 'peak' settings: 2 - 1/2 hrs.
  • All days 'cloudy' (STORM setting = 1)
  • Spectral description: ~ 14k
  • PAR (all LEDs on together at their highest programmed settings): ~160 (center, mid point of tank)

EQUIPMENT

  • Tunze Silence 1073.080 (210 gph) Return Pump
  • Hydor Rotating Water Flow Deflector Nozzle (gutted, used as water flow deflector only)
  • (1) Eheim-Jager TruTemp (50W)
  • (2) Large 'Pet Bottle' ATO units
  • Analog Thermometer

FILTRATION

  • Live Rock
  • Live Sand

MAINTENANCE

  • Water Changes: 1/2g, 2x/wk (1g total) - (IO/Tropic Marin 'Classic'/Red Sea Blue Bucket mix + RO/DI water)
  • Evaporation Control: RO/DI
  • Alkalinity: Kalkwasser (added to ATOs)
  • Calcium: Kalkwasser (added to ATOs)
  • Magnesium: ESV B-Ionic Magnesium
  • Iodine: Kent Concentrated Iodine (3-4 drops/wk)
  • Cleaning: Weekly sand bed/back chambers vacuuming (occasional use of a filter sock), back wall algae/bio-film removal & live rock blasting with a turkey baster. Break down/cleaning of return pump and Hydor water flow deflector every month or two.  2x/year cleaning of heater.  Vacuuming under each base live rock every few months on a rotational basis over a year's time.

FEEDING

  • Reef-Roids
  • Frozen Mysids
  • Frozen Spirulina Enriched Brine Shrimp
  • Ocean Nutrition Prime Reef Flakes/OSI Spirulina Flakes
  • Baby Earthworms (1x/wk. from the compost heap)

TESTING (~3x/Wk)

  • Alkalinity (~9.0 dKh - Salifert)
  • Specific Gravity (1.025 - 1.026)

TESTING (~2 weeks)

  • Calcium (~430 ppm - Salifert)
  • Magnesium (~1300 ppm - Salifert)

TESTING (Occasionally)

  • Phosphate
  • Nitrate

 

TANK INHABITANTS

 

CORAL

 

Seriatopora:

  • 'Bird of Paradise' Birdsnest (Seriatopora caliendrum) - Diablo Corals, July 2015
  • 'Ponape Birdsnest' (Seriatopora aculeata?) - Diablo Corals, July 2015

 

Montipora:

  • 'Sunset' Montipora (M. danae?) - Neptune Aquatics, June 2009

 

Others:

  • Metallic Gold Pavona (Pavona maldivensis) - Neptune Aquatics, June 2009
  • 'Fallen Horizon' Leptoseris - Legendary Corals
  • Pink Stylocoeniella - California Reef Co
  • Rainbow Acan - Legendary Corals
  • Mint-Green Pavona (Pavona descussata?) - Sacramento Frag Swap, Sept 2009
  • Leptastrea (Leptastrea pruinosa) - Standard neon-green center/reddish outer, 2001
  • Assorted Ricordia Mushrooms (Ricordia yuma, Ricordia florida) - Aquatic Connections, Legendary Corals, Coralmorphic, Unique Corals
  • Various Rhodactis inchoata sp. Mushrooms (purple, orange, green, red, etc.) - Aquatic Collections, Unique Corals
  • Assorted Zoanthids/Palys (Sunny D's, Mohawk, Blue Hornet, Utter Chaos, Vampires, etc.) - California Reef Co,, Legendary Corals, Diablo Corals

 

Fish
 
  • Yellowline Goby (Elacatinus figaro) - 1
  • Green Banded Goby (Tigrigobius multifasciatus) - 1
  • Eyebrow Barnacle Blenny (Ekemblemaria myersi) - 1
  • Tangaroa Shrimp Goby (Ctenogobiops tangaroai) - 1
  • Saddled Blenny (Malacoctenus triangulatus) - 1

 

Inverts (CUC/hitchhikers):

  • Collonista snails (Collonista amakusaens)
  • Limpet snails (unknown species - white, small 3/8" max)
  • Bristleworms (Eurythoe complanata?)
  • Dwarf Zebra Orange/Black Hermit Crab (Calcinus laevimanus)
  • Mexican Red Leg (Clibanarius digueti)
  • Mini Brittle Stars (Amphipholis squamata?)
  • Mysid shrimp

 

 

 

12g FTS 10th Year Aug 2018.jpg

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dshnarw

nice, simple, aesthetically pleasing.

 

well done!

 

and :welcome: to NR!

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plainrt

I love the 12 and 22 gal cads but some horror stories scare me away from them.I like the rock work and corals.

 

 

welcome to nr and good luck with setup

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Nano sapiens
nice, simple, aesthetically pleasing.

 

well done!

 

and :welcome: to NR!

 

Thanks for the welcome :)

 

Looking through the Nano reef galleries I've seen a great many different styles of aquascaping.

 

I've envisioned this one as a simple small 'outcroping' with room on the top for the growth of branching type SPS corals. It should loose the 'short'n'stubby' look by next year :D

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Nano sapiens

 

 

I love the 12 and 22 gal cads but some horror stories scare me away from them.I like the rock work and corals.


welcome to nr and good luck with setup


Thank you, too, for the welcome!

I had heard that Cadlights had some problems with the light fixtures on their larger tanks. I decided to go with manufacturer because of what I had read regarding the tank itself. This tank is very nicely built, looks great and is very robust. The lighting fixture has a 'high-tech' look to it and it has functioned very well so far.

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matty0206

Very nice! Very clean.

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Zombo

What was the pet water bottle mod? I'm getting a CADlights 22 soon and would rather not pony out the $$ for an Osmolator...

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Nano sapiens
What was the pet water bottle mod? I'm getting a CADlights 22 soon and would rather not pony out the $$ for an Osmolator...

 

All these pet water bottles have at least one ball inside the metal tube. Since the ball is kept inside the tube by a slight crimping of the tube's end, the end must be removed so the ball can fall out (I used a dremel with a small cut-off wheel). Once the ball is removed you'll need to position the bottle so that the tube's opening is just barely under the water surface. As water evaporates and the tube end is exposed to air, a small amount of air will enter the bottle and displace some of the water inside. This process will go on until the tube end is once again under water.

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jervismun
And to keep things really simple I've employed a pet watering bottle to keep the tank topped up using RO water:

 

12galNanoReefH20Bottle.jpg

 

Works like a charm (when modified correctly) and provides up to a week of fresh water before it needs refilling (yea!, no more daily fill ups!).

 

This is totally innovative!!! I've learned something new today... thanks!

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Nano sapiens
This is totally innovative!!! I've learned something new today... thanks!

 

I remember seeing this principle in action back in high school biology class. I've also seen it used in a commercial product for supplying a constant source of water for a dog or cat (a bottle emptying out into an integrated tray). For smaller pets they use the 'ball inside the metal tube' method to seal off the entrance. When the pet nudges the ball, water drips out. It isn't a perfect system since the ball allows a few drops to leak, but you wouldn't want the mess of an open receptacle filled with water in a hamster or guinea pig cage :o

 

The main caution point to this modified pet bottle system is that if the cap seal or the bottle itself should ever develop a leak then air would be allowed into the bottle and consequently it would push all the fresh water out into the tank. These are the things to be mindful of:

 

1. A good fitting, durable seal.

2. Sturdy plastic bottle.

3. Cap must be tightened snugly on the bottle to eliminate any potential air leakage.

4. Refill bottle as full as possible before using.

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scottyreef

Ah very nice little CAD i am glad to see more CADlights tanks up here.I actully considered getting a 12 but when i got it from CAD it broke while in transit but oceanreflections took care of it and i op'd to get the 22g

 

cheers

scott

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Nano sapiens
Ah very nice little CAD i am glad to see more CADlights tanks up here.I actully considered getting a 12 but when i got it from CAD it broke while in transit but oceanreflections took care of it and i op'd to get the 22g

 

cheers

scott

 

I was also offered a 22 gal. in place of the 12 gal. since the lighting for the 12 was on back-order when I originally ordered. I had to stick with the 12 gal. in order to fit the space I had prepared for that size of tank footprint.

 

Next year I may go for a larger 32 gal. cube tank. I torn down my 50 gal. tall acrylic show tank (only 13" wide) recently after many years of frustration not being able to get the aqua scaped look I desired. I also don't care for acrylic tanks when it comes to reef aquariums due to how easy they are to scratch.

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jmigchelbrink

Hi, quick question about the top off system

What is stopping the salt from diffusing into the container, diluting the tank rapidly?

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Nano sapiens
Hi, quick question about the top off system

What is stopping the salt from diffusing into the container, diluting the tank rapidly?

 

As long as the metal tube remains immersed under water there is virtually no exchange between salt water in the aquarium and fresh water in the bottle. Only when the tube end is exposed to air (and the air naturally rises into the bottle) is fresh water displaced to end up in the tank.

 

I had to think a moment about the 'why' of this process and here's my take on the subject: In this system there is a specific equilibrium point that is reached between the bottle's fresh water and the tank's salt water. As an example, when the bottle is freshly filled and placed in its position there is a small release of fresh water into the tank since the bottle, being higher than the tank, is under a slightly elevated pressure (same principle as a simple siphon, water will only flow from high to low, not visa-versa). The difference here is that the bottle is air tight, so the inside pressure can equalize at some point with the pressure of the tank water when the bottle's tube is fully immersed. Once pressure equilibrium is reached neither fresh water nor salt water can flow in either direction. The state of equilibrium is broken when the water level of the tank is reduced (as through evaporation or removal of water by other means) and air can then enter the bottle through the tube and provide pressure to displace some fresh water into the tank. Air can no longer enter the bottle when the tank water level rises again to cover the tube end (due to the previously released fresh water), and so equilibrium is restored. And so the cycle will continue keeping the tank water level constant until the bottle is completely empty.

Edited by Nano sapiens
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jmigchelbrink
As long as the metal tube remains immersed under water there is virtually no exchange between salt water in the aquarium and fresh water in the bottle. Only when the tube end is exposed to air (and the air naturally rises into the bottle) is fresh water displaced to end up in the tank.

 

I had to think a moment about the 'why' of this process and here's my take on the subject: In this system there is a specific equilibrium point that is reached between the bottle's fresh water and the tank's salt water. As an example, when the bottle is freshly filled and placed in its position there is a small release of fresh water into the tank since the bottle, being higher than the tank, is under a slightly elevated pressure (same principle as a simple siphon, water will only flow from high to low, not visa-versa). The difference here is that the bottle is air tight, so the inside pressure can equalize at some point with the pressure of the tank water when the bottle's tube is fully immersed. Once pressure equilibrium is reached neither fresh water nor salt water can flow in either direction. The state of equilibrium is broken when the water level of the tank is reduced (as through evaporation or removal of water by other means) and air can then enter the bottle through the tube and provide pressure to displace some fresh water into the tank. Air can no longer enter the bottle when the tank water level rises again to cover the tube end (due to the previously released fresh water), and so equilibrium is restored. And so the cycle will continue keeping the tank water level constant until the bottle is completely empty.

 

 

I'm not disagreeing that the top off will work as you say, the only problem is you will be topping off with saltwater. The saltwater and the freshwater will reach equilibrium with each other, as they are permanently connected through the metal tube. I understand your logic behind it, but you are assuming the salt and freshwater remain separate. If you want me to get technical, the concentration gradient of salt drives diffusion from an area of high concentration (the tank) to an area of low concentration (reservoir). This is modeled by Fick's law, I don't know how interested you are in transport phenomena. I have to be interested, I am a chemical engineering student at Johns Hopkins.

 

The problem is as soon as you place a new container of fresh water on top, the salt will quickly diffuse into the container. Your salinity will drop quickly. I know the container is not that big, but in a small tank, it could have a more significant impact. If I were you I would set it up as you have it, bust out your refractometer, and test the SG before its in place, and then after a few hours test the tank and the FW reservoir.

 

I hope this helps. Other than that, you have a great looking tank. That yuma is gorgeous!

 

-Joel

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Nano sapiens
I'm not disagreeing that the top off will work as you say, the only problem is you will be topping off with saltwater. The saltwater and the freshwater will reach equilibrium with each other, as they are permanently connected through the metal tube. I understand your logic behind it, but you are assuming the salt and freshwater remain separate. If you want me to get technical, the concentration gradient of salt drives diffusion from an area of high concentration (the tank) to an area of low concentration (reservoir). This is modeled by Fick's law, I don't know how interested you are in transport phenomena. I have to be interested, I am a chemical engineering student at Johns Hopkins.

 

The problem is as soon as you place a new container of fresh water on top, the salt will quickly diffuse into the container. Your salinity will drop quickly. I know the container is not that big, but in a small tank, it could have a more significant impact. If I were you I would set it up as you have it, bust out your refractometer, and test the SG before its in place, and then after a few hours test the tank and the FW reservoir.

 

I hope this helps. Other than that, you have a great looking tank. That yuma is gorgeous!

 

-Joel

 

Unfortunately, I do not have a refractometer.

 

I measure my SG every two weeks with a typcial 'dip and read' hydrometer. While this type of hydometer is not the most accurate type, I have found that the SG has remained very stable at a reading of 1.0245.

 

 

I know this is subjective, but how about a practical test? I just took a swig of the fresh water currently in the bottle which has been supplying water for 4 days to the tank since it was last refilled. Tastes the same as the fresh water I originally put in. I also tested the fresh water in the bottle with the hydometer and I could not get a reading at all (lower limit reading of the device is 1.017). According to your comments I should be reading the same SG for both the tank and the freshwater in the bottle since diffusion should have 'rapidly taken place'.

 

I am aware of the action of sustances in solution moving from a higher concentration to a lower (diffusion). I hope most people remember this from high school biology or physics class :)

 

Hypothesis(s):

 

1. Possibility of a pressure gradient created in the system that retards or prevents the salt solution from entering the fresh water solution in the bottle.

 

2. Possibility that diffusion is indeed occuring, but due to the relatively small diameter of the tube and the 5-7 day frequency of refilling (and perhaps other factors) that the effect is not noticeable with the coarse measuring methods available to me.

 

Interesting that what is such a simple application on a practical level is not so simple to describe in detail theoretically.

 

The R. yuma is really something and I was very happy to see it produced an offspring. I'm experimenting to get a proper picture out of my camera that accurately reflects the true color and will post it up here if/when I do.

 

Thanks for your input. While I am not formally trained in chemical engineering or fluid dynamics I've always had an interest in 'systems' of any sort.

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jmigchelbrink
1. Possibility of a pressure gradient created in the system that retards or prevents the salt solution from entering the fresh water solution in the bottle.

No. There is a small difference in pressure between the bottle and the tank, as the bottle is at a slightly higher height, but this does not stop diffusion. If this was true your salinity would be a function of the depth of your tank.

 

2. Possibility that diffusion is indeed occuring, but due to the relatively small diameter of the tube and the 5-7 day frequency of refilling (and perhaps other factors) that the effect is not noticeable with the coarse measuring methods available to me.

I guess this is possible. If it were me, I would not risk all of my beautiful livestock. I would definitely go buy a refractometer (they are only 30 bucks on ebay) and verify your qualitative tests.

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Nano sapiens

But, an experiment is much more fun :) :

 

WaterBottleExperiment.jpg

WaterBottleExperimentTubeCloseup.jpg

 

The dye is from a saltwater Ph test kit (20 drops) which has been added to the saltwater in the Pyrex container (1.0245 SG). The pet bottle has been filled half way with pure RO water. I've covered the experiment with a towel since I am not sure if the dye is photo sensitive over time.

 

I'm going to leave this experiment for one week to see if the fresh water bottle shows any signs of turning pink-purple.

Edited by Nano sapiens
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Weetabix7

I'm kinda surprised no one has asked this yet, but what's to stop the metal tube on the pet bottle from rusting?

What's to stop the metal from reacting with the SW in other ways and possibly contaminating the tank?

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Roc!
I'm kinda surprised no one has asked this yet, but what's to stop the metal tube on the pet bottle from rusting?

What's to stop the metal from reacting with the SW in other ways and possibly contaminating the tank?

 

 

It's most likely made from Stainless Steel, but needs to be watched as it will begin to rust over time.

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Zombo
I'm kinda surprised no one has asked this yet, but what's to stop the metal tube on the pet bottle from rusting?

What's to stop the metal from reacting with the SW in other ways and possibly contaminating the tank?

 

Easy enough to replace with acrylic tubing :)

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Nano sapiens
It's most likely made from Stainless Steel, but needs to be watched as it will begin to rust over time.

 

True, true, many 'stainless' steels could be classified as 'stain resistant'. Some of the stainless steel alloys are really and truely rust proof, but they tend to be more expensive since they have a higher percentage of alloy metals (chromium, vanadium, etc.) mixed in with the steel.

 

Since this is an inexpensive pet bottle I've been watching the metal tube closely. In nearly two months of use I haven't seen any obvious signs of rust...and I hope it stays that way :)

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Nano sapiens
But, an experiment is much more fun :) :

 

WaterBottleExperiment.jpg

WaterBottleExperimentTubeCloseup.jpg

 

The dye is from a saltwater Ph test kit (20 drops) which has been added to the saltwater in the Pyrex container (1.0245 SG). The pet bottle has been filled half way with pure RO water. I've covered the experiment with a towel since I am not sure if the dye is photo sensitive over time.

 

I'm going to leave this experiment for one week to see if the fresh water bottle shows any signs of turning pink-purple.

 

One week is up and here are the results:

 

WaterBottleExperimentafter1Week.jpg

 

As can be seen there is no pink-purple coloration whatsoever showing in the water bottle. For all practical purposes it is clear that diffusion from salt water in the bowl to fresh water in the bottle is not an issue with this water top-off system.

 

Its been fun, but now its time to reinstall back onto the aquarium B)

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plainrt

any more full tank shots or shots of more of the tank.Im wondering if this tank would fit on a biocube stand.There both 15x15.

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