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Orange Fan Sponge


basser1

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Well, like the title says, I was at my LFS yesterday and they had some really nice looking sponges. They called them a fan sponge. Are these difficult to keep? Does anyone have any info as far as care and what their requirements are? Thanks,

 

Basser1 ;)

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ReadyReefer

i agree with FLcracker, although some have had success w/out feeding, although those were in larger tanks with heavy feeding of fishes

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chrisdamage

N-E-V-E-R let it touch the air... even when you are putting it into your tank... my best advice is to just fully submerge the bag that you get it in from your LFS and let it out(without letting it touch the air!!!) then do a water change immediately(in case anything harmful came with the LFS water)... position it in a part of your tank that it won't be exposed when you do water changes and also be sure that if your water accidentally gets too low, the sponge won't be affected by air bubbles shooting from your pump(I had this happen to me once to the demise of my beautiful orange sponge)... If a sponge touches air of ANY kind, it will stop being able to feed(the air forms microscopic bubbles in the sponge's tissue that keep it from digesting food) and it will slowly wither away... on a side not, sponges are great natural filters for tank water also...

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FLcracker94

Sponges can be in air for a couple seconds...only like 5 though lol. If your fast when taking it out of the bag, it should be fine. The water around it will keep out air for a couple seconds. It will save you from waterchanges if your fast. Be too slow though, and you got a dead sponge.

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chrisdamage
Sponges can be in air for a couple seconds...only like 5 though lol. If your fast when taking it out of the bag, it should be fine. The water around it will keep out air for a couple seconds. It will save you from waterchanges if your fast. Be too slow though, and you got a dead sponge.

 

your an expletive who doesn't seem to know what he is talking about

 

please stop leading others astray with your idiocy

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Hi!

 

Does the sponge you're looking at look like the one in this pic?

 

chaliceandsponge.jpg

 

Just FYI.. I expose this sponge to air on a weekly basis. The only real precaution I take is making sure I remove and air bubbles that may be attached to it afterwards.

 

The "no air rule" does not apply to ALL sponges. Both this and a red tree sponge I had dealt with air exposure and had no ill effects.

 

Here is a bit from Ken at sealifeflorida.com who collects many sponges including the one in my tank, on red tree sponges and the yellow or orange sp I have pictured.

 

Contrary to everything you’ll read about sponges, these sponges can be safely removed from the water and exposed to air for brief periods of time without any lasting damages. We’ve handled thousands of these sponges over the last 30 years and most have been exposed to the air for brief periods of time without any problems, so don’t make a huge deal about not letting the sponge touch the air while you move it from tank to tank or while you mount it on a rock..

 

I recall him saying the only sponge he's had a issue with exposing to air was a blue sp.

 

Anyway, you can go back to calling each other names and stuff now.

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ReadyReefer
Hi!

 

Does the sponge you're looking at look like the one in this pic?

 

chaliceandsponge.jpg

 

Just FYI.. I expose this sponge to air on a weekly basis. The only real precaustion I take is making sure I remove and air bubbles that may be attached to it afterwards.

 

The "no air rule" does not apply to ALL sponges. Both this and a red tree sponge I had dealt with air exposure and had no ill effects.

 

i personally would still not do it if wasnt ablolutely necessary

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chrisdamage

I had an orange sponge that looked identical, I exposed it to air... it died... do what you want, I'm just warning you... people in this hobby will give you extremely conflicting advice so my best advice to you is to do your own research

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I had an orange sponge that looked identical, I exposed it to air... it died... do what you want, I'm just warning you... people in this hobby will give you extremely conflicting advice so my best advice to you is to do your own research

 

Not to give you a hard time... but do you KNOW that is why it died?

What other factors might have been involved in the sponges demise? How old was the tank? How were you feeding it? What were the water parameters? You could go on an on with other possible reasons.

 

The observation you've made about the death of your sponge is antidotal.

 

It's a bit like saying:

 

Everyone who ate a carrot in 1860 has since died.

Everyone who ate a carrot today will at some point in the future die.

Therefore eating carrots will cause you to die, don't eat carrots.

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FLcracker94
your a dumbass who doesn't seem to know what he is talking about

 

please stop leading others astray with your idiocy

 

...Mine is perfectly fine, and its been out of water for a couple seconds. Its not like I'm saying keep it out for a long time. Geeze.

 

Just FYI.. I expose this sponge to air on a weekly basis. The only real precaution I take is making sure I remove and air bubbles that may be attached to it afterwards.

 

The "no air rule" does not apply to ALL sponges. Both this and a red tree sponge I had dealt with air exposure and had no ill effects.

 

I had a tree sponge, so there you go. Mine was perfectly fine. and, I made sure to allways rub it when it touches air. Maybe you should do your research.

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ReadyReefer

IMO one of the best ways to decide if something is good for an animal is to consider its native habitat.

 

is it exposed to air in nature: no

will exposing it to air kill it: maybe not

is exposing it to air good for it: almost certainly not

 

just my .02

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FLcracker94

but, those are just from those peoples experince. you have to remember, everything isn't the same. One person might be able to keep a lionfish, and say you'll never be stung, but then another person will say different.

 

Just because one person says the sponge will die, doesn't mean all of them will die.

 

Icenine has a good point.

 

edit: readyreefer has a point in that last post too.

 

exposing to air isn't good, but it might not kill it, you never know.

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okay its like feeding dogs chocolate some will die but some wont, are oyu gonna purposfuly feed a dog something that might kill it?, its the same thing with sponges

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FLcracker94

I wouldn't give a dog chocolate, and its not like I'm going to take the sponge out alot, just when once wont do any harm (taking it out of the bag) You'll probebly do more harm to all of your tank than just the sponge if you let the store water get in.

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  • 5 months later...
okay its like feeding dogs chocolate some will die but some wont, are oyu gonna purposfuly feed a dog something that might kill it?, its the same thing with sponges

 

 

 

 

Better be safe than sorry, IMO.

There are many risks with keeping corals/sponges etc. I would just take all the care possible and minimize those risks even if they're minuscule.

 

Nice sponges in those pics!

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I got it at a reef store in my area.

 

Right. And would that happen to be in Southern California by any chance? If so where and do you know if they have more? If not do you know if they have a net presence?

 

Thanks.

 

FH2

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fishhead2, just like my user profile says, I'm in Toronto, Canada.

They don't have a website, and it probably wouldn't be a good idea to ship Toronto to SoCal.

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