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Pansy?


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#1
johnmaloney

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Anyone keep a sea pansy before? Renilla reniformis (google has pics) If so, any tips on getting it to burrow? Should I help it, or let the stem go in naturally? Is it okay to tie him? I dont think I would glue him down...well any tips would be appreciated.

#2
ajmckay

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What did you call me?!?!



HAhaha... Actually I have no clue. I would have figured that you're probably one of the people most likely to have a clue... Does look quite interesting, but I've never seen one before.

Edited by ajmckay, 24 January 2011 - 07:09 PM.


#3
paneubert

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I just think it is cool that it glows......

Posted Image




oh, panoob. You make anything sound reasonable.


#4
jeremai

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They're not often available to hobbyists. They're also only partially photosynthetic, and gain most of their nutritional needs from particulate feeding. You could probably be fine keeping one in a system dedicated to nonphotosynthetic corals, but then, there are much more attractive species for that sort of a set up.

pretty sure jer was referring to the length

 
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#5
johnmaloney

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lol...

first time keeping one, he is a little more mobile than expected I guess. Never seen them loose and about before, but I guess I would have overlooked them, but this guy just kind of bobs around with his stem down, but not buried at all. Deep enough in his area, it is deeper than he is long at least...

They're not often available to hobbyists. They're also only partially photosynthetic, and gain most of their nutritional needs from particulate feeding. You could probably be fine keeping one in a system dedicated to nonphotosynthetic corals, but then, there are much more attractive species for that sort of a set up.


cool, i didnt realize they were photosynthetic at all. it is curiosity tank more than a display. they look pretty cool I think, (when buried), but yeah there are more colorful things

I just think it is cool that it glows......


I havent seen it yet

Edited by johnmaloney, 24 January 2011 - 10:39 PM.


#6
thesmallerthebetter

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wanna get a few more and add them to site? id buy :P

seriously tho....im about to place a CUC order in the next few days....throw one up on the site for me haha

Edited by thesmallerthebetter, 24 January 2011 - 08:42 PM.


#7
johnmaloney

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i think he may have settled in, he found a spot hidden around the corner where you can barely see him lol...

#8
jeremai

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yeah, they're related to sea pens, so behavior is probably similar. shoulda taken some pics before he hid away. :P

pretty sure jer was referring to the length

 
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#9
johnmaloney

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he is out and about again..lol...so much for settling in, I guess 10 minutes was jumping the gun a bit. :) He looked cozy though...I will snap a pic of him later on when the lights come on...most likely....:)

edit -hey flash works...I moved him to the front, he was too far back and roaming to get a pic, but you cant see his tentacles here. when he calms down I will have to grab a shot of them, it looks cool. Anyway here he is:

Posted Image


must be a blue moon...lol..


He can become neutrally bouyant if he wants to is the issue, he moves on the current a bit when he moves, or at least that is what it looks like. I swear they stay put in the wild... I mapped a few out last night, in a week I will check to see if they are in the same spot. If they are, I will see what I am doing wrong, if not I will at least feel better about it. :)

Edited by johnmaloney, 26 January 2011 - 01:18 PM.


#10
Monochrome5

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Worked with these guys in lab today. They bioluminesce if you touch them. It's a predation response (the flash confuses predators). For what it's worth, it's one big ass polyp with a bunch of specialized polyps attached to it, essentially controlling the basal polyp. Some of them feed, some produce gametes, and some pump water into and out of the basal polyp to move the colony around. They don't like a lot of flow (from what I've seen) and have very little photosynthetic ability, if any at all. Feed them like you would an anemone, since they're basically a colonial nem. Small mysis and filter foods work great.

Edited by Monochrome5, 28 January 2011 - 01:44 PM.

Reef tanks are like race cars - they're flashy, expensive, and the faster you go the harder you crash.

 

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#11
johnmaloney

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thank you I appreciate the tips! I have been feeding a fine dry mix and I am pretty sure it is a feeding response rather than a stress response i am seeing. He does seem to stay towards the back of the tank that has less flow, certainly doesnt like it up front where there is a lot of flow.

I kind of want to see it glow, but I dont want to stress it. How tough are they? simple touch will do?

Edited by johnmaloney, 02 February 2011 - 06:07 PM.


#12
TinyGiant

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this thing sorta creeps me out

looks like the end result of a Mrs. Bobbet situation or a weiner cross section

lol


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#13
Monochrome5

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thank you I appreciate the tips! I have been feeding a fine dry mix and I am pretty response rather than a stress response i am seeing. He does seem to stay towards the back of the tank that has less flow, certainly doesnt like it up front where there is a lot of flow.

I kind of want to see it glow, but I dont want to stress it. How tough are they? simple touch will do?


They are actually pretty tough. A firm poke will be fine. Pretend it's the Pillsbury doughboy and let him have it.


... that last sentence was a very odd one to type...

Reef tanks are like race cars - they're flashy, expensive, and the faster you go the harder you crash.

 

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#14
johnmaloney

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ok cool, i might check it out then if i can find him again,...he is in a new spot everyday, bad candidate for captivity i think, but fun to check out.

#15
Monochrome5

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Yeah. They remind me of bettas - low flow, low light, low activity. He probably keeps moving to try and find a spot with little to no flow.

Reef tanks are like race cars - they're flashy, expensive, and the faster you go the harder you crash.

 

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#16
johnmaloney

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ouch... my tank setup is probably all wrong for him. halides with bright white sand to boot.. no wonder he goes to the back...maybe I can build him some cover or put him in one of the other tanks...they are suited for that. I appreciate all this info!

what are you studying if you dont mind me asking?

Edited by johnmaloney, 02 February 2011 - 08:18 PM.


#17
Monochrome5

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My specialty is marine inverts. I have published work on Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, the California purple urchin (well... sort of published. It's under my third peer review right now and should be out in a few months). I also have published work on the Eastern mosquito fish, Gambusia affinis (which is freshwater, but shhhh.... don't tell anyone ;)) I'm a semester away from graduating with my masters in Marine Biology from the College of Charleston. I plan on further education, but I really want to research cnidarians. Right now I'm in a marine invertebrate zoology class, so I'm working with tons of lovely inverts. Last week we played around with aptasia and some other actinaria nems, as well as the pansy and a few clonal and colonial hydroids. Always happy to pass on my invert knowledge. I was actually tempted to bring one home from the lab and do a little pico for him. If it helps, we keep them alive in 500ml petri dishes with no lighting (other than the fluorescents in the ceiling) or waterflow to speak of. Just replace the evap and feed them some phyto every few days.


PS: I recently ordered 8 dwarf ceriths and 10 empty hermit shells for my 8g BC from ya'll. You sent 98329183 ceriths and at least 100 shells... Much obliged good sir. Though it was the snailpocalypse in my tank. My three hermits love the new shells. My dwarf scarlet switched within 15 minutes. My blue switched within an hour... to a cerith's shell. You just can't win with those guys haha. Oh, and the chaeto is doing great as well. Loaded with pods (seriously... they're everywhere!). Can't speak highly enough of your services. My tank is beautiful with the CUC you guys designed for me. I'm definitely going to be picking up some of your freeze dried reef filter food soon. My BC8 is starting to coral up and will be needing some munchies!

Random thread hijaking question - what kind of CUC would you suggest for a 115g "reef"... why the quotes you ask? It has a Valentini puffer in it :) He has successfully eaten my former CUC (6 turbos, 10 dwarf scarlets, 6 nassarius, and two sand sifting stars). He also picks some softies (nothing crazy), but he's content with brine, krill and the occasional star polyp. Right now my CUC is a pair of pencil urchins and a longspine, but they have been less than ideal (the longspine likes to decorate himself with xenia, of all things). I know the ideal would be removing the puffer, but he's been with me a long, long time and is essentially a family member. Think he'd eat the chitons or limpets you guys sell?

Edited by Monochrome5, 02 February 2011 - 10:25 PM.

Reef tanks are like race cars - they're flashy, expensive, and the faster you go the harder you crash.

 

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#18
johnmaloney

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wow a petri dish? I have to rethink petri dishes...i had no clue you can keep animals alive in there, but it makes sense.

lets talk about your tank through email or pm, I dont want to break NR rules etc....and incur the wrathe of jeremai. :)

#19
jeremai

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wait, what? I don't care about threadjacking, not in this case, lol. not only did he use the word 'snailpocalypse', but the guy's a freaking marine biologist. he's ok in my book. :lol:

pretty sure jer was referring to the length

 
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#20
Monochrome5

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Giving a scientist permission to break the rules is a bad, bad idea ;)

Reef tanks are like race cars - they're flashy, expensive, and the faster you go the harder you crash.

 

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#21
johnmaloney

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wait, what? I don't care about threadjacking, not in this case, lol. not only did he use the word 'snailpocalypse', but the guy's a freaking marine biologist. he's ok in my book. :lol:



i just like to give you a hard time when I can. :)

By the way, I have decided this guy is not right for my 40B, he now resides in a low flow pretty boring tank and seems to enjoy it but still moves a bit. Still haven't seen bio-luminescence. He is free to a good home.

#22
Builder Anthony

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Intresting little thing.
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http://www.nano-reef...howtopic=267313

#23
Coprile

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Worked with these guys in lab today. They bioluminesce if you touch them. It's a predation response (the flash confuses predators). For what it's worth, it's one big ass polyp with a bunch of specialized polyps attached to it, essentially controlling the basal polyp. Some of them feed, some produce gametes, and some pump water into and out of the basal polyp to move the colony around. They don't like a lot of flow (from what I've seen) and have very little photosynthetic ability, if any at all. Feed them like you would an anemone, since they're basically a colonial nem. Small mysis and filter foods work great.



I found some sea pansies and Calliactis tricolor hermit crab anemones on the beach two days ago. All of the posts here have been very helpful, but I got a question. What exactly should I feed these guys.. Do you have any suggestions. Are they okay with a reef? I can take care of things I buy from the store cause I always ask the salesman and look up online, but I started two nano tanks with local saltwater life.. and by local I mean trashsonville.. cracksonville.. jacksonville florida. The way I figure if they can survive our nasty waters here they would thrive in a controlled environment.. and also I think they would be better for a nano tank and possible unstable conditions cause thats what they have been living in... Just my little experiment and anything helps. DSC_1021.JPG

Worked with these guys in lab today. They bioluminesce if you touch them. It's a predation response (the flash confuses predators). For what it's worth, it's one big ass polyp with a bunch of specialized polyps attached to it, essentially controlling the basal polyp. Some of them feed, some produce gametes, and some pump water into and out of the basal polyp to move the colony around. They don't like a lot of flow (from what I've seen) and have very little photosynthetic ability, if any at all. Feed them like you would an anemone, since they're basically a colonial nem. Small mysis and filter foods work great.



I found some sea pansies and Calliactis tricolor hermit crab anemones on the beach two days ago. All of the posts here have been very helpful, but I got a question. What exactly should I feed these guys.. Do you have any suggestions. Are they okay with a reef? I can take care of things I buy from the store cause I always ask the salesman and look up online, but I started two nano tanks with local saltwater life.. and by local I mean trashsonville.. cracksonville.. jacksonville florida. The way I figure if they can survive our nasty waters here they would thrive in a controlled environment.. and also I think they would be better for a nano tank and possible unstable conditions cause thats what they have been living in... Just my little experiment and anything helps. DSC_1021.JPG

#24
mmcguffi

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i just like to give you a hard time when I can. :)

By the way, I have decided this guy is not right for my 40B, he now resides in a low flow pretty boring tank and seems to enjoy it but still moves a bit. Still haven't seen bio-luminescence. He is free to a good home.

what was the fate of this little dude?

#25
johnmaloney

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Shipped out awhile ago, not sure to who anymore though....might be worth following up on. They were fairly easy to keep, but moved around a bit, so they didn't work for that display tank I had them in. (I got a second one at some point) I eventually transferred them to a bare bottom tank with little flow in an acrylic cubicle. I used a fine particle meaty food mix of different sizes that I fed to everything in the tank. Ground up fish flake would probably work fine. Better as a curiosity than a regular fish tank inhabitant I think because of all the movement, at least for me.