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choosing the proper setup


schegini14

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Hello all,

 

I am new to the forum. I am trying to decide whether to start with a JBJ 24 gallon tank or starting with a 20 gallon tank with lighting, pumps, filters etc... What do you guys or gals use in your set-up. Does the smartpaq satallite lunar light work well?

 

Thanks,

Sherwin

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nanotrigger
Hello all,

 

I am new to the forum. I am trying to decide whether to start with a JBJ 24 gallon tank or starting with a 20 gallon tank with lighting, pumps, filters etc... What do you guys or gals use in your set-up. Does the smartpaq satallite lunar light work well?

 

Thanks,

Sherwin

 

get the JBJ if your a beginner. it's all in one. you don't have to worry about lighting or filter.

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I like a standard tank over the all in ones. Price difference is negligable but a standard tank, light, filter set can be set up right initally without the need for upgrades. And the equipment can be moved and used on other tanks in the future.

 

The Satalite is a nice light and the orbit is slightly better, both are better than standard "cube" lighting.

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And the equipment can be moved and used on other tanks in the future.

 

 

I don't think that statement makes sense - with the exception of the small bit of work to unscrew the lighting component (which could be used as a retrofit kit - although of somewhat pitiful performance), any component of an all in one can be easily removed and used in other tanks.

 

The standard tank is usually a bit cheaper, depending on how much you do to it. The biggest differences are the amount of work you have to put into the system and the aesthetics of the system. With a standard tank, you have to choose all the components, where they go, and how they'll work in your system. In an all in one, you just redo a few things - usually the lighting and pump.

 

The other aspect of all in one systems is that they have very nice aesthetics - you don't see any equipment in the tank. For a standard tank, that means overflows and sumps to hide equipment and wiring. If you don't mind seeing the heater in the display, then it doesn't matter.

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I also heard from that the JBJ are proned to cracking is that true?

 

Not anymore. They fixed the problem a while back, so any NCs with a relatively new date on the back don't have the cracking problem.

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I ended up buying a 24 aquapod instead. I bought a stand also but the aquapod sticks out an inch on both sides. Do you guys think it would be a problem?

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You mean the left and right edges of the tank are not on the stand? That could cause problems with flexing and such. I would get a stand that the tank fits properly.

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I ended up buying a 24 aquapod instead. I bought a stand also but the aquapod sticks out an inch on both sides. Do you guys think it would be a problem?

 

I'm not sure, but I wouldn't want to risk it. If you do nothing else, at least check to make sure the tank is perfectly level. That'll at least give it the best chance of not cracking from the odd weight distribution.

 

 

If you're set on that particular stand, you could get a sheet of plywood or MDF, and cut out the exact footprint of the tank (outside edges - the weight needs to be on the edges of the tank, not the glass bottom), and put that under it. That would distribute the weight better for the tank and, with some black paint, wouldn't look bad.

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I mean from front to back. The piece of plywood ideal sounds great. The stupid thing about this whole situation is I thought I can save a 100 dollars bygetting a stand from target. The stand ended up fitting perfectly but after completing the stand I felt that it was not sturdy and not strong enough to hold the weight. This is probably a stupid question but What is the average weight of a 24 gallon aquapod with water, rocks, sand and etc...?

 

I have all the rock, sand, and the water already. I just dont feel like putting everything togeather tonight and deciding tomorow to get a new stand. Also how long will the rocks survive for if they aren't in water?

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strangelove

Get 24g, Aquapod is great, I started with a 12g and was really happy with. I hope your not squeamish about spending money on your aquarium because if your worried about spending money now than you're in for a doozy. If you don't like buying stuff for your nano reef and critters you might want to go with koi or goldfish. To keep a healthy reef you will be putting a lot of time and money into this endeavor. What do you plan on keeping in your tank?

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I mean from front to back. The piece of plywood ideal sounds great. The stupid thing about this whole situation is I thought I can save a 100 dollars bygetting a stand from target. The stand ended up fitting perfectly but after completing the stand I felt that it was not sturdy and not strong enough to hold the weight. This is probably a stupid question but What is the average weight of a 24 gallon aquapod with water, rocks, sand and etc...?

 

I have all the rock, sand, and the water already. I just dont feel like putting everything togeather tonight and deciding tomorow to get a new stand. Also how long will the rocks survive for if they aren't in water?

 

 

strangelove - I don't think trying to save money is being squeamish. I'm always looking for deals, used equipment, and sales, as well as cheaper ways to do things (I'm currently working on a custom aquarium and taking wood from junk cabinets and flooring to build the stand). I credit my ability to find things on sale as the only reason I can afford this hobby.

 

 

 

Back on topic: you're looking at 300 pounds or so for everything (I probably overestimated a bit). If its a closed cabinet-style, you can sure it up a bit with some scrap 2x4, since you'll need some plywood anyway ;)

 

The rocks will be fine overnight (or likely a few days) as long as you wrap them in wet newspaper. You'll just have a bit more die off, and a stronger cycle.

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Get 24g, Aquapod is great, I started with a 12g and was really happy with. I hope your not squeamish about spending money on your aquarium because if your worried about spending money now than you're in for a doozy. If you don't like buying stuff for your nano reef and critters you might want to go with koi or goldfish. To keep a healthy reef you will be putting a lot of time and money into this endeavor. What do you plan on keeping in your tank?

 

I dont mind spending the money. The problem I have is that for three pieces of wood it costs over 100 dollars. I could probably build my own stand for less then 20 dollars. Too bad im just lazy. Thats what I think kicks you in the a$$... When It comes to buying fish I will have no problem spending the money becuase that is well worth it to me. this is probably the cheap hobby after you get your tank running. In my other hobby I spend over 500 dollars just trying to get a pair of something.

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if you catch the bug and start wanting larger systems etc it ends up being very expensive. If I were you I would at least put the rock in a plastic garbage can with saltwater just to help keep things alive. To me it is a lot of fun just seeing what new things grow from the rock, plants and animals and corals. But every day out of water means less and less life can survive.

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I don't think that statement makes sense - with the exception of the small bit of work to unscrew the lighting component (which could be used as a retrofit kit - although of somewhat pitiful performance), any component of an all in one can be easily removed and used in other tanks.

 

The standard tank is usually a bit cheaper, depending on how much you do to it. The biggest differences are the amount of work you have to put into the system and the aesthetics of the system. With a standard tank, you have to choose all the components, where they go, and how they'll work in your system. In an all in one, you just redo a few things - usually the lighting and pump.

 

The other aspect of all in one systems is that they have very nice aesthetics - you don't see any equipment in the tank. For a standard tank, that means overflows and sumps to hide equipment and wiring. If you don't mind seeing the heater in the display, then it doesn't matter.

 

A standard nano tank set up is pretty stariaght forward. 20 gal AGA tank, AC 70 or 110 HOB filter with the heater inside, and something like the Satalite 130W PC light. The HOB and light can be used on almost any tank, just move it. The 20 gal tank can be used as a sump for a larger system. I quess the All in Ones have the advantage of having a lame light and pump left over to use on another tank after you upgrade.

 

Aesthetics are a personal opion, I like an open top standard tank setup better myself.

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strangelove
strangelove - I don't think trying to save money is being squeamish. I'm always looking for deals, used equipment, and sales, as well as cheaper ways to do things (I'm currently working on a custom aquarium and taking wood from junk cabinets and flooring to build the stand). I credit my ability to find things on sale as the only reason I can afford this hobby.

Back on topic: you're looking at 300 pounds or so for everything (I probably overestimated a bit). If its a closed cabinet-style, you can sure it up a bit with some scrap 2x4, since you'll need some plywood anyway ;)

 

The rocks will be fine overnight (or likely a few days) as long as you wrap them in wet newspaper. You'll just have a bit more die off, and a stronger cycle.

 

I agree with you, DIY is the way to go, and people like you are sly enough to make things work, I've always worked on the hand me down premise myself. But when I look back and figure how much I actually spent on my 12g Nano, phew. Thing is I went into reefing knowing that I would be spending a lot more than I ever did with a freshwater tank. Livestock for instance, yeah you can get $20 corals, but the nice ones can go up to $100. My problem was always, wandering into a LFS and seeing something that I wanted in my tank, not knowing how to take care of it first and buying a bunch of useless stuff. Took me a year to get off of that bad habit, and I've seen a lot of people in the same predicament. So I just like to forewarn people and let them know what they are in for. Building a reef tank over time slowly is really the only way to make this hobby affordable. It's the ones that jump into it, getting this and that, trying this and that, and ultimately changing tank setups that get into trouble. Not to discourage anyone, but reading info here in forums is an excellent way to do your research first.

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I agree with you, DIY is the way to go, and people like you are sly enough to make things work, I've always worked on the hand me down premise myself. But when I look back and figure how much I actually spent on my 12g Nano, phew. Thing is I went into reefing knowing that I would be spending a lot more than I ever did with a freshwater tank. Livestock for instance, yeah you can get $20 corals, but the nice ones can go up to $100. My problem was always, wandering into a LFS and seeing something that I wanted in my tank, not knowing how to take care of it first and buying a bunch of useless stuff. Took me a year to get off of that bad habit, and I've seen a lot of people in the same predicament. So I just like to forewarn people and let them know what they are in for. Building a reef tank over time slowly is really the only way to make this hobby affordable. It's the ones that jump into it, getting this and that, trying this and that, and ultimately changing tank setups that get into trouble. Not to discourage anyone, but reading info here in forums is an excellent way to do your research first.

 

I agree completely - couldn't have stated it better.

 

Patience and research are definitely the keys to a nice reef tank (and hopefully a relatively cheap one).

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strangelove
I dont mind spending the money. The problem I have is that for three pieces of wood it costs over 100 dollars. I could probably build my own stand for less then 20 dollars. Too bad im just lazy. Thats what I think kicks you in the a$$... When It comes to buying fish I will have no problem spending the money becuase that is well worth it to me. this is probably the cheap hobby after you get your tank running. In my other hobby I spend over 500 dollars just trying to get a pair of something.

 

By no means am I trying to discourage you, sorry if thats how it sounded. Aquarium stands can be pretty expensive for what they are, like you said three pieces of wood. What I did with my Nano is I got a cool looking table from a local thrift store solid wood and ok finish on it, I refinished it with a dark wood stain. My tank was a little low on the table so I found a nice wooden drawer with dovetail joints, stained that the same color as the table, turned it upside down and had a really unique looking stand for my Nano. So if you use your imagination you can find some really cool stuff for your tank. I think tanks incorporated with furniture look much better than free standing tanks in a room anyways. So use what you have, find good deals, and by all means keep on keeping on.

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A standard nano tank set up is pretty stariaght forward. 20 gal AGA tank, AC 70 or 110 HOB filter with the heater inside, and something like the Satalite 130W PC light. The HOB and light can be used on almost any tank, just move it. The 20 gal tank can be used as a sump for a larger system. I quess the All in Ones have the advantage of having a lame light and pump left over to use on another tank after you upgrade.

 

Aesthetics are a personal opion, I like an open top standard tank setup better myself.

 

*cough cough* - Look at his lighting!

:lol:

 

Those pumps are good for mixing saltwater too!

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*cough cough* I did, 72 watts is fine for a 10 gal but it was taken from a cracked 24G Nanocube. All in Ones keep looking better? Atleast we agree on the best use for the pumps.

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*cough cough* I did, 72 watts is fine for a 10 gal but it was taken from a cracked 24G Nanocube. All in Ones keep looking better? Atleast we agree on the best use for the pumps.

 

 

No one said you can't downsize - some people go bigger, some go smaller. The point is he took stock NC lighting, and reused it on another tank. ;)

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No one said you can't downsize - some people go bigger, some go smaller. The point is he took stock NC lighting, and reused it on another tank. ;)

 

If he reused the stock lighting on a smaller tank he had to retro fit the system into a canope or fluoresent strip light or something of that nature. I guess I still dont make sense, but moving a 130w Satalite fixture to a 10, 15 or 20 is easier (no retrofit required) and its almost twice the light. Please correct me if I am wrong, but I was under the impression that in reefing more light is better than less light.

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If he reused the stock lighting on a smaller tank he had to retro fit the system into a canope or fluoresent strip light or something of that nature. I guess I still dont make sense, but moving a 130w Satalite fixture to a 10, 15 or 20 is easier (no retrofit required) and its almost twice the light. Please correct me if I am wrong, but I was under the impression that in reefing more light is better than less light.

 

 

No, you make sense. But for the second straight post, you're putting words into my...typing. I never argued that less light was better - it's obviously not. I never argued that moving a fixture was harder than ripping out stock cube lighting - it's obviously not. What I argued was that the components could be used for other projects - which they can, and obviously have.

 

This is my exact statement on the components, and specifically lighting:

with the exception of the small bit of work to unscrew the lighting component (which could be used as a retrofit kit - although of somewhat pitiful performance), any component of an all in one can be easily removed and used in other tanks.
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