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Clownfish Information and Pairing Guide


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#1
Tentacles

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I've seen alot of people with random species compatibility questions, pairing questions, and general questions on info. about various clowns, so I thought I'd put this together to try and help anyone out. Hope it ends up helping someone.

I'll try and cover every common species I know of and if I leave any out anyone wants info. on, just tell me and I'll put up what I can. Most of my info. will either come from my personal experiences with my own clowns and clowns I've observed, or from the clownfish bible everyone should own, Clownfishes by Joyce Wilkerson.

For pictures from NR members of each of the Clownfishes listed here, go to the Clownfish Pictures page, page three of this thread. If you have a picture of any not already up, feel free to post it and I will add it to the collection. Thanks.

Amphiprion

True Percula Clownfish:
-Length: Usually 1 to 4 inches, many can be obtained much smaller, and some can grow a bit bigger.
-Recognition: Orange body with black-bordered white vertical stripes along body.
-Species Compatibility: True Percs can live in a social group consisting of several of themselves, or can be paired with themselves, black/onyx percs, and orange or black false percs. Both black true and false percs do exist, true onyx percs are found in the reefs of New Guinnea and Australia, false black percs, the more available black perc, were created mostly in captivity. **See extended explanation below.**
-Breeding note: Most people have seen with experience that the male usually determines the color of the offspring of a pair, so if you have a orange and black pair and want black offspring, try to get a black male.

False Percula Clownfish/ Ocellaris Clownfish:
-Length: usually 3/4inch to 3.5 inches, very similar to true perc length, but are typically a little smaller, and of course both bigger and smaller fish exist.
-Recognition: Very similiar to true percs, obvious difference being the markings on the true percs are slightly darker, and false percs tend to be a tad less territorial than true percs. Spine counts on the dorsal fin also differ with true percs and false percs, if you can get close enough to count them while they are in a tank.
-Species Compatibility: Same as true percs, false percs can pair with either true or false percs, black or orange.

**Onyx or Black True/False Percula Coloration:**
Onyx True Percs and Black False Percs have very different coloration patterns. A black ocellaris/false perc is mostly black with exception to its white vertical stripes, except in the snout, when it is an adult. In some cases even the snout will be black (see page 2) and the clown will be solid black with exception to its stripes, which can have a slight blue hue in them, very pretty. An Onyx True Perc has black coloration in between its vertical stripes, sort of colored in between the lines, see below, and is not fully black. It's belly, fins, face, and tail can and probably will be mostly orange, with some black stripes or highlights, and some do have solid black dorsals and other fins, but the distinction is important for determinig the two and a note for potential buyers, if there is a ''Black Perc'' for sale and is mostly black like a black ocellaris would be, chances are it is not a true perc so don't be fooled into paying the true perc price, seeing that they can sometimes be much more expensive that black ocellaris clowns. Personally, in the current market, I would not pay any more than $40 or $45 for a single black ocellaris, or $80 to ~$100 for a mated pair, but that of course depends on availability, and on your own opinion or value of the fish :), and prices will always be different from different breeders and from different regions, Ex: East Coast Vs. West Coast. In regions where they are more scarce than on the coasts, I have seen them get up to $150 for a pair. True Onyx Percs can fetch a much higher price at times, they are a much rarer fish.

***There are two beautiful pictures of specimens of both the Black Ocellaris/False Percula, and the Onyx True Percula, on the Clownfish Pictures page of this thread. Thanks and credits given to Fewskillz and Cyenna for having such perfect examples of the coloration and details of the darker persuasion of Percs :)***

Tomato Clownfish:
-Length: Up to 5.5 inches.
-Recognition: Adults will have a single white head bar, females will be mainly darker/blackish on sides with redder snout, stomach, and fins. Males will be considerably smaller than females and are more orange than the blacker female. Juveniles will have 2 or 3 white bars, orange.
-Species Compatibility: THEMSELVES. Although my LFS has a freakish Cinnamon/Tomato clownfish pair, this is strongly discouraged.

Cinnamon Clownfish:
-Length: Up to 5 inches.
-Recognition: Very similar to the Tomato, adults will be darker color/blackish with a single white bar behind their head.
-Species Compatibility: THEMSELVES

Clarkii Clownfish:
-Length: Up to 6 inches.
-Recognition: Adults will be darker/blackish on the backside, and become much more orange to light orange on their belly. Typically have 2 white bars.
-Species Compatibility: THEMSELVES

Skunk Clownfishes:
-Length: Pink Skunks: typically up to 4 inches. Orange Skunks: up to 5 inches.
-Recognition: Orange Skunks are bright orange in color and is characterized by no vertical white headband present, but a white stripe that runs down its snout and its back. Pink Skunks unlike the orange, do have a vertical white stripe behind their head and are pink to pink/orange in color.
-Species Compatibility: THEMSELVES. It is possible to pair up a pink and an orange but it isnt reccomended.

Saddleback Clownfish:
-Length: Saddlebacks can max out at about 5 inches, some can go a tad over that, but its not very common in captivity.
-Recognition: Orange/Brown or Dark brown to black body, with a vertical white stripe and a semi-vertical white patch, the stripe being directly behind its eyes, the other stripe/patch occuring near the back part of the dorsal fin, and taking an interesting shape on the back of the fish for which it is named 'Saddleback' because it appears to have a little white saddle. Tail varies in color in photos, some have yellow tails, some have black tails lined with white. Snout is orange.
-Species Compatibility: THEMSELVES.

Sebae Clownfish (or Seba's Clownfish):
-Length: Up to 6 inches.
-Recognition: Usually brown/dark orange fading slightly to belly, with two wide white stripes and an orange head and snout, anal fin is usually yellow, and the tail is light whitish/yellowish.
-Species Compatibility: THEMSELVES.

Premnas

Maroon Clownfish:
-Length: Possibly up to 6 inches, but in captivity more around 5 inches would be max. size.
-Recognition: Very orange body, female will be darker orange, male will be richer brighter orange. Typically will have 3 white or gold stripes, but Ive seen some 2 stripers, so its possible, as is misbars. Both Goldstripe and Whitestripe are widely available, and contrary to some myths, the goldstripe is not a breeded version, it happens naturally in the region of sumatra.
-Species Compatibility: THEMSELVES. Some people think the maroon is the most territorial and hostile fish to pair up, so proceed with caution. Gold stripes can also pair with white stripes without problem, like orange and black percs.

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Tank Sizes: For one very small perc, a 5 gallon tank would suffice, but in most cases 10 gallons would be the typically accepted minimum size, and a pair could be kept in 10 gallons. For a single small maroon, a 10 gallon is possible, but 20 gallons would be reccomended and would work for a pair, and the bigger they get the more room they will need, a 30 gallon would do nicely. For these larger species I'd think 40 or 55 gallons would be the minimum, unless they are on the smaller size, then maybe a 30 gallon, but they too will grow out of that. Open for amending based on anyones personal experiences.

Pairing Techniques
The best all around way to try and pair up two clowns would be to add them in the tank at the same time, so the first order of business can be to decide who is more dominant, and once that happens, territory can be chosen. And, of course, try to make sure there is a significant size difference with the two clowns, its important so that you don't end up with two females that won't stop fighting. If a clown lives in a tank by itself for long enough, even a month, it will ultimately become a female and establish it's own territory, making it harder to introduce a new clown. When your pairing circumstances are these, there are several things to try to ensure a good pair. First, make sure the clown is smaller (but not too much smaller, see ''sizes'' below) than the current clown, you dont want to have two clowns fighting until the end of time. Since the current clown will bully the new arrival, you can try introducing the clown a variety of ways, but the ultimate goal is to provide it a safe haven to return to if it gets beat up way too much. I used a floating spaghetti collander to introduce my small maroon to my original one, and that seemed to work well, they are now an inseperable pair. You can also try making a wall of eggcrate the little one can slip through, or a little cave the little one can hide in, in your rockwork. A different way to try pairing is to take the female out of her element AKA territory, and put them together in a QT tank or a floating collander, or rearrange the rockwork to confuse the female, she wont be as territorial if she doesnt know where her territory is :) .
NOTE: It is good to monitor the new smaller clown to make sure it doesn't take too much of a beating, but don't baby it too much either, the bickering is important so they can establish who is dominant.
NOTE on True/False Percs and Size: Although it is important to have a decent size difference when trying to form a pair, true percula and ocellaris/false percula clowns do not have to have as big a size difference as other clownfish. If you have a 1.5 inch perc and a 2 inch perc then that is usually enough of a difference for them to settle dominance issues, and in many cases they can be the same size and will settle issues on their own. Percs and False percs are not as physical with each other as all other clowns *in most cases*, but be sure when you have any other clown species that your difference in size is enough (but not too drastic), this typically only applies for True and False percs.
Sizes: It is also important to know that when I mean noticeable size difference with clowns, I do not mean go out and get a 4 inch percula and a 1 inch percula, if the size difference is too drastic, then the bigger one will just get ticked off, and treat the small one as any other large clown would a smaller one, but the size difference would just be too much, and the smaller one would get hurt or killed. This applies to all Clownfish species.

Note on Anemones:
Clowns can form a symbiotic relationship with anemones and will become the anemone's host and live in it, and feed it in exchange for its protection. However, an anemone is not a mandatory thing to have for a clown or pair of clowns, and although they will not form a symbiotic relationship, clowns will often host other corals like frogspawn, hammer, toadstools, mushrooms, xenia, etc. and even equipment like powerheads or magnetic glass scrubbers. Also, anemones need a very stable tank to be able to thrive, so at the very least a 6 month, or more preferably, year old tank should be in order for them.

Note on Clownfish Communities:
It is possible to keep more than two clownfishes (most people do this with true and false percs) and have a successful community with a hierarchy established, but when attempting this it is best to have more than three clownfishes. From my observation and research, having three clowns is not a good idea, because one of the three will get picked out as the weakest, and will get picked on and bullied by the other two until it is very sick or dead, in most cases. So, if you want to keep more than one clown, keep a pair, or if you want to attempt a community, keep at least 4, in my opinion 5 or more, for a successful social hierarchy to establish.

Once a hierarchy has been established there will be a dominant female, and one of the other clowns will step up as her male, and the rest will remain supposedly sexless juveniles (they still have gonads ;)). If the female dies, then her male will become the reigning female, and one of the juvies will step up as her male, and similiarly if the male dies, one of the juvies will step up and become the female's new male partner.


Natural Host Anemones: All species found in Indo Pacific Waters.
-True percula: Heteractis magnifica and Stichodactyla mertensii.
-False Percula: Heteractis magnifica and Stichodactyla mertensii.
-Tomato: Entacmaea quadricolor.
-Cinnamon: Entacmaea quadricolor and Heteractis crispa.
-Clarkii: Entacmaea quadricolor and Heteractis crispa.
-Pink Skunk: Heteractus crispa, Heteractus magnifica, Macrodactyla doreensis, and Stichtodactyla gigantean.
-Orange Skunk: Stichodactyla mertensii and Heteractis crispa.
-Saddleback: Heteractus crispa, Macrodactyla doreensis, and Stichtodactyla hadoni.
-Sebae: Entacmaea quadricolor and Heteractis malu.
-Maroon: Entacmaea quadricolor.

Clownfish Sleep Too: :)
Some people come in to the room sometimes to find their clown(s) on the sandbed on their side, or in a cave on their belly, or in any other odd position, and don't know what they are doing. Clownfish sleep! Don't be alarmed when you see it hapening, its quite normal for a clown to sleep in a very strange way, and for the most part, any behaviour we might find abnormal is more often than not quite normal for a clownfish. (Excluding, of course, sickness or imminent death, which is much more obvious in most cases.)

Temperament: (these are all just according to LiveAquaria)
True Perc: Semi-Agressive
False Perc/Ocellaris: Peaceful
Tomato: Semi-Agressive
Cinnamon: Semi-Agressive
Clarkii: Semi-Agressive
Pink Skunk: Semi-Agressive
Orange Skunk: Semi-Agressive
White stripe/gold stripe Maroon: Agressive
Sebae: Semi-Agressive
Saddleback: Semi-Agressive

**Everything here is open for amending or adding to from anyones personal experiences and so on, so please chime in!**

Edited by Tentacles, 17 February 2007 - 11:16 AM.


#2
Scott Riemer

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Edit: Nevermind. Wanted to know your references. Didn't read well enough the first time.

Edited by Scott Riemer, 18 January 2007 - 05:48 PM.

I would like to nominate Scott Riemer for MOD of the month!!!

Scott... you're amazin'. :wub:


#3
Tentacles

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that should do it for awhile, if anyone has info to add please do so, or anything to ammend....personal experiences, or if anyone wants another species let me know, ill try to add sebae in a few days

hope this all helps out

#4
mandarin dragonet

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you need what clown hosts what anemone in wild, then i would recommend this to be a sticky :)

#5
Tentacles

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you need what clown hosts what anemone in wild, then i would recommend this to be a sticky :)

thanks for the suggestion :) , ill start readin up, only know a few of those

#6
travisurfer

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where have you seen a black true perc? :huh: decent writeup although not quite enough info for a sticky. i normally just tell people to get a copy of "Clownfishes" by Joyce Wilkerson. good book for any referencing for your info.

#7
Tentacles

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where have you seen a black true perc? :huh: decent writeup although not quite enough info for a sticky. i normally just tell people to get a copy of "Clownfishes" by Joyce Wilkerson. good book for any referencing for your info.

yea i agree, some people just dont get the book tho and are new and stick a maroon with a perc and its not good, and ive seen a zillion pairing questions and whether or not black can be with oranges etc....so i wrote this up

true onyx percs are from australia reefs, or more specifically new guinea reefs, and are very hard to find, but exist none the less, ill edit that up top

Edited by Tentacles, 22 January 2007 - 03:59 PM.


#8
Weitlander

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Tentacles

With all due respect, I would be very careful in your wording above.

As you state there is indeed a "black" percula clownfish.

Traditionally the fish Amphiprion polymnus (saddleback clownfish or yellowfinned anemonefish) has been called the "black percula" because of its morphological similarity to the Amphiprion percula (true clown fish or orange anemonefish). This fish was first described in the late 18th century.

mdavisunknownclown.JPG


While there is a version of the A. percula that has darker markings than the traditional color morphology, it is not truly a "black percula". It has gone by the name "onyx" in the breeder circles, however.

Onyx
onyx_p01.jpg

Regular



The fish you are referring to as the true "black ocellaris" is a fish that has been bed in captivity to have more black and less orange (or no orange) coloration. ORA Farms is spearheading this program. Ocellaris are also commonly knows as "false percula clownfish", thought they are not a mimick fish as they have separate and non overlapping natural habitats.

A. percula was described taxonomically in 1802 while ocellaris came along about 30 years later.

Ocellaris
falsepercula.jpg

Black Ocellaris
blackfalsepercula.jpg

Finally, the most important distinguishing characteristic that can separate ocellaris from percula is not the width or coloration as those can vary greatly from specimen to specimen as well as from wild caught to tank bred fish.

The most accurate and only correct scientific means of distinction is by the number of dorsal rays, dorsal spines and sometimes shape of the caudal find...altough these can be difficult to determine by the average fishkeeper. There are also subtle differences in the eyes both in anatomical inset and refractory index, believed to be due to the different water clarity levels in the fishs natural geographic habitat.

Edited by Christopher Marks, 11 January 2013 - 05:11 PM.


#9
Tentacles

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Tentacles

With all due respect, I would be very careful in your wording above.

As you state there is indeed a "black" percula clownfish.

Traditionally the fish Amphiprion polymnus (saddleback clownfish or yellowfinned anemonefish) has been called the "black percula" because of its morphological similarity to the Amphiprion percula (true clown fish or orange anemonefish). This fish was first described in the late 18th century.

mdavisunknownclown.JPG
While there is a version of the A. percula that has darker markings than the traditional color morphology, it is not truly a "black percula". It has gone by the name "onyx" in the breeder circles, however.

Onyx
onyx_p01.jpg

Regular

The fish you are referring to as the true "black ocellaris" is a fish that has been bed in captivity to have more black and less orange (or no orange) coloration. ORA Farms is spearheading this program. Ocellaris are also commonly knows as "false percula clownfish", thought they are not a mimick fish as they have separate and non overlapping natural habitats.

A. percula was described taxonomically in 1802 while ocellaris came along about 30 years later.

Ocellaris
falsepercula.jpg

Black Ocellaris
blackfalsepercula.jpg

Finally, the most important distinguishing characteristic that can separate ocellaris from percula is not the width or coloration as those can vary greatly from specimen to specimen as well as from wild caught to tank bred fish.

The most accurate and only correct scientific means of distinction is by the number of dorsal rays, dorsal spines and sometimes shape of the caudal find...altough these can be difficult to determine by the average fishkeeper. There are also subtle differences in the eyes both in anatomical inset and refractory index, believed to be due to the different water clarity levels in the fishs natural geographic habitat.

thank you for your information, edits soon to come
Im aware that the coloration between the two is slightly different and will adjust as such, but I have seen specimens much darker and more covered in black than that one and will post a picture. My main point was to get across that they will pair with each other, and it is indeed called an onyx perc like I stated and some do call it the ''black true perc'' Also I found that the easiest, not most important way, to distinguish between true and false was their bands because its hard to count the amount of spines on the dorsal when the fish is one inch long and swimming quickly in a tank, and you can see very well the banding differences between true and false if you have a one inch specimen of each in a tank swimming quickly. I will add your info. to the list and thanks, distinguisnments are important.
Id never heard a saddleback called that but I will try to add saddleback and sebea soon for more clarifcation and info. when I add anemone info.
Id add a pic of one I stumbled upon but my pics load isnt working well, but I just saw a guy over at RC with slightly darker percs that had solid black dorsals unlike the one above. In tine I will try to find some quality pics to help explain this all more. thanks again
edit:and for the record thats the first time ive ever been to RC :D lol

Edited by Christopher Marks, 11 January 2013 - 05:12 PM.


#10
Tentacles

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info added and updated, thanks weitlander for pointing out very important info. still open for more suggestions and experiences

#11
Tentacles

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saddleback and sleeping info added, sebea started, dont know much about them...anyone have some sebea info to contribute?? black/onyx perc coloration is finished, last thing I have on the list is anemone info on what clowns host what preferably....any other suggestions?

#12
Weitlander

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I think you should omit any information on pricing. Prices can vary considerably depending on vendor, breeder and location. (east coast vs west coast).

The price that you pay in Virginia may be much higher than someone who can get the fish on the west coast.

Its one thing to gather and provide a single resource of factual information. Its another to offer opinion and personal preference. Poor taste when they are combined.

#13
Tentacles

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I think you should omit any information on pricing. Prices can vary considerably depending on vendor, breeder and location. (east coast vs west coast).

The price that you pay in Virginia may be much higher than someone who can get the fish on the west coast.

Its one thing to gather and provide a single resource of factual information. Its another to offer opinion and personal preference. Poor taste when they are combined.

a little less harsh on it and Id pleasantly consider your opinion, and edit as such. ill remove pricing, which again, is a very small aspect of my guide and people could easily tell that, but dont bash a helpful guide that I provided only because of the absence of one, and if my quoted price is at the very highest of a current average for the fish's current market, then no one should be taking any offense to it I would think, if anything theyd be flattered they are able to offer a lower price and be happy about it. And I did say ''they will vary with availbility'', not stating that they had to be that price or they werent worth it, im not tryong to be snoody about this, just helpful ;)

thank you for the helpful parts of your post

edit: I just read through Joyce Wilkersons book and found alot of 'in my opinion'' or ''in my experience'' text and she has a very sucessful book, so for now I may leave the pricing opinion up because if someone finds the guide helpful then they sometimes appreciate the author of the guides opinions. thanks again

Edited by Tentacles, 22 January 2007 - 06:30 PM.


#14
Weitlander

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a little less harsh on it and Id pleasantly consider your opinion


In the real world people tell it like it is and so do I. If you take my criticism as harsh and use the interpreted tone as to whether or not you heed the advice...well, thats just silly.

edit: I just read through Joyce Wilkersons book and found alot of 'in my opinion'' or ''in my experience'' text and she has a very sucessful book, so for now I may leave the pricing opinion up because if someone finds the guide helpful then they sometimes appreciate the author of the guides opinions. thanks again


Joyce Wilkerson can do that.

Tentacles, who has kept a clownfish for all of 4 months (? maybe less), cannot.

#15
Tentacles

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Tentacles, who has kept a clownfish for all of 4 months (? maybe less), cannot.

I told you already thanks for the advice and ammended my guide as far as i saw fit as such.

Ive studied clowns for biology, and and kept clowns longer than that, keeping a reef yes about 5 months, but clowns, longer, so dont advertise false information, i could just as easily say you dont have a tank because you a new member. Ive also met the author and am well aware of her capabilities, and got to get a little taste of what she studied, she lives about 20 minutes away from me. This isnt helpful in my thread whatsoever so if its what you feel like saying please refrain, its not helping a thing. If you find any actual false information let me know, but refrain from the clutter, its useless towards my postings, and if I wanna express my opinion ill do it and people who want to take it can and people who dont can kindly refrain, like I clearly stated.

Thank you

Edited by Tentacles, 23 January 2007 - 01:18 PM.


#16
[WDT]TardFarmer

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Nice topic, thanks for the info. Yesterday I went out and purchased another clown to put in my tank after reading this topic. I had been contemplating it for a while and finally bit the bullet. After acclimating the new clown to the tank and dropping it in the water they checked each other out and started excitedly wiggling around each other. Then the new one started exploring the tank while the existing one (who is maybe a 1/4 of the size bigger) followed him around like a little puppy dog. Omen, my existing clown had never really strayed from the front of the tank. With the new guy in there Omen is much more active just following the little guy around everywhere. No biting or chasing just following and it almost looks like they are playing. I checked this AM before I went to work and they were sleeping together on the sand! I think they like each other. It was amazing how much Omen's personality perked up now that she has a playmate. Lots of fun!!

#17
shiveley

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so, are you saying that it would be okay to put a false and a true percula together in the same tank, assuming that there is enough size differentiation between the two?

i ask because that's what i was hoping to do, and i was planning on getting them both tonight...

#18
Tentacles

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so, are you saying that it would be okay to put a false and a true percula together in the same tank, assuming that there is enough size differentiation between the two?

i ask because that's what i was hoping to do, and i was planning on getting them both tonight...

sure can :)

tardfarmer thats awesome, even though my maroon is a hostile fish :P as soon as I put a little guy in there and they got used to each other its been nothing but playtime, its real cool to watch. Have fun with them!

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sure can :)

tardfarmer thats awesome, even though my maroon is a hostile fish :P as soon as I put a little guy in there and they got used to each other its been nothing but playtime, its real cool to watch. Have fun with them!



yeah it's crazy, because the first clown never really moved from the front middle of the tank, now she is everywhere, who would have guessed. :)

#20
Tentacles

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added natural host anemones, that should do it for now, let me know if there is anyything anyone wants aded or clarified/ammended. thanks!

#21
lgreen

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Tentacles,

I see one major thing that could use some clarification. There is a difference between buying clowns specifically with the intention of breeding them and just buying a pair of clowns for your nanocube or whatever. If you are actually trying to breed the fish, then yes I'd agree one large w/ one smaller. If you simply just want two clownfish though, it is not necessary to have a size difference and getting two the same size shouldn't hurt anything. In fact that is how I always buy them, and how I usually sell them unless someone specifically asks different. Mostly I just don't think people should get the idea there has to be a size difference or there will be problems, because there could just as easily be problems w/ having two of significant size difference.

The other thing you might double check is when developmentally clowns change their sex. I don't know the answer here, but I would wonder if having a juvi clown by itself for a period of time would cause it to change to a female if it was a juvi or if it would not change sexes until it becomes an adult. I know even as adults if the head female dies they can change, but it would be interesting to see if they in fact change sexes during their juvi developmental period.

Also, I'm assuming the tank sizes are your opinion? I think 5g is really pushing it for a pair of small percs. Personally I would not recommend a pair in anything below a 10g for a pair. Also 10g, may be pushing it for a pair of maroons too. If an orthodontist tells a patient they will get their braces off in 4-6 weeks, guess what they are going to run home and tell their friends? They're getting their braces off in 4 weeks. Just got to be cautious there, because people only see/hear/read/ what they want to see/hear/read.

Otherwise, looks good.

#22
Tentacles

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Tentacles,

I see one major thing that could use some clarification. There is a difference between buying clowns specifically with the intention of breeding them and just buying a pair of clowns for your nanocube or whatever. If you are actually trying to breed the fish, then yes I'd agree one large w/ one smaller. If you simply just want two clownfish though, it is not necessary to have a size difference and getting two the same size shouldn't hurt anything. In fact that is how I always buy them, and how I usually sell them unless someone specifically asks different. Mostly I just don't think people should get the idea there has to be a size difference or there will be problems, because there could just as easily be problems w/ having two of significant size difference.

The other thing you might double check is when developmentally clowns change their sex. I don't know the answer here, but I would wonder if having a juvi clown by itself for a period of time would cause it to change to a female if it was a juvi or if it would not change sexes until it becomes an adult. I know even as adults if the head female dies they can change, but it would be interesting to see if they in fact change sexes during their juvi developmental period.

Also, I'm assuming the tank sizes are your opinion? I think 5g is really pushing it for a pair of small percs. Personally I would not recommend a pair in anything below a 10g for a pair. Also 10g, may be pushing it for a pair of maroons too. If an orthodontist tells a patient they will get their braces off in 4-6 weeks, guess what they are going to run home and tell their friends? They're getting their braces off in 4 weeks. Just got to be cautious there, because people only see/hear/read/ what they want to see/hear/read.

Otherwise, looks good.

thanks very much for the info!

firstly the 5g is for one small perc, not a pair, and I used my reference as mr fosi kept one in his 5g for some time. Ill need to clarify that its for 1 not two, thanks for pointing that out.

secondly yes I agree that the juvy thought needs some clarification, and I will add the whole sexual development soon, its a good idea, and what i mean by if they are kept alone after one month or longer they can turn female was based on the fact that they had matured past the juvy age, I will clarify that! that bit of info. came from my juvy maroon I had that became a crazy female in about 1.5 months time, and a very good convo. I had with Chupacabra a while back. i will find info and cite it soon.

thirdly, i will try to carify the size difference issue, for some clowns size difference isnt important like percs and occys. and I have a note about that in the guide under pairing info. (Ill make it bold ;)) that it doesnt have to be a big size differene with them, but Im pretty sure some species need to have a relatively good difference or they will never settle dominance issues, but thats only if your trying to make a same species pair. Clowns like maroons and tomatos were what i was after, the more agressive ones. I will add info. to that.

thanks lgreen, input is very appreciated

Edited by Tentacles, 25 January 2007 - 12:55 PM.


#23
fewskillz

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here's a picture of my A. Ocellaris pair, one orange, one black:

Posted Image

My name is Chris, and...I...have...an......aquarium....man, this is hard............addiction.  There, I said it, that feels better.
180 mixed reef - 5.5 BB Nano Reef - 15 PFW


#24
Tentacles

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awesome pic fewskillz, thanks! pefect examples, and that black looks amazing.

#25
fewskillz

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Thank you very much, he's a cool lil fish. He's matured a lot since I got him. When I got him last August his face was almost all orange all the way to the first stripe. Solid black now. His stripes even have that hue of blue in them, more-so than the orange one and even with the actinics turned off. That picture hides him in the background shadows, but it was the best I had of the two of them. He's very beautiful in person.

My name is Chris, and...I...have...an......aquarium....man, this is hard............addiction.  There, I said it, that feels better.
180 mixed reef - 5.5 BB Nano Reef - 15 PFW