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can someone id this 8 legged guy?


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#1
jessica888

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Hi so i found this guy on the beach, is he ok to have in my nano?
looks harmless but what would i know...
also found a blue slug and some snails, i couldnt get a photo of the slug though he slipped under a rock soon as threw him in. ill try to get one at some stage
thanks

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#2
joshik

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Hi so i found this guy on the beach, is he ok to have in my nano?
looks harmless but what would i know...
also found a blue slug and some snails, i couldnt get a photo of the slug though he slipped under a rock soon as threw him in. ill try to get one at some stage
thanks

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looks like a seastar . some seastars are harmless but i'm not sure about this variety.

#3
jessica888

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looks like a seastar . some seastars are harmless but i'm not sure about this variety.


thanks, i tried googling but i cant seem to find anything even similar. i did read some pages which said sea stars can feed on corals - doesnt sound good. not sure if i want to run the risk...

#4
Dendroguy

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looks like a sun star, NOT reef safe they will plow your corals and eat your snails plus they get huge fast
edit: where is the beach?

Edited by Dendroguy, 11 March 2012 - 05:34 AM.

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#5
Formula462

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why are you taking #### from the beach when you don't even know what the hell they are?

I swear some people man.

ps. that scooter dragonette is going to starve out in your tank.

#6
Atela

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Something to keep in mind is, what you introduce into your tank from the beach, WILL come with unwanted bacteria. The oceans params are going to be different from what your tank may be. The tides produce different water flow than what your tank has. Hence making it difficult for the 'ocean finds' to thrive. You have added a starfish that might just devour your corals and sponges. The slug could be a nudibranch of some sort. Also not good for certain corals. It is best to research the particular animal before adding to your tank.

TO Formula462: Apparently jessica888 is as new as you and I were when we first starting into this hobby.

Also, please tell us how her Scooter Dragonette is going to starve out in her tank. I'm curious.

Edited by Atela, 11 March 2012 - 03:24 PM.

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#7
Formula462

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Something to keep in mind is, what you introduce into your tank from the beach, WILL come with unwanted bacteria. The oceans params are going to be different from what your tank may be. The tides produce different water flow than what your tank has. Hence making it difficult for the 'ocean finds' to thrive. You have added a starfish that might just devour your corals and sponges. The slug could be a nudibranch of some sort. Also not good for certain corals. It is best to research the particular animal before adding to your tank.

TO Formula462: Apparently jessica888 is as new as you and I were when we first starting into this hobby.

Also, please tell us how her Scooter Dragonette is going to starve out in her tank. I'm curious.


Basically I was being a dick. It mostly stems from the fact we live in the internet age and I feel this should be common knowledge at this point. I was a noob at one point yes, but I always knew better than to poach the beach for sea life.

Unless that dragonette is frozen trained, and I hope it is, it will surely die in a tank of such immaturity. Without a refugium to churn out those pods, he is going to run out of food eventually. It sucks but it's true.

#8
Atela

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Basically I was being a dick. It mostly stems from the fact we live in the internet age and I feel this should be common knowledge at this point. I was a noob at one point yes, but I always knew better than to poach the beach for sea life.

Unless that dragonette is frozen trained, and I hope it is, it will surely die in a tank of such immaturity. Without a refugium to churn out those pods, he is going to run out of food eventually. It sucks but it's true.

You've been on my mind the whole time that I did my water change tonight. You were a tad bit strong there! Some of us read on the internet that some vendors sell ocean harvested animals, therefor making it seem that anyone who comes across sea life would be able to do the same. Not everyone is aware that a license is required to do such. And even those who do have licenses don't always follow the rules closely about over harvesting. That irks me.

Granted we do live in the internet age, but some of us don't always get a chance to find everything we need to know. That is why new hobbyists come to forums like this. They don't come here the be berated by folks that seem to have a tude about ignorance.

I think that you have opened up an area of which jessica could use some friendly detailed advice regarding the dragonette. Maybe post some links explaining what you are talking about. I too was unaware that starvation would come to that type of fish with a special diet. If she does not have a refugium, what would you suggest that she use as a frozen food supplement? As a new reefer, these are important things that she needs to know.
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#9
matty0206

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You've been on my mind the whole time that I did my water change tonight. You were a tad bit strong there! Some of us read on the internet that some vendors sell ocean harvested animals, therefor making it seem that anyone who comes across sea life would be able to do the same. Not everyone is aware that a license is required to do such. And even those who do have licenses don't always follow the rules closely about over harvesting. That irks me.

Granted we do live in the internet age, but some of us don't always get a chance to find everything we need to know. That is why new hobbyists come to forums like this. They don't come here the be berated by folks that seem to have a tude about ignorance.

I think that you have opened up an area of which jessica could use some friendly detailed advice regarding the dragonette. Maybe post some links explaining what you are talking about. I too was unaware that starvation would come to that type of fish with a special diet. If she does not have a refugium, what would you suggest that she use as a frozen food supplement? As a new reefer, these are important things that she needs to know.


All I could see in my head while reading this was my dad lecturing me when I was a kid. :lol: Not judging, just an observation.

I think his point was to not ask after the fact. Ask then go back and get the sea star if it's found to be ok. As far as the dragonette goes....he was being a dick :huh:

#10
Koston

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You've been on my mind the whole time that I did my water change tonight. You were a tad bit strong there! Some of us read on the internet that some vendors sell ocean harvested animals, therefor making it seem that anyone who comes across sea life would be able to do the same. Not everyone is aware that a license is required to do such. And even those who do have licenses don't always follow the rules closely about over harvesting. That irks me.

Granted we do live in the internet age, but some of us don't always get a chance to find everything we need to know. That is why new hobbyists come to forums like this. They don't come here the be berated by folks that seem to have a tude about ignorance.

I think that you have opened up an area of which jessica could use some friendly detailed advice regarding the dragonette. Maybe post some links explaining what you are talking about. I too was unaware that starvation would come to that type of fish with a special diet. If she does not have a refugium, what would you suggest that she use as a frozen food supplement? As a new reefer, these are important things that she needs to know.


No offense, I feel like you're being a little too kind. When you're putting something in your tank or when you are buying/receiving/obtaining any type of new pet, it is common knowledge to do some research first. This girl literally grabbed stuff out of the ocean and threw it into her tank without knowing what it was. I'm like 90% sure that is a sun star, not a starfish, or something that is definitely not reef-safe and will gobble up any corals she has in there. I'm also willing to put a bet there her cute blue slug is a not reef-safe nudibranch. So what to do from here... she's going to realize she needs to get rid of that star, which is a beautiful creature, and now it has a serious chance of dying. Who knows if she even acclimated it to her tank, which has extremely different parameters than the ocean? Is she even close to the beach, how long will it take for her to get it back to the ocean? It has a pretty decent chance of dying shock from the transportation/different water parameters in such a short period of time.

As for the dragonette, it may also be safe to say that she does absolutely no research before putting livestock into her tank. Perhaps she has no idea how damn hard it is to keep a dragonette in a nano tank, or any tank for that matter. People with 100g+ tanks sometimes have a hard time keeping them because they are known to be one of the most finnicky eaters when it comes to nanoreef livestock.
Read here for more information on dragonettes and how hard they are to keep alive in a tank. http://www.nano-reef...howtopic=161389
Maybe she has a bangin' pod population for the mandarin to eat where he can't actually attack where they are reproducing from, so hopefully she has a 'fuge of them. Maybe it's trained to eat frozen foods... but then again, she may not do the proper research on animals before she buys them or puts them into her tank... so who knows?

Honestly, when it comes to livestock, at least for me the #1 rule is to research before you buy or you risk killing off these beautiful creatures. End of story. The fact that she is just plucking random animals out of the ocean not knowing if they can even survive in her tank is just... not right. At least to me.

Perhaps I'm way overreacting and making a fool of myself but I think she needs to read and browse the forums and the basics of reefkeeping before she dives into the hobby any further. Sorry for being such an ass but these are just my opinions, I'm sure someone feels the same way. I'm a nice person and I have nothing against her on a personal level, I'm just kind of...stating the obvious.
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#11
joshik

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Something to keep in mind is, what you introduce into your tank from the beach, WILL come with unwanted bacteria. The oceans params are going to be different from what your tank may be. The tides produce different water flow than what your tank has. Hence making it difficult for the 'ocean finds' to thrive. You have added a starfish that might just devour your corals and sponges. The slug could be a nudibranch of some sort. Also not good for certain corals. It is best to research the particular animal before adding to your tank.

TO Formula462: Apparently jessica888 is as new as you and I were when we first starting into this hobby.

Also, please tell us how her Scooter Dragonette is going to starve out in her tank. I'm curious.


aren't the stuff we have in our tanks 'ocean finds'...just that we didnt find them?

i have caught my own fish and even have brought home tons of hermits, snails, shrimps, etc from tide pools in hawaii.... they do great in my tank. BUT it is a good idea to know what you are putting in your tank before you do so.

#12
not_so_nano

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Who knows if she even acclimated it to her tank, which has extremely different parameters than the ocean? Is she even close to the beach, how long will it take for her to get it back to the ocean? It has a pretty decent chance of dying shock from the transportation/different water parameters in such a short period of time.


Is this not what we do when we go to the LFS or order online since most of the fish in the marine trade are wild caught ? Her even being an hour from the beach gives it a better chance of survival than ordering it or buying it and not having it work out....

Collection of these kinds of species, unless they have a specific harvest season or are protected, are able to be collected if you have a regular fishing license in most states. That applies to corals also. How do you know she does not have a fishing license ? If she chose to, she could have taken every peice of sea life she seen that wasnt protected or had a specific season, put it in a bucket and buried it in the backyard when she got home and it is perfectly legal if she had a fishing license !

Should she have done some research first ? Yes for sure ! But how many times when you were new to the hobby did you just purchase something that didnt work out or was a bad idea simply on impulse ? You live, you learn, you dont do it again. Imagine how hard the impulse would be to resist if you seen it free on the beach ?

#13
NewZealandReefie

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I feel like you're being a little too kind.


This.

You ####ed up.

Don't bring things home THEN ask what they are, that's potentially cruel and irresponsible behavior.

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#14
gabe_j

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sorry regardless of her proximity to the ocean it would be even more irresponsible to bring the livestock back the ocean. if she has contaminated them with non native pathogens and releases the animals its possible to spawn the spread of invasive bacterial, viral, or fungal pathogens into her local beach. which leaves the only real option of disposing of these animals (which were obviously harvested in an inappropriate manner) is to freeze them so they die. giving them away, selling them, trading, or releasing the critters is now completely out of the equation. i think formula's points were not harsh. she is/was being very irresponsible in the treatment of the animals she poached. and the only answer now is to kill them. except the scooter that guy could probably be sold or traded but i'd still advise against it because you don't know what it has been introduced to in terms of pathogens. her best case is to set up a rubble mound and add a bag of pods to seed the tank and or start feeding arctic pods or tiger pods to keep the guy fed.

Edited by gabe_j, 12 March 2012 - 08:14 AM.

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#15
Koston

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Is this not what we do when we go to the LFS or order online since most of the fish in the marine trade are wild caught ? Her even being an hour from the beach gives it a better chance of survival than ordering it or buying it and not having it work out....

Collection of these kinds of species, unless they have a specific harvest season or are protected, are able to be collected if you have a regular fishing license in most states. That applies to corals also. How do you know she does not have a fishing license ? If she chose to, she could have taken every peice of sea life she seen that wasnt protected or had a specific season, put it in a bucket and buried it in the backyard when she got home and it is perfectly legal if she had a fishing license !

Should she have done some research first ? Yes for sure ! But how many times when you were new to the hobby did you just purchase something that didnt work out or was a bad idea simply on impulse ? You live, you learn, you dont do it again. Imagine how hard the impulse would be to resist if you seen it free on the beach ?


I can't tell if you're joking or not or trying to get attention... Of course she Can take things out of the ocean and kill them for fun. But we are on a reef forum and and we believe in taking care of our animals, sustaining their health, researching before you buy, and most of all being responsible. None of us here want to take a starfish out of the ocean and kill it for fun, I dont know about you. You worded your argument like a child... You also missed the point of my post. It's common sense to research any pet before you buy it. A responsible adult does this. I don't remember buying a bunch of crazy fish and throwing them into my old 10g. Researching this forum for 30 minutes will tell you that is wrong and irresponsible. I'm just saying. Maybe people are defending her because I'm being a harsh ##### but in the world of reef keeping what she did was cruel. At least to me. Responsibility is a big part of reef keeping and life in general, sorry?

Edited by Koston, 12 March 2012 - 08:05 AM.

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#16
Atela

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This.

You ####ed up.

Don't bring things home THEN ask what they are, that's potentially cruel and irresponsible behavior.

I may have been a bit gentle, but I see no reason to be dick headed and not give the OP a good explanation of why we shouldn't do our own harvesting without prior research. Jessica hasn't been back to this thread yet. I hope that she wasn't turned off by the strong reply.

To Koston: You aren't over reacting or making a fool of yourself, or being an ass for that matter. Your reply states important facts without being "dick headed"!

Edited by Atela, 12 March 2012 - 10:03 AM.

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#17
Koston

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sorry regardless of her proximity to the ocean it would be even more irresponsible to bring the livestock back the ocean. if she has contaminated them with non native pathogens and releases the animals its possible to spawn the spread of invasive bacterial, viral, or fungal pathogens into her local beach. which leaves the only real option of disposing of these animals (which were obviously harvested in an inappropriate manner) is to freeze them so they die. giving them away, selling them, trading, or releasing the critters is now completely out of the equation. i think formula's points were not harsh. she is/was being very irresponsible in the treatment of the animals she poached. and the only answer now is to kill them. except the scooter that guy could probably be sold or traded but i'd still advise against it because you don't know what it has been introduced to in terms of pathogens. her best case is to set up a rubble mound and add a bag of pods to seed the tank and or start feeding arctic pods or tiger pods to keep the guy fed.


I'm glad this was posted because now everyone can see that if she doesn't want these creatures (which she probably won't when she finds out they are not reef safe), they have to be killed. They cannot be released back into the ocean or traded. So in my opinion she committed an act of cruelty and completely ignored the basics of reefkeeping... and if she doesn't know the minimal basics of reefkeeping, it's not time to have a reef just quite yet... oh well.
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#18
darkshiara

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I'm glad this was posted because now everyone can see that if she doesn't want these creatures (which she probably won't when she finds out they are not reef safe), they have to be killed. They cannot be released back into the ocean or traded. So in my opinion she committed an act of cruelty and completely ignored the basics of reefkeeping... and if she doesn't know the minimal basics of reefkeeping, it's not time to have a reef just quite yet... oh well.


+1
I don't think you were harsh at all. You don't go out in the woods and grab random animals and bring them back home because in a domestic setting they aren't safe... same thing with you don't go to the beach and grab stuff that belongs in the sea and try to cram it into your tank ESPECIALLY not knowing what you are doing or what the animal is. It's not only irresponsible, it sounds kind of cheap.

It's one thing to be a professional reefer or know exactly what you are bringing home. It's another thing to go grab something off the beach and post it on a forum and ask what it is.

#19
lakshwadeep

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I would just like to add that while collecting some marine animals is legal (after you've checked all the laws and possible permits), you need to also take into account the habitat where you're collecting from. Most members on this site are from the US, and the US west coast and much of the east coast (except near Florida) are temperate, not tropical, waters. So, such livestock, most notably catalina gobies, are not suited for tropical reef tanks, often suffering shortened lifespans. If you are still interested, you might consider setting up a temperate ("coldwater") tank.

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#20
NanoCuber1

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looks like a sun star, NOT reef safe they will plow your corals and eat your snails plus they get huge fast
edit: where is the beach?

Are you trying to make yourself look stupid? He is in CA, why would there be a reef-dwelling sun-star? Check your facts first, bud.

#21
gabe_j

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who said she was from cali?
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Something smells fishy.

you called?

go rectal or go home ;)


#22
mbonus

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who said she was from cali?



Based upon the time zone in her profile, I would guess Australia

#23
Formula462

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First off, let me say thanks to those who didn't lose their cool like me; those who remained level headed in their chastising. Second, let me say thanks to those who understand my angst and annoyance with such an easily avoidable scenario. I feel it just shouldn't happen in today's day and age.

I will admit that I was being a little harsh, but what I said stands. I am well aware about the collection of species from the wild to be sold in the retail market. That is regulated (supposed to be) and we at least know the living condition, diet, behaviors, etc of the species we collect. Hopefully aquaculturing will come full circle in the next few years and we will have access to much more tank raised species. In the meantime, we need to exercise as much conservation and self control as possible.

The main reason I was angry is because the star will more than likely die either in her tank or when she tries to take it back out. Not to mention as someone already did, she CAN'T let it go again as it may be contaminated now. The dragonette will more than likely die, and the nudi will more than likely eat coral (like he is supposed to) and the be taken out and killed. This is all assuming the tank even has a future. We may have permanently scared her away. But if she is gonna turn out to be yet another, yuk-yuk that crams whatever they feel like in their little glass box with a blatant disregard for her natural and artificial habitat, then good riddance I say.

But still, sometimes I have bad days and yell. I apologize.

#24
Formula462

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I just got to thinking. That, "but what would I know?", comment seems like bait. Could this be troll?

#25
mbonus

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I don't think she's a troll, I saw her other thread in the beginner section.

Synopsis; she got the tank free from a friend and is just trying to figure stuff out. Having received a fully established system in some ways is more difficult because you haven't had the time to do the research while things develop.

If she comes back, now she knows the implications.